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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Columbine & Gunner


johnpetermoss

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Hi Pals,

I've been trawling thro' previous threads, HMS Columbine 1st. Feb. 2005 by KONDOA. and

Gunner 27th. Feb. 2006 by Yellow & spithead.

It fits in with my father's Service Certificate that has three consecutive entries :--

Columbine 229 AB 29th.Apl. 16 30th.Apl. 16 (initials unclear) Pocock

Gunner .. .. 1st.May 16 31st.Dec. 16

.. .. .. 1st. Jan 17 26th.Jan. 17

Where can I find details of any actions, information seems scattered.

Regards Peter

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Peter,

Amongst other things Columbine was an Auxiliary Patrol depot ship at Granton, Firth of Forth, being replaced by Gunner at Granton on 1st May 1916.

Shore Establishments of the Royal Navy, by Lt. Cdr. B. Warlow R.N.

David.

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Peter,

Amongst other things Columbine was an Auxiliary Patrol depot ship at Granton, Firth of Forth, being replaced by Gunner at Granton on 1st May 1916.

Shore Establishments of the Royal Navy, by Lt. Cdr. B. Warlow R.N.

David.

Hi David,

That fits exactly with the dates. Who would Pocock be Adj or Admin clerk

Thanks once again.

Just had a look on Wikipedia, whew didn't know they had so many!

Regards Peter

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Granton, other than an Auxiliary Patrol depot was also the test and training establishment for the Hydrophone.

Regards Charles

Hi Charles,

That gives me another line to check out, what period would that be or where might I find out more about the Hydrophone.

Regards Peter

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For the period in question, file ADM 218/80 and 218/103 at Kew. Hydrophones of the period were next to useless. The instrument did not become remotely viable until December 1917.

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hydrophone Oxford English Dictionary online

An instrument for the detection of sound by water; also of water, or of something in water, by sound. c. An instrument devised to give warning by electricity to a port or fleet of the approach of a hostile vessel.

Some files at Kew:

ADM 186/371 Instructions for use with Portable Hydrophones 1916

ADM 186/372 Experiments made in connection with Hydrophone service in 1915-16 1916

ADM 186/388 Instructions for use with portable hydrophones 1917

ADM 186/390 Notes on portable Directional Hydrophone Mark I 1917

ADM 186/404 Notes on submarine hunting using hydrophones 1918

ADM 218/1/1 Part 1 of piece containing photographs scientific naval technology and research: Folder contains photographs of hydrophones ... [1915-1917]

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For the period in question, file ADM 218/80 and 218/103 at Kew. Hydrophones of the period were next to useless. The instrument did not become remotely viable until December 1917.

Thank you Clio for that info, I've read some of the book suggested by "Joseph" and that seems to confirm your reply.

Peter

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Peter,

Have a read of this book, its a contemporary account of the development and use of Hydrophones;

http://www.archive.org/stream/hushorhydrop...age/n7/mode/2up

Regards Charles

Hi Charles, having read most of the book, I perhaps have as much idea how it works as the chap that wrote it.

It gives me the basic idea of the operation of the system and it's developement.

I suppose it's similar to RADAR when you see early film of the radar screen, then compare with modern sreens there's no comparison.

Regards Peter

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Peter,

As with most thing the development of Hydrophones once started, gained pace and eventually became a usfull tool.

Now depending on your fathers rank, service number, the ships he served on, usually in brackets and his ships book lists and numbers, could determine what sort of jobs he did whilst attached to Columbine and Gunner.

Regards Charles

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  • 3 weeks later...

quote name='joseph' date='Aug 8 2009, 04:56 PM' post='1240151']

Peter,

As with most thing the development of Hydrophones once started, gained pace and eventually became a useful tool.

Now depending on your fathers rank, service number, the ships he served on, usually in brackets and his ships book lists and numbers, could determine what sort of jobs he did whilst attached to Columbine and Gunner.

Regards Charles

Hi Charles, sorry I've not been back to you before now but perhaps this additional info might help with the sort of job he did.

I've managed to copy his service document and have noticed his last entries were President III DAMS, I hope it attaches OK.

It seems that he several post on this part of the GWF it would be difficult to find what ships he served on.

Like many threads family tales said he was shipwrecked three times but survived them all.

P.S. It seems he might have been on Duster when she broke free whilst being towed for a refit, she finish on the rocks a Scratten Cove, Portreath.

post-47259-1251299168.jpg[

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Peter,

Sorry, attachment to small to read.

Regards Charles

Hi Charles, I tried to send it via a PM but couldn't figure it out.

It's the original size (amount) that's the problem of the scan, I'll try and post the top half !!!

Peter

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Fabulous info John, many thanks for that, but how would that small ship travel to Australia? Just a Thought!

Peter

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quote name='Hallam Lad' date='Aug 27 2009, 09:08 AM' post='1252821']

Hi Charles, I tried to send it via a PM but couldn't figure it out.

It's the original size (amount) that's the problem of the scan, I'll try and post the top half !!!

Peter

post-47259-1251363374.jpg[

Here goes!!

Peter

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Peter,

Can make it out, looks like he was drafted to Columbine and was serving on Gunner, at that time acting as a decoy ship of the Firth of Forth working out of Granton.

Regards Charles

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Peter,

Can make it out, looks like he was drafted to Columbine and was serving on Gunner, at that time acting as a decoy ship of the Firth of Forth working out of Granton.

Regards Charles

Thanks Charles, that's what I thought.

Looks as tho' he had an interesting time, spithead mentions that Gunner twice engaged a U-Boat on 20th Aug. 1916.

After that he served on Duster ph0ebus gave me a Google link that said the ship broke away from a tow and finished on the rocks a Scratten Cove, Portreath.

Excellent was where he qualified in gunnery.

PresidentIII DAMS I have to research more.

This is the bare bones I need to now fill out the fleshy bits if possible.

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Where can I find details of any actions, information seems scattered.

Regards Peter

Peter

Some of Gunners actions can be found in the book 'Q-Ships' by Carson Richie.

A better picture of Gunner, possibly in WW11.

post-166-1251469932.jpg

Regards John

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Peter,

There is a contemporary account of the action on the 20 August 1916 in 'Q ships and their Story' E Keeble Chatterton page 237.

Regards Charles

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Peter

Some of Gunners actions can be found in the book 'Q-Ships' by Carson Richie.

A better picture of Gunner, possibly in WW11.

post-166-1251469932.jpg

Regards John

Many thanks John, quite a find, just can't make out the Q number on here.

Regards Peter

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Peter,

There is a contemporary account of the action on the 20 August 1916 in 'Q ships and their Story' E Keeble Chatterton page 237.

Regards Charles

Hi Charles, I was reading the book online last night, saw the first reference to the action but only got as far as page 200. It's very descriptive and well worth the read, written from experience.

The reference on pages 226 and 227 "The Admiralty decided to place a memorial tablet on board each merchant vessel...etc." sounds worth following up, have you heard about them?

Regards Peter

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Peter,

The H. C. Pocock who has signed off your father's Character & Ability as Commanding Officer of Gunner is Commander [Retired] Herbert C. Pocock.

His entry in the October 1915 Navy List is:-

COLUMBINE [Late Clyde]

Late Sloop.

FOR SPECIAL SERVICE

FIRTH OF FORTH

Commr. [Retd.] Herbert C. Pocock. 29 July 1914.

His entry in the December 1916 Navy List is:-

GUNNER, Admiralty Trawler

The following Officers are borne as additional

FOR DUTIES AT GRANTON NAVAL BASE

Commr. [Retd.] Herbert C. Pocock. 29 July 1914.

Regards,

David.

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