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Remembered Today:

Death of Dawyck, Earl Haig


IanA
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Dawyck Haig, son of the field marshal, has passed away, aged 91. He was a painter of some note and the guardian of his father's reputation. Thankfully, he had lived to see scholars refute the 'butcher and bungler' tag but was sad that his sisters had died before this had come about. He was a lovely man with an abiding interest in country pursuits and the management of the Bemersyde estate. Fortunately, he had published an account of his early life, his army career and imprisonment in Colditz, and his early development as an artist in 'My Father's Son' (Pen & Sword, 2000).

RIP Dawyck.

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It was his tragedy that being the son of Douglas Haig overshadowed his own life achievements, and indeed took him to Colditz as one of the "Prominente.". He was indeed a pleasant and unassuming man whom I met briefly once.

RIP.

Ron

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Haig II commented that his sisters had died while their father was still held in low esteem. I don`t know when they died but am guessing the 70s or 80s? What were the main factors that brought about the revision from that date?

And who inherits the title?

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The late Earl has a son. As for the revision of opinion, I think there was a new generation of historians who carried out new research and arrived at new conclusions. For some time now, research has moved on even further from personality and accorded more weight to operations, resources, tactics etc.

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  • 2 years later...

A headstone has recently been erected to mark the grave of Dawyck, 2nd Earl Haig. It is in red sandstone and is similar in style to that of his father with an attractive carving of the Eildon Hills, as viewed from Bemersyde - a view which meant so much to him and which he painted often. On the reverse of the stone is a simple cross.

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Fortunately, he had published an account of his early life, his army career and imprisonment in Colditz, and his early development as an artist in 'My Father's Son' (Pen & Sword, 2000).

RIP Dawyck.

Thanks,Ian.I've just read this (been a busy few years) & your post has saved a few questions.Thank you.

I wondered,with his age,what had he done in WW2 & was all bitter & twisted thinking,"he don't have the right to have a stone like that.His dad don't either,seeing as I've seen a couple of VC winners that ended up under clipped cornerstones".

I stand humbly corrected........As to his dad,well.I've listened & read but am still sat stoically on the fence.

Yeah,I know.

It's bigotry & indoctrination but,I trusted my Grandma & she hated everything about Haig.She often spoke of the upper echelon/remf mentality of Generals that hadn't seen mud or gas.

She too was of Great War ilk & probably the greatest influence in my life & she gained her insight from her brothers who came back.

This fence,Haigs fence,is starting to pain me.

I can't decide...

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Now then Mr Numbers, come down off that there fence at once. And you a martyr to your piles too!

This, of course, is not the place to discuss the merits of Britain's greatest general - there are plenty of foam-flecked threads which you could resurrect if you wish to stir up trouble. :o

Dawyck's headstone has nothing to do with the CWGC and, I suspect, is of that shape in order to conform to the others in that plot. I think there was some discussion between Lady Haig and Historic Scotland (who manage Dryburgh Abbey).

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