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bts1970

Colonel Albert Canning, help please

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bts1970

This chap is on my survivers list.

I know he lived in the big house at the end of the village but little else. I think he may well have lived in Ireland prior to the War but all i have so far is detailed below from his MIC

1/7th Battalion Manchester Regiment.

Leinster Regiment.

Medals & Awards BWM, VIC, 14/15 Star.

Details on MIC.

Colonel Canning applied for Star on 11/03/1919, Emblem 14/01/1920 and S.W.B 24/02/1920. Address given as Restrop House, Purton.

16/07/1915 Arrived Dardanelles (Gallipoli).

Name on Remembrance list in St Mary`s Church , Listed on the 1918 voters list (a NM), Restrop house

Anything that can be added would be gratefully recieved

Many thanks

Bob

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linge

Bob

Debrett's Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage and Companionage 1923

Canning, Col. Albert, C.M.G, son of Robert Canning; b. 1861; in ranks 19th Hussars 1882-8; entered S. Wales Borderers 1888, became Cap. Leinster Regt. 1895, Major 1903 (retired 1911), Lieut-Col Special Reserve 1912, and Brevet Col. and Col 1918; commanding Batns. Special Reserve and T.F. and on the Staff in France 1912-1918; Egyptian Expedition 1882 (medal, Bronze star), in Soudan 1884, present at battles of El Teb and Tamai (two clasps), European War 1914-18 (despatches, C.M.G., 1914-15 star, two medals): m 1895, Mabel Parry, da. of the late J. R. Cobb of Nythfa, Brecon, and Caldicot Castle, Monmouthshire; cr. C.M.G. 1916.

Restrop House, Purton, Wilts; United Service Club

Times 22nd November 1960

Colonel Albert Canning C.M.G. and former Justice of the Peace for Wiltshire, died at his home in Purton on Sunday at the age of 99. He had served in the Egyptian expedition of 1882, in the Sudan 1884-5 and in the Great War. He was made a C.M.G. in 1916. During the Second World War he was in the Home Guard.

He must have married a second time as there is an obit for his widow dated 21st Sept 1965 aged 97 years Margaret Frances Canning (nee Whicher), Restrop House, Purton, Wiltshire

He was born in 1861 in Ramsbury, Wiltshire to Robert and Amelia Canning. His father was a farmer. He appears to have had six siblings:

Edith Cawton Canning b 1857

Robert Walter Canning b 1859

Florence Canning b 1863

Gertrude Canning b 1865

Aubrey Cuthbert Canning b 1867

George Canning b 1871

At the time of the 1911 Census he and his wife did not have any surviving children and are recorded as living at 12, Penlee Gardens, Stoke Devonport, Devonshire

Regards

Pam

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chloeflorence

Hi Bob

Please do not be too disappointed with my reply, but I always take an interest in anything that includes the name Canning! I do not have any info about Colonel Albert Canning as such, but do have a great deal of data on Cannings generally. You mentioned Purton, presumably a village. Which Purton is this? As with most village names there is more than one! Presumably St Marys Church is also at Purton. I shall watch to see if there are any more responses, and maybe I will be able to add something.

Best wishes, Jim

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John_Hartley

A handful of mentions of him in the first volume of the battalion history. The only mention in the second volume is of him leaving in early summer 1916 to take up duties in Cork.

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bts1970

Jim

Purton is the Wiltshire village just outside Swindon i am researching, St Mary`s is the Church.

John

From his SWB i am taking a possible wound during the Gallipoli venture ? anything to assist this theory ?

For such a small village unfortunately again i have recieved nothing back from the village itself to assist in researching the Great War, indeed the response has been so poor i now no longer ask for further help as during 2 years of research i have only recieved 3 direct responses to help from villagers. Thank god for the GWF & similar sites.

