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Remembered Today:

Jack Cornwell


paul guthrie
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Is he the youngest? Bet he's not but was 16 1/2. East End Now & Then has an account of his spectacular funeral at Leyton and quotes his CO as saying he stood & waited while awaiting orders at his gun on HMS Chester during Jutland. He died.

I have wondered if he deserved the VC or if perhaps RN was anxious to award one, maybe both.

I doubt Captain saw him but don't know. If we take his words litterly he was deserving but he was mortally wounded & that may not be compatible with standing, but I was not there. If Captain did not see him, who reported this? Do reports exist.

John Travers Cornwell, surely one of the best known VCs. There is a lovely memorial in Chester Cathedral.

I have asked about this before but had not read what Captain said then.

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I think a 15-year-old named 'Boy Monger' won the VC in India in the 1850s whilst serving with the RWF (then 23rd foot?); later became colonel of the Regiment and died about 1919.

Richard

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According to what I have read the authorities took such a long time to announce the VC award , that Jack Cornwell's father had died before the announcement was made. It appears that Jack Cornwell's father had originally been reluctant to allow his son to join the navy.

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Does anybody know where J. Cornwall's VC, war medals & plaque are now??

Just my opinion, of course, but I doubt the Captain of the Chester would even have known he existed - guess it would depend upon how how long he was on board prior to Jutland, - his SR would reveal that - Chester was a pretty new ship (lauched in Dec '15) at the time of Jutland & carried a fair complement & a new ships complement of men, & she must have barely been out of work ups. Normally ship's Captains dont have a much to do with the training of the Boys - no doubt he might have seen J.C. at times but I would have doubt they ever spoke - remember at that time there was a very large 'class' gulf here also.

I think an officer who witnessed the action & J.C.'s part in it would have had to recommend him to the Captain, perhaps the Gunnery Officer - is that not the case for VC awards??? Dont there have to be a couple of actual witnesses to the action???

Bryan

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Does anybody know where J. Cornwall's VC, war medals & plaque are now??

I believe his VC is on display at the IWM ... I am sure I have seen it there.

Circumstantial evidence and Beatty's brief recommendation that referred to the "justice of his memory ... and the example he set", would suggest he performed no heroic deed but who can deny JC the fame his memory has attained.

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According to what I have read the authorities took such a long time to announce the VC award , that Jack Cornwell's father had died before the announcement was made. It appears that Jack Cornwell's father had originally been reluctant to allow his son to join the navy.

Jack Cornwell's father was serving with the Royal Defence Corps when he died & he is remembered on the CWGC site here

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According to what I have read the authorities took such a long time to announce the VC award , that Jack Cornwell's father had died before the announcement was made. It appears that Jack Cornwell's father had originally been reluctant to allow his son to join the navy.

Jack Cornwell's father was serving with the Royal Defence Corps when he died & he is remembered on the CWGC site here

In that case as Jack Cornwell's father died on the 25th October 1916 and the official citation was published on 15th September 1916, his father must have known about his son's VC, unless he was in a coma.

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According to what I have read the authorities took such a long time to announce the VC award , that Jack Cornwell's father had died before the announcement was made. It appears that Jack Cornwell's father had originally been reluctant to allow his son to join the navy.

Jack Cornwell's father was serving with the Royal Defence Corps when he died & he is remembered on the CWGC site here

In that case as Jack Cornwell's father died on the 25th October 1916 and the official citation was published on 15th September 1916, his father must have known about his son's VC, unless he was in a coma.

Sorry Myrtle but I'm unaware of the circumstances of Eli Cornwell's death.........My guess is that he did know of his son's award of the VC prior to his death & that he didn't is an urban myth.

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Will - who is pictured in your new avator? Is it yr Grandfather or his brother by any chance ... I remember the story from our trip to Verdun.

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If it was the intent of Admiralty to raise force or homefront morale, it sure worked on the latter. The funeral route was lined with thousands of people, was huge! He has a lovely headstone also. Jack Cornwell did his bit.

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Any chance of posting a pic of his headstone??

Bryan

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Jack Cornwell's elder brother was killed in the war too. He was in the 13/London Regt. and is buried in H.A.C. Cemetery, Ecoust-St. Mein.

Andy.

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Will - who is pictured in your new avator? Is it yr Grandfather or his brother by any chance ... I remember the story from our trip to Verdun.

Jon

Regrettably I don't possess any photos of my Grandfathers brother. My Avatar is a local casualty who I've been researching. Pte George Phaup who was killed in April 1918 whilst serving with the 2/4 Ox & Bucks

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Will - who is pictured in your new avator?  Is it yr Grandfather or his brother by any chance ... I remember the story from our trip to Verdun.

Jon

Regrettably I don't possess any photos of my Grandfathers brother. My Avatar is a local casualty who I've been researching. Pte George Phaup who was killed in April 1918 whilst serving with the 2/4 Ox & Bucks

Will - its a good choice all the same.

Jon

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Guest Warburton

I have an interest in Jack Cornwell and thought you may be interested in seeing the following press release photo of him from 1916.

The photo was taken while he was with HMS Vivid for gunnery training before joining HMS Chester.

Obviously there are those who say his VC was more for moral and propaganda issues than actually being deserved. But to my mind he was a very brave young lad who gave his life for his country. He did his duty and stood by his post when seriously wounded. Also from the accounts i have read he was extremely brave whilst in Grimsby General Hospital where he died.

HE WAS FULLY DESERVING OF THE VICTORIA CROSS FOR VALOUR.

warburton

post-24-1088342471.jpg

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There is a (9750 foot) "memorial" to John Cornwell out this way. There is a photo and a mini-bio at this site:

http://www.peakfinder.com/peakfinder.asp?P...=Mount+Cornwell

There is also a mountain named after his ship.

There seems to have been some good friends of the Navy among the powers-that-be in those days. We have a good number of mountains and whatnot named after sailors, even when there is no connection with Canada.

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