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Michelle Young

Dame Lucy Innes Branfoot

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Michelle Young

This lady died in Rouen March 16 1916 and I have a photo passed to me by my Dad of her headstone in what must be in one of the St Sever Cemeteries. She worked on Lady Mabelle Egeton's Coffee Stall. I found the LG entry about her estate which sated she dies in Rouen. I can't find her on the CWGC data base though she has a CWGC stone and the photo is obviously taken in a CWGC cemetery. I have tried variations of Branfoot and Innes-B but still she is eluding me. Can someone find her please?

Thanks, Michelle

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Sue Light

Michelle

I might be wrong, but I think that although her grave is cared for by the CWGC, she was working as a civilian and not as part of one of the groups that qualify for commemoration, so does not appear on the database. She died at No.8 General Hospital of bronchitis and Bright's Disease.

Sue

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Michelle Young

Thanks Sue, I thought that you would know!

Michelle

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Sue Light

I'm not really sure that I do! :)

Sue

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Jim Strawbridge

I am confused now. I thought that she was CWGC recognised in the normal way and had guessed that the Lady Mabelle Egerton's Coffee Stall was one of the recognised organisations. Her grave is in the Officer's plot A.2.6 in St. Sever Cemetery. The headstone is not one of the clipped varieties. I have now searched for her using the CWGC website by both name and cemetery without success. Terry Denham will know for certain but it seems likely that the CWGC care for her grave as one of the few exceptions and that she is not an official war grave in their eyes.

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centurion

Lady Mabelle Egerton opened her Coffee Stall at Rouen Station in Dec 1914 (it was actually called the Coffee Shop), it was the second British voluntary canteen to go to France. It became affiliated to the Church Army in 1917. By 1918 the Church Army was one of the limited number organisations authorized by the Adjutant-General. One for the 'in out of the cold' brigade?

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colin.reeves

I'd like to thank all in this "topic" for enabling to me glean some information about this lady, especially Michelle for starting it. I recently started doing a little research involving my family as a result of making some very interesting discoveries amongst the family heirlooms (mainly very old books!). All my life I've been aware that Sir Arthur Mudge Branfoot was my great grandfather, however, it is only in the last week that I became aware of his two marriages and learned more about the subsequent off-spring! The question I've been trying to find the answer to was which of his daughters was my grandmother. Having studied the 1911 census (and various other sources) it seems perfectly clear that Dame Lucy is indeed my great grandmother!

During my "searches", this forum clearly jumped out at me and hence my application to register.

Michelle, I'd dearly love to know a little more about the history of the photograph of the headstone. Is there any significance as to why your father had this photo or was it simply because she seems to be an "exception"?

Thanks to everybody in this topic, I now know more about this interesting lady, and I also know where to go and find her!

Thanks

Colin (Branfoot) Reeves

yes! .. that is my middle name!

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Jim Strawbridge

Colin, I have, for a long time, been researching WW1 serving female casualties. I have a little on Dame Lucy. I know that she had two children as per the 1911 census one of whom was Ruth. I do not know the name of the other. If you should know I whould be pleased to hear. But more importantly should you have a photograph of Dame Lucy that I can use in a Register that I am producing for publication I would be very grateful, Jim

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Michelle Young

Colin

My father is a member of this forum; his user name is MJohnson. I will alert his attention to this thread as he probably has the photo rather than me. When you have 5 posts you can message him directly. I think he took the photo as the headstome took his atteention as being unusual. Jim Strawbridge may also have a photo.

Regards, Michelle

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colin.reeves

Thank you Jim and thank you (again) Michelle.

Jim, you are indeed correct and Ruth Doris was my father's mother. I believe her brother was Denis. Dame Lucy also brought up two step daughters who would have been approx aged 2 and 1 when she married Arthur Mudge Branfoot in 1886. Lucy and Arther would have spent most of their adult life in India with him eventually retiring as Surgeon General. He was awarded the CIE in 1888 and KCIE in 1911. He died in 1914 by which time the off-spring would have been in adulthood and so I guess she felt free to go off and "do her bit" as it were.

Sadly I haven't come across any photos as yet but I will let you know if I do.

