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Remembered Today:

The Hundred Days


DavidMillichope
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How would you "rebrand" the Hundred Days in such a way that it might capture the public imagination more ?

I know there is great frustration amongst historians that the meaning of the Hundred Days ( along with the Great War in general) has been lost to later generations. In a media age I wonder if there's a better soundbite lurking in there somewhere.

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Armidale I would very much tend to agree with you 10% of the forces Aussies captured 25% on the prisoners and ground captured with help from the canucks.Yes and the Tommies :D :D :D

The Monash Freeway ,Great. If you see my avatar you get the idea !!!

MC

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How about 'The Great Advance'. However the 100 Days is well established and the period does include several formally named battles. As listed by Foch: Amiens Aug 3-13, Baupaume Aug 21-Sep1, Scarpe Aug26-Sep3, Havrincourt & Epehy Sep 12-18, Cambrai & Hinderburg Line Sep27-Oct5

Selle Oct 17-25, Sambre Nov 1 - 11.

Old Tom

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Better, but aren't the group of battles "Breaking the Hindenburg Line" already enough?

How about "The Road Back to Mons" (for us Canadians)

George

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"Over by Christmas---No Foolin' this Time"

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I know there is great frustration amongst historians that the meaning of the Hundred Days ( along with the Great War in general) has been lost to later generations. In a media age I wonder if there's a better soundbite lurking in there somewhere.

Are you suggesting we need a better name for the Great War as well? :innocent:

Roel

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Are you suggesting we need a better name for the Great War as well? :innocent:

Roel

Heh - not really. I was trying to support my "thesis" that certain historical events lose their meaning to contemporary audiences, and labels can influence this.

But seeing as you've raised this ..

I've grown to dislike the label WW1 more and more. It fits in better with with the world wide perspective ( seeing it as a continuing struggle etc), but from a "branding perspective" it has muddied the waters for British and French audiences. It's my belief that 1914-18 was truly "their great war". I prefer to see it as their seminal event of the 20th century, not WW2, despite what people like Churchill would like us to believe.

On the subject of personal favourites for Great War/ WW1 how about :-

The First War of Germanic Expansion ( or Fourth depending on how you are counting )

The First War of British succession.

One problem, as I see it, is that these "global industrial wars" are actually amalgamations of historical movements. The Great War in Eastern Europe can be seen as the "Last War of Turkish Succession" whereas in Western Europe it can be seen as either of the two I offered above.

I'm really enjoying your contributions. :)

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Thanks for the contributions , guys - serious and humerous :D

It's a difficult one. The Hundred Days is such a mosaic of different battles, allies and issues. My own choice for a modern audience would be "Battles of the Breakthrough" ( in line with jdajd's second offering).

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Victory out of the Trenches?

Collapse of the Central Powers?

Advance to the Armistice?

To the End of the War?

Breakthrough on the Western Front?

From the Darkest Days into the Light?

but keeping the tone....

The Last Hundred Days to Victory

I just wonder about the Casualty Rates of these 100 days compared to the "bloodbath" of earlier battles.... it seems to be significantly higher than the Somme, yet they carried on... perhaps it was the relief of finally getting out of the mud of the Trench systems into green countryside?

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I just wonder about the Casualty Rates of these 100 days compared to the "bloodbath" of earlier battles.... it seems to be significantly higher than the Somme, yet they carried on... perhaps it was the relief of finally getting out of the mud of the Trench systems into green countryside?

Contrary to what we often hear or read, Kevin, the British casualties in the period of the Somme fighting were heavier than those of The Hundred Days. This is not to say that the casualties of the final months were not high - they were heavy indeed : August 1918 cost 122,272; September 114,831; October 121,046 and November 20,925. But July 1916 cost 196,081 British casualties; September 1916 cost 115,056 and April 1917 120,070. Then there war October 1917 with 119,808; and in the fury of the German offensive March and April 1918 cost 173,721 and 143,168 respectively, with nearly all of March's loss being sustained in the final 11 days of the month. It should be noted that the One Hundred Days' casualties were spread across a very wide front, from Picardy through Artois and into Flanders, while the bulk of the 1916 and 1917 losses were sustained in horribly confined areas; furthermore, the casualties of the Somme, Arras and Passchendaele battles contained a significantly higher proportion of fatalities : in the last months, a much higher percentage of the British losses were slight wounds or gas cases, which meant that a greater proportion of those casualties lived to return home. It is true that 1918 cost more British casualties than any other year....but more were killed in 1917 than in 1918, and in the period July to October 1916 the number of British killed on the Western Front exceeded the number killed in the same months of 1918 by a margin of about fifty per cent.

Phil

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Marele Razboi.

Victoria finala a Antantei asupra Puterilor Centrale.

Andrei

p.s. I have heard some currents of thought speculating the ideea that it would not have been a decissive victory of the Entente over the Central Powers ,but rather that the Central Powers have collapsed from within(!?).

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