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Remembered Today:

1st Battalion, East Yorkshire Regiment, 1917


paul@paulmanning.net
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Hi All

I'm researching a Corporal Walter Alexander Hill, 29018, East Yorkshire Regiment KIA 24/10/1917 aged 19. His Service Record shows he was posted to this Regiment 25th August 1917. Can anyone advise where he would have served and where he was killed? He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

Any help appreciated. I will also be posting another question regarding this casualty under 10th Battalion Training Reserve 1917.

Thanks

Paul

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Paul,

On the 20th October the Battalion again went to the front area east of Dickebusch, and took up the Brigade Supports, where they underwent a heavy shelling. Second Lieut. Parrish was wounded. On the 23rd the Battalion took over the front line at Reutel, where they remained until the night of the 28th.

Great difficulty was experienced in getting supplies to the Battalion during the time they were in the front line, owing to the awful conditions and shell fire.

A rather amusing incident occurred during this tour. The Battalion was badly in want of rifle oil, and having no other suitable container, a quantity of oil was put by the Quartermaster into a rum jar and sent up. This jar reached Brigade Headquarters safely, and remained there for a short time, with other supplies, awaiting parties from the Battalion. It is hoped the man on Brigade Staff who sampled the rifle oil in mistake for something more cheering has quite recovered from his mishap, and, shall I add, his misdeed.

The casualties suffered by the Battalion during this period were severe—15 were killed, 52 wounded, 4 missing, 6 shell shock, 25 trench feet, and 14 sick,

Regards Charles

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Paul,

On the 20th October the Battalion again went to the front area east of Dickebusch, and took up the Brigade Supports, where they underwent a heavy shelling. Second Lieut. Parrish was wounded. On the 23rd the Battalion took over the front line at Reutel, where they remained until the night of the 28th.

Great difficulty was experienced in getting supplies to the Battalion during the time they were in the front line, owing to the awful conditions and shell fire.

A rather amusing incident occurred during this tour. The Battalion was badly in want of rifle oil, and having no other suitable container, a quantity of oil was put by the Quartermaster into a rum jar and sent up. This jar reached Brigade Headquarters safely, and remained there for a short time, with other supplies, awaiting parties from the Battalion. It is hoped the man on Brigade Staff who sampled the rifle oil in mistake for something more cheering has quite recovered from his mishap, and, shall I add, his misdeed.

The casualties suffered by the Battalion during this period were severe—15 were killed, 52 wounded, 4 missing, 6 shell shock, 25 trench feet, and 14 sick,

Regards Charles

Charles

Appreciate your reply. Clearly this was an awful time for a 19 year-old trainee to join the Regiment. Obviously shells will kill and wound the experienced and those fresh to the front line: I wonder how long it took to become trench-savvy and improve the chances of survival?

Thanks again

Paul

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Paul,

Looks like he only spent 5 or 6 days on the front line the rest training and reorganizing. he would have taken part in the “Battle of BROODSEINDE” 3rd - 5th October.

Next day, 3rd October, the Battalion moved to Scottish Wood, the place from which they were to proceed to take part in the big operation which was to take place on 4th October.

Companies moved off towards the assembly position at 11 p.m. The first place was Glencorse Wood, along the famous Menin Road. Here the Battalion formed up, in spite of a bad spell of shelling on the way, during which the behaviour of all ranks was admirable.

Pushing on under great difficulties—the whole area was one huge bog—all Companies, except the Reserve Company, reached the assembly position shortly after 5 a.m. The Reserve Company had had to pass through a heavy enemy barrage, with the result that its two right platoons lost direction, became bogged in Polygon Beek, and eventually went over with the left of the 5th Division.

At zero hour, the Battalion which was in support advanced and gave assistance to the leading Battalion in the capture of the first objective, A further advance was made, and the second objective was also taken. This was ably reorganised by Capt. A. R. Case. German counter-attacks were observed forming up and dispersed. Capt. Case, although wounded, carried on for six hours, until at last compelled to proceed to the Dressing Station.

