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STAFFORDSHIRE YEOMANRY


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Guest milpat

I have just inherited from my Grandmother, a large bronze circular medal with the words "he died for freedom and honour" and my Great Uncle's name Donald Middleton printed on the medal. My children who are 6 and 8 are fascinated by the story of such a young man, he was 20, losing his life. I understand that he was a Private in "C" squadron, and dies on the 25th November 1917. I was wondering whether all servicemen who died received this plaque, and if anybody out there had any information on Mr Donald Middleton.

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hello, 300867 pte donald middleton staffs yeo

killed in action 25/11/17 egypt

enlisted stafford

residence wolverhampton

enoch

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Hello milpat, welcome to the forum.

If you look at this thread on the forum, you'll see that I typed the entire war history of the Staffs Yeomanry, so you'll be able to see where you Great Uncle served and died.

According to the records of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission:

Name: MIDDLETON, DONALD

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Private

Regiment: Staffordshire Yeomanry

Unit: "C" Sqdn.

Age: 20

Date of Death: 25/11/1917

Service No: 300867

Additional information: Son of William and Lavinia E. Middleton, of 20, Newbridge St., Wolverhampton.

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 2

Cemetery: JERUSALEM MEMORIAL

Thus he has no known grave, but is listed on one of the panels on the Jerusalem Memorial.

Hope that gives you a good start!

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Hi,

from Soldiers Died,

Donald Middleton, 300867

Died in Egypt,

from CWGC

Son of William and Lavinia E. Middleton, of 20, Newbridge St., Wolverhampton.

JERUSALEM MEMORIAL Panel 2.

Thats all i have but i am sure others will be able to give you more info.

Mandy

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Guest milpat
Hello Milpat.

Donald Middleton commemorated here in Wolverhampton.http://wolverhamptonwarmemorials.com/Compton-Road-Memorial

Regards Doug

Doug, thanks for the info, my parents in Aldridge are going to check it out. Could you tell me where I can find out when and where he enlisted? Millie is taking part in a speech competition and this is going to be her project.

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"Enoch Beard" has given you the information on the town where your Great Uncle enlisted in your earlier posting - Stafford. Stafford was the location of the Regimental Headquarters of the Staffordshire Yeomanry before the war and was where many of the recruits went to enlist, as the Territorial Force maintained separate recruiting arrangements up until December 1915 when direct enlistments were abolished.

It may be worthwhile looking at the microfilms of the "Express and Star" or "Midland Evening News" held at Wolverhampton Archives. These might just provide you with an approximate date of when he joined the Yeomanry. His parents may have provided these local newspapers with details for an obituary.

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Milpat

You have two threads open on this subject,your question has been answered on the other one,click on the Long Long Trail and find out how to research your Great Uncle. According to CWGC & SDGW, Donald enlisted in Stafford, C Squadron were from Burton-on-Trent.

Regards Doug

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I have just inherited from my Grandmother, a large bronze circular medal with the words "he died for freedom and honour" and my Great Uncle's name Donald Middleton on the medal. on the 25th November 1917. I was wondering whether all servicemen who died received this plaque,

In answer to this part of your original query,

Yes the Authorised Next of Kin of All those who died,or were killed in action,or whose post War death was attributed to War service,would have in normal circumstances received this Plaque.

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Guest Pete Wood
In answer to this part of your original query,

Yes the Authorised Next of Kin of All those who died,or were killed in action,or whose post War death was attributed to War service,would have in normal circumstances received this Plaque.

If I can just clear up a point, here:

The "authorised next of kin" is the nearest next of kin of the deceased when the plaque and scroll was issued.

For example, if an unmarried soldier did not see eye to eye with his parents, he might have made his brother his next of kin (in his will). BUT, the army would have presented his scroll to his nearest next of kin (father), irrespective of the soldier's wishes.

The scroll was often sent months, if not years, before the plaque. So, hypothetically, the plaque would (if the father has subsequently died) be sent to the nearest relative (the mother, who might be divorced and married to another man).

In other words, it was sent to the nearest next of kin, AT THE TIME OF ISSUE, according to a list drawn up by the records office - and not neceesarily be issued to the person (or member of family) elected by the soldier in any will (and/or legal document).

So the plaque could, and often did, end up in one household - while the scroll ended up with another family.

Only one plaque and one scroll was issued. So even though a distant relative may have had more of a 'moral' claim to the plaque and scroll, the government would not issue a second set (even for payment) to another family member.

I do know of some families who got around this, by claiming that the plaque had been stolen - or destroyed in a fire. But it needed the original claimant of the plaque and scroll to be part to this deception, in order for another member of the family to receive a replacement.

Post war deaths had to be confirmed by a doctor, as attributable to war causes. Even then, the military often over-ruled the decision and refused to make a plaque. Basically, if a pension was awarded then a plaque and scroll was issued.

Women were also eligible to receive a plaque and scroll in the right circumstances.

Soldiers who were executed were NOT eligible for a plaque and scroll. However, the next of kin of SOME soldiers, shot at dawn, did receive a plaque and scroll. The plaque was issused to the NOK of soldiers who died in accidents or committed suicide, but not to those "who died in disgraceful circumstances." This phrase does not apply to executed soldiers, and was applied to an additional group of soldiers.

I have no idea what the above phrase means, and I welcome any feedback (and examples!!) on it....

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  • 17 years later...
On 02/06/2004 at 19:24, Guest milpat said:

I have just inherited from my Grandmother, a large bronze circular medal with the words "he died for freedom and honour" and my Great Uncle's name Donald Middleton printed on the medal. My children who are 6 and 8 are fascinated by the story of such a young man, he was 20, losing his life. I understand that he was a Private in "C" squadron, and dies on the 25th November 1917. I was wondering whether all servicemen who died received this plaque, and if anybody out there had any information on Mr Donald Middleton.

Hi, Donald Middleton was also my great uncle.

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Welcome to the forum. milpat is no longer a member, as denoted by Guest. We won’t have any contact information for them.

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