Best regards

Bob

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IPT

Albert was born on October 3rd, 1861 in Hungerford, Berks, England. He died at the age of 99 on November 20th, 1960 in Swindon, Wiltshire, England

3rd son of Robert Canning of Stanton Drew, Som. Educated at Clifton College. Father refused to let him go to Sandhurst, so he served as Tpr in 19H 1882-8. Served in Egyptian Exped 1882, Sudan Exped 1884-85. Major Leinster Regt 1903. Retired 1911. Served WW1 1914-19. CMG 1916. Bn Col and Col 1918. SSAFA Cricklade Div 1920-45. JP Wilts 1922. LDV 1940. Maj Home Guard 1941. Retired 1942. ATC cadets 1942-45. Restrop House Purton Wilts. No issue.

Albert Canning & Margaret Frances (Madge) Whicher

Albert and Margaret Frances (Madge) were married in a religious ceremony on September 19th, 1941.

Margaret Frances (Madge) was born in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England. She died in Wellington, New Zealand.

Albert Canning & Mabel Parry Cobb

Albert and Mabel Parry were married in a religious ceremony.

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liverpool annie

Snippets *

Lieut.-Col. Canning is a Wiltshireman by birth, and a collateral relation of the family of Lord Stratford de Redcliffe.

On the outbreak of war he rejoined the Army and commanded a battalion in Gallipoli, including the far-famed evacuation, and afterwards in the Arabian Desert. In recognition of these services he received from His Majesty the well-earned decoration of The Most Distinguished order of St. Michael and St. George. He is at present serving in Ireland.

http://www.archive.org/stream/storyofpurto...chiala_djvu.txt

Your address caught my eye but sorry I cannot answer your letter as published in our local paper, the Guernsey Press. But this is to say that I was born at Lydiard Green and married in the Methodist Chapel there in 1947, a marriage that lasted for 55 years. My then wife-to-be was live-in maid for Colonel Canning and his wife of Restrop House and he drove my bride to the Chapel with snow and ice on the road in the month of February in that very bad winter .. and he was 85 then !

Annie :)

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IPT

WITH MANCHESTERS IN THE EAST

Author: Gerald B. Hurst

The survivors of the Battalion rested for a few days on Imbros after the

battle, and then returned to the Peninsula under the command of Captain

P.H. Creagh. On the 16th July the command was passed to

Lieutenant-Colonel A. Canning, a veteran of the Egyptian War of 1882,

who had previously commanded the Leinster Regiment at Cork. We could

have had no greater confidence in any possible Commanding Officer, and

while he acted as Brigadier of the Manchester Territorials his influence

was no less inspiring. The record of our later campaign on Gallipoli is

closely associated with his name and work.

It was pleasant to reach the cool burrow, which served as our Battalion

Headquarters. Here I found Colonel Canning, P.H. Creagh and Fawcus

sitting on the yellow, dusty ground beneath a tarpaulin. It was

thrilling once again to walk among our Manchester men, now very thin and

sunburnt, in shirt-sleeves and shorts, making the best of life in narrow

trenches, and watching day after day the serried Turkish lines and

broad, brown mass of Achi Baba

On the 19th August, Colonel Canning became temporary Brigadier. I thus

became Commanding Officer in his absence.

The routine upon which the Battalion entered at this stage remained

almost unchanged until the evacuation. Our Headquarters, where I slept

when in command of the Battalion during Colonel Canning's various short

spells as acting Brigadier, were usually in some heather-covered gorge,

opening upon a deep blue sea.

The average soldier on Gallipoli broke down after a month or two.

Comparatively few endured more than three months. Of our officers only

Scott (the Quartermaster) and Fawcus were on the Peninsula from start to

finish, though Colonel Canning, Higham and Chadwick had almost as fine

a record. Few of the sick came back to Turkey.

Our men

competed for Colonel Canning's football cup and played a great match

with the crew of the _Ben-my-Chree_, the famous seaplane carrier, sunk

by gunfire, alas, some eight months later in Kastelorizo Harbour. The

"Flashes" gave notable concerts.