During the night Capt. W. C. Green did splendid work collecting stragglers from other Battalions, and filling up gaps with them in the line about Reutel Beek.

Pte. Heller, an officer’s servant, had be come detached from his Company, and in endeavouring to rejoin it, came upon a group of stragglers from other Regiments. These men were filling an important gap in the line, and no-one appeared to be in charge of them. It was evident the enemy were about to counter-attack, and Heller learned from the conversation of the men they were proposing to evacuate their position. Quickly appreciating the danger of the situation, Pte. Heller took charge of the Straggler Party, threatening to shoot any one of them who retired from his place, held the position against the attack, which shortly after came, and secured a number of prisoners. His example and fearlessness were splendid, and for his conduct he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, an honour he justly deserved,

Capt. Green was sent up on the after noon of the 5th October to take over the front line. This he ably reorganised into a system of posts and supports. A counter attack against the left of the 5th Division was in progress shortly after, and Capt. Green led his line forward, changing front half right, and bringing rifle and Lewis gun fire to bear with great effect on the enemy.

Capt. Rev. G. H. Crossland performed prodigies of useful work amongst the wounded under the most appalling and, dangerous conditions, and for his services or, this occasion was subsequently awarded the Military Cross. Lieut. A. D. Robinson was in charge of the Ration Party each evening, and experienced very trying times. He was wounded in the leg on the first trip to the line, but would not report until the last day the Battalion was in the front tine, when he had to proceed to Field Ambulance.

This was the first occasion “tump lines” were used for carrying rations, ammunition and other stores, but it is doubtful whether they were a real success, owing possibly to the lack of practice of the men, using them. The conditions under which the ration parties had to proceed were simply awful, and in addition all tracks were well covered by enemy shell fire. Of 40 men who comprised the party 30 were wounded during the journeys they made with their loads.

The Battalion was relieved on the night of 6-7th October, and came back to the Railway Embankment at Zillebeke, to which place the travelling kitchens and bits had been sent. The casualties sustained by the Battalion were unfortunately heavy. Three Officers—Lieuts. Ellwood and Crane and Second Lieut. Mintoft—were killed. ; Second Lieut. R. G. Howe was missing, and five Officers—Capt. Case, Lieut. Crowe, Second Lieuts. Rice, Jarvis, and Robinson—wounded. Of other ranks 36 were killed, 73 missing and 172 wounded. Amongst those killed and missing were Sgts. A. Tutt and G. Desborough, D.C.M., both of whom had been out the whole time with the Battalion, and had always proved themselves valuable and useful N.C.O.’s.

The honours gained in the Battalion were a; follows:—Military Cross: Capt. A. R. Case, Lieut. J. A. Oughtred, and Second Lieut. E. K. Parrish. Distinguished Conduct Medal: Pte. Heller. Bar to Military Medals. Sergt. Walker and Pte. McNeil. Military Medals: Pte. Lawrence (Transport), Ptes. London, J. Taylor, W. Brown, Sergt. T. Griffin, L.-Sergt. Jordan, Ptes. J. Sellers, F. J. Parker, T. Bellerby, A. H. Clucas, W. Dobson, and L.-Corpl. E. Longbottom.

Regards Charles

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Paul,

Looks like he only spent 5 or 6 days on the front line the rest training and reorganizing. he would have taken part in the “Battle of BROODSEINDE” 3rd - 5th October.

Next day, 3rd October, the Battalion moved to Scottish Wood, the place from which they were to proceed to take part in the big operation which was to take place on 4th October.

Companies moved off towards the assembly position at 11 p.m. The first place was Glencorse Wood, along the famous Menin Road. Here the Battalion formed up, in spite of a bad spell of shelling on the way, during which the behaviour of all ranks was admirable.