Best regards, Colin

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MJohnson

Hello Colin

Have found the photo of Dame Lucys headstone and would be happy to send it to you via the forum . Yes I did take the headstone as I had never seen one before with this inscription . Also because of my admiration for ladies who go to the war zones to give comfort to our soldiers whatever their role .

Maurice

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Michelle Young

Dad, I sent the photo to Colin yesterday! :whistle:

Michelle

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colin.reeves

My wife and I went to visit the St Sever Cemetries last weekend, primarily to find Dame Lucy. The whole experience of visiting a war cemetry was an overwhelming honour and I'd like to thank those in this forum for providing not only information, but the inspiration to do so!

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Lucy London

Your efforts cannot have been in vain, for Dame Lucy Innes Branfoot is included in the CWGC Casualty List of Females in WW1 as "Non World War Dead" at St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France - Reference Officers, A.2.6.

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Phil Wood

Noticed this headstone when wandering around St Sever today, and found this thread as a result.Branfoot.jpg

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TJones

I have been lucky enough to recently track down the original records of The Rouen Station Coffee Shop which includes a full staff list of volunteers and the dates they arrived. Dame Lucy Innes Branfoot arrived there on 2nd May 1915 with a Miss Branfoot, presumably her daughter Ruth? 

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Jim Strawbridge
2 hours ago, TJones said:

I have been lucky enough to recently track down the original records of The Rouen Station Coffee Shop which includes a full staff list of volunteers and the dates they arrived. Dame Lucy Innes Branfoot arrived there on 2nd May 1915 with a Miss Branfoot, presumably her daughter Ruth? 

 

If you still have access to the original records would you please look up the name of Smith Dorien ? She died on the 19th April 1915 whilst there.

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TJones

Miss C. Dorrien-Smith arrived on 14th March 1915, with Miss B. Dorrien-Smith.  I believe Miss C. Dorrien-Smith died of pneumonia.  I have the date recorded as 18th April 1915.

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Jim Strawbridge
15 hours ago, TJones said:

Miss C. Dorrien-Smith arrived on 14th March 1915, with Miss B. Dorrien-Smith.  I believe Miss C. Dorrien-Smith died of pneumonia.  I have the date recorded as 18th April 1915. 

 

That's very helpful. I had her as Smith Dorien. "Miss Smith Dorien was admitted to 10 General Hospital, along with her sister and Lady Egerton (aged 18), suffering from measles and bronchitis. She died on the 19th April 1915".

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TJones

I have another source that says that there had been an epidemic of measles at this time, poor Miss Dorrien-Smith obviously developed bronchitis as well. 

 

I think there was at at least one other lady that died, but later on, (besides Dame Lucy Branfoot), I need to check through the records again. Are you only interested in this one, or any others I find?

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Marilyne

Hi guys, 

 

Reopening this thread is very good for my own thread on the women on the Western Front. 

It happens that I entered Mrd Branfoot's name in the database a few days ago and it came out blank confirming what I was fearing: one can figure out the names of the women in a cemetery by searching the database on rank (nurse, VAD, worker...) or unit (TFNS, QMAAC ... ) but civilians will not be listed and then... good luck finding that ONE last grave in a cemetery of a few thousands... 

So thanks for this information!!!! 

 

M.

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Marilyne
On ‎20‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 11:59, Jim Strawbridge said:

 

. "Miss Smith Dorien was admitted to 10 General Hospital, along with her sister and Lady Egerton (aged 18), suffering from measles and bronchitis. She died on the 19th April 1915".

 

Do we know where this lady was buried?? I Don't have her on my lists…

 

M.

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Jim Strawbridge
19 hours ago, Marilyne said:

 

Do we know where this lady was buried?? I Don't have her on my lists…

 

M.

 

She is buried in St. Nicholas' churchyard, Tresco, Isles of Scilly. Having been to Tresco it is a magical place, as is the whole of the Scillies. The church and churchyard may be private ones for access. 

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Marilyne
3 hours ago, Jim Strawbridge said:

 

She is buried in St. Nicholas' churchyard, Tresco, Isles of Scilly. Having been to Tresco it is a magical place, as is the whole of the Scillies. The church and churchyard may be private ones for access. 

 

so not on the front... interesting. 

Thanks. 

M.

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