From the 21st April I again enjoyed the command of the Battalion.

Colonel Canning went on leave to England, and his distinguished services

were recognised soon afterwards by a C.M.G.

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/29927/29927.txt

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grantowi

Bob,

From LG

13/4/20 - The undermentioned to be Cols - Lt.-Col. and Bt. Col. A. Canning, C.M.G., 3rd Leans. R. (since relinquished commn.). 8th June 1918.

29/4/19 - Cl. HH.—Bi,. Col. (Maj., ret. pay) A. Canning, C.M.G., late 3rd Leins. R., Spec. Res. 25th Feb. 1919.

5/11/18 - Cl. HH.—Maj. and Bt. Col. A. Canning, ret. pay. 12th Oct. 1918.

17/9/18 - Leins. R.—Lt.-Col. and Bt. Col. A. Canning, C.M.G., relinquishes his commn. on completion of the tenure of his command, and is granted permission to wear the prescribed uniform. 6th Aug. 1918.

31/4/18 - TO BE BREVET COLONEL. (On Retired List, Reserve of Officers, New- Army, or Territorial Force, in the case of Officers belonging to these categories as applicable.) - Lt.-Col. A. Canning, C.M.G. (ret. pay), Leins. it., Spec. Res.

Not sure what it means, guess he retired and was allowed to keep his uniform :-)

Grant

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IPT

THE

SEVENTH MANCHESTERS

Important changes took place

in the battalion at this rime. Lt.-Col. Canning, C.M.G,

relinquished the command, and returned home for duty

in the Cork district. His departure was sorely regretted

by all ranks, for during the twelve months he had been

with the 7th, his capabilities as a commander had only

been surpassed by his solicitude for the men's welfare, so

that he had made his way into our hearts as a popular

soldier. Major Cronshaw of the 5th Manchesters

succeeded him

http://www.archive.org/stream/sevenmanches...lsuoft_djvu.txt

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bts1970

IPT, Annie , Grant

Once again many thanks for all your time

Bob

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chloeflorence

Referring back to post 7, the quote concerning Lord Stratford de Redcliffe (Stratford Canning). If Lt Col Canning is a collateral relation of Stratford Canning, then he is related to Lord Garvagh who is descended from a Warwickshire Canning (George Canning) who went to Ireland with the Ironmongers Company as part of the Ulster Plantations sometime in the 1600s. This would mean that Lt Col Canning is not descended from the Wiltshire Cannings, who were well established in that area from early medieaval times

Useless information perhaps, who knows. Jim

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bts1970

Jim

very little that is posted on the GWF is useless mate, many thanks for your time

Bob

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christine liava'a

Albert was born on October 3rd, 1861 in Hungerford, Berks, England. He died at the age of 99 on November 20th, 1960 in Swindon, Wiltshire, England

Albert Canning & Margaret Frances (Madge) Whicher

Albert and Margaret Frances (Madge) were married in a religious ceremony on September 19th, 1941.

Margaret Frances (Madge) was born in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, England. She died in Wellington, New Zealand.

..................

No she didn't.

Perhaps it was Wellington, England.

There are no Margaret Frances Cannings who have ever died in NZ.

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bts1970

Christine

many thanks for your intrest & time

Bob

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Charles Riding

Albert Canning was my Great Uncle and I am the custodian of his medals and badges (from his time in Egypt, and with the Manchester and Leinster Regiments), together with an original framed photograph of him with other officers whilst at Border Barricade, Gully Ravine on the Gallipoli Peninsular in 1915, as well as a copy of his Despatches  signed by Winston Churchill, who was Secretary of State for War at the time - copies attached.

Reading the above posts is very humbling - as it is clear that he had the greatest respect of his men and he was one of the few lucky men to survive The Great War and lead a long and fulfilling life.

 

Albert Canning.pdf

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