Pushing on under great difficulties—the whole area was one huge bog—all Companies, except the Reserve Company, reached the assembly position shortly after 5 a.m. The Reserve Company had had to pass through a heavy enemy barrage, with the result that its two right platoons lost direction, became bogged in Polygon Beek, and eventually went over with the left of the 5th Division.

At zero hour, the Battalion which was in support advanced and gave assistance to the leading Battalion in the capture of the first objective, A further advance was made, and the second objective was also taken. This was ably reorganised by Capt. A. R. Case. German counter-attacks were observed forming up and dispersed. Capt. Case, although wounded, carried on for six hours, until at last compelled to proceed to the Dressing Station.

During the night Capt. W. C. Green did splendid work collecting stragglers from other Battalions, and filling up gaps with them in the line about Reutel Beek.

Pte. Heller, an officer’s servant, had be come detached from his Company, and in endeavouring to rejoin it, came upon a group of stragglers from other Regiments. These men were filling an important gap in the line, and no-one appeared to be in charge of them. It was evident the enemy were about to counter-attack, and Heller learned from the conversation of the men they were proposing to evacuate their position. Quickly appreciating the danger of the situation, Pte. Heller took charge of the Straggler Party, threatening to shoot any one of them who retired from his place, held the position against the attack, which shortly after came, and secured a number of prisoners. His example and fearlessness were splendid, and for his conduct he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, an honour he justly deserved,

Capt. Green was sent up on the after noon of the 5th October to take over the front line. This he ably reorganised into a system of posts and supports. A counter attack against the left of the 5th Division was in progress shortly after, and Capt. Green led his line forward, changing front half right, and bringing rifle and Lewis gun fire to bear with great effect on the enemy.

Capt. Rev. G. H. Crossland performed prodigies of useful work amongst the wounded under the most appalling and, dangerous conditions, and for his services or, this occasion was subsequently awarded the Military Cross. Lieut. A. D. Robinson was in charge of the Ration Party each evening, and experienced very trying times. He was wounded in the leg on the first trip to the line, but would not report until the last day the Battalion was in the front tine, when he had to proceed to Field Ambulance.

This was the first occasion “tump lines” were used for carrying rations, ammunition and other stores, but it is doubtful whether they were a real success, owing possibly to the lack of practice of the men, using them. The conditions under which the ration parties had to proceed were simply awful, and in addition all tracks were well covered by enemy shell fire. Of 40 men who comprised the party 30 were wounded during the journeys they made with their loads.

The Battalion was relieved on the night of 6-7th October, and came back to the Railway Embankment at Zillebeke, to which place the travelling kitchens and bits had been sent. The casualties sustained by the Battalion were unfortunately heavy. Three Officers—Lieuts. Ellwood and Crane and Second Lieut. Mintoft—were killed. ; Second Lieut. R. G. Howe was missing, and five Officers—Capt. Case, Lieut. Crowe, Second Lieuts. Rice, Jarvis, and Robinson—wounded. Of other ranks 36 were killed, 73 missing and 172 wounded. Amongst those killed and missing were Sgts. A. Tutt and G. Desborough, D.C.M., both of whom had been out the whole time with the Battalion, and had always proved themselves valuable and useful N.C.O.’s.

The honours gained in the Battalion were a; follows:—Military Cross: Capt. A. R. Case, Lieut. J. A. Oughtred, and Second Lieut. E. K. Parrish. Distinguished Conduct Medal: Pte. Heller. Bar to Military Medals. Sergt. Walker and Pte. McNeil. Military Medals: Pte. Lawrence (Transport), Ptes. London, J. Taylor, W. Brown, Sergt. T. Griffin, L.-Sergt. Jordan, Ptes. J. Sellers, F. J. Parker, T. Bellerby, A. H. Clucas, W. Dobson, and L.-Corpl. E. Longbottom.

Regards Charles

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Charles

Great background and many thanks.

Cheers

Paul

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