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Remembered Today:

MG 08/18 in December 1917


robert_sfl
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A short question for the MG specialists.. this appears to be an MG 08/18 on a picture dated December 1917. Does that fit together - perhaps an early trial?

The front writing means "Erinnerung an den L.M.G.A.K. in Rembertow (?)". The abbreviation could stand for light MG Abteilung (unit), the "K." perhaps for "Klasse" or "Kurs" (training course). The back side contains a personal letter with another date January 5th, 1918, regretably not stamped.

mg0818_1.jpg

mg0818_2.jpg

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This would be an early photograph of an MG08/18, if that was what it was.However, the weapon in the picture is not an MG08/18 but a Bergmann LMG 15 n.A. It is a great picture, I think it is the first one I have seen of one actually with a unit.

The Bergmann LMG n.A. differed from the original Bergmann LMG 15 and its predecessors by firing from a closed bolt. Originally designed for air use it was relegated to infantry use by August 1916. It could use the belt drum and bipod of the MG08/15 and about 5,000 were made in WWI.

Regards

TonyE

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This would be an early photograph of an MG08/18, if that was what it was.However, the weapon in the picture is not an MG08/18 but a Bergmann LMG 15 n.A. It is a great picture, I think it is the first one I have seen of one actually with a unit.

The Bergmann LMG n.A. differed from the original Bergmann LMG 15 and its predecessors by firing from a closed bolt. Originally designed for air use it was relegated to infantry use by August 1916. It could use the belt drum and bipod of the MG08/15 and about 5,000 were made in WWI.

Regards

TonyE

The Bergaman n.A (which means simply new model) was issued for both infantry and air use at about the same time. There is some opaqueness as to whether it was specifically designed for air use. In the air it encountered difficulties as the G force produced by rapid manouvering could cause problems for the mechanism - especially the feed. The main diffeence between the air and ground models involves the mountings. The air models were fitted with new mountings and issued for ground use - alongside those already in infantry service. In ground service the gun was used mainly where lightness and ability to function in very in cold weather were needed. Hence some migrated to the Italian front for use in the mountains. A small number of these guns were also in use with the KuK air arm who like the German Fliegertruppen also encountered problems. These guns were also adapted for ground use and given to those KuK elements on the Italian front likely to be operating in conjunction with German Bergman armed units.

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The LMGAK most surely stands for 'Leichtes Maschinen Gewehr Ausbildungs Kursus'; I have several photos of the same weapon, one marked thus and 'Rembertow bei Warschau 5 nov 1917 - 17 dez. 1917 -

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