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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Edward Thorn


Douglas Carse

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While extending my family tree research,I got a bit stuck with one of the indiiduals.

Edward Thorn married in Stirling on 12/11/1914, and is listed on the certificate as being a Blacksmith, Lance Corporal, 5th Royal Scots Fusiliers.

The two records of death I have managed to find are both from the Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders. One born in Govan, and one born in Grangemouth, neither of whom really fit him being born in Stranraer.(Scottish War Memorial has one dying in 1916, and one in 1917, both France & Flanders))

Before I do much more digging, is it possible that the Roval Scots and A&S joined forces in France?

Maybe Edward survived the war, and I just haven't found him yet!

Douglas

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Hi Douglas,

It does look like Edward survived the war. He certainly didn't serve overseas with the RSF, since part of his service record has survived (online at Ancestry under 'British Army WWI Pension Records 1914-1920') and shows him being discharged as time-expired in Dec 1915 with no overseas service.

Cheers,

Stuart

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Excellent!. Thanks for that pointer. I hadn't done the pension records.

Time expired? Is that what's covered by Para 392 (XXX)(poss XXI) Kings Regulations as the reason he became non-effective?

His discharge was in Portobello, so that gives another direction to start searching for what happenned next.

Could he have been called up later, as he would only have been around 25 at time of discharge?

Douglas

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Hi

Could this be your Edward Thorn? C1892 - 1978.Died Newton Stewart area/Dumfries and Galloway.

jaja

Possibly......

He was certainly born in 1892, although he was called Edward Blain at the time of birth. He became Thorn shortly after, and that was his name when married in 1914.

I found a formal record of the name change in the register of births, and that document is actually dated 1968.

Regards

Douglas

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I see that it states Para 392 xxx on the last sheet, but I was going by the details on the 'Statement of the Services' sheet (the one that mentions Portobello) which gives Para 392 (xxi). This, to me, makes more sense because in my KOSB research it is the usual way in which pre-war territorials were discharged in early 1916.

I am always surprised at the number of relatively young men discharged under this regulation who appear never to have re-enlisted or been called up again. I know of a couple who went in to munitions work straight after discharge, perhaps in an effort to avoid call-up? These men had already served at Gallipoli, so probably thought they had 'done their bit'. I also know of a couple of others who re-enlisted with the Royal Navy, which they may have viewed as a safer option.

Cheers,

Stuart

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Possibly......

He was certainly born in 1892, although he was called Edward Blain at the time of birth. He became Thorn shortly after, and that was his name when married in 1914.

I found a formal record of the name change in the register of births, and that document is actually dated 1968.

Regards

Douglas

I re checked the info and its him

jaja

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