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Remembered Today:

Which Bn 7th or 8th Worcesters


boopig

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Hi

I am probably asking a stupid question, but havent got a clue how to find out. I wish to research as much as I can about my husbands great uncle who was killed in action in 1917. I know that he was in the Worcestershire regiment, his number being 2057. He then became a member of the 144th Machine Gun Corp, his number 21079. Found out today that that was part of the 48th Division. What i dont know is which Battalion of the worcesters he was in, the 7th or the 8th. I would really appreciate any help or pointers of which direction to go into to find out.

Thanking everyone in anticipation

Julie

boopig

Posts: 1

Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2009 2:16 pm

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Hi Julie

Welcome to the GWF!

What was your relative's name - and rank if possible, though that's not vital.

Regards

Ken

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Hi Julie

I've quickly cobbled together from various sources the following:

21079, Private Alexander Winterbottom

144th Machine Gun Company (Infantry)

144th Battalion, 48th ‘1st South Midland’ Division

(Formerly 2057, Private, 1/7th or 1/8th (Territorial Force) Battalion, the Worcestershire Regiment) – both battalions were with 144th Brigade of 48th Division, so when Alexander transferred to the Machine Gun Corps he was not far from his mates in the Worcesters. [As yet I cannot tell which battalion he was in – this might be found from the actual Medal Rolls at the National Archives in Kew, London or you might have to hope that his service records are there when the letter ‘W’ is reached on Ancestry.com.]

Born in Manchester. Lancashire, the son of Caroline E. Horton (formerly Winterbottom), of 23, Oldbury Rd., Smethwick, Staffs, and the late Alexander Winterbottom.

Lived in Oldbury, Worcestershire; enlisted in Smethwick.

144th Battalion, 48th ‘1st’ South Midland Division, Actions & Engagements:

1/7th and 1/8th Worcestershire battalion landed in Boulogne, France on 31st March 1915 with other units of 48th Division.

Battles of the Somme (July – November 1916): 1/7/16 Battle of Albert; 15-17/7/16 Battle of Bazentin (including 17/7/16 Capture of Ovillers); 23-27/7/16 and 13-28/8/16 Battle of Pozières Ridge; 3-11/11/16 Battle of the Ancre Heights; 13-18/11/16 Battle of the Ancre.

14/3/17-5/4/17 German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line (Somme sector), including 18/3/17 Occupation of Péronne

[More detail of exactly where the two Worcesters battalions and the 144th MGCoy were and what they did will be found in their respective ‘War Diaries’ – the record kept by every unit on war service].

Killed in action (probably on regular trench-holding duties) on 10th April 1917 and buried in plot D.63 of Villers-Faucon Communal Cemetery, near Péronne, Somme France.

[Villers-Faucon is a village about 12 kilometres north-east of Péronne. The Cemetery is situated north of the village on the road to Guyencourt-Saulcourt. Villers-Faucon was captured by the 5th Cavalry Division on 27 March 1917, lost on 22 March 1918, and retaken by the III Corps on 7 September 1918. The Commonwealth graves in the COMMUNAL CEMETERY are those of soldiers who died in February- August 1917, or (in the case of two who are buried in Row B) in September 1918. They were made by the cavalry, the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division, and other fighting troops. The communal cemetery contains 227 First World War burials, five of them unidentified, and 91 German graves. The adjoining EXTENSION was begun in April 1917 and used until March 1918. It was then used by the Germans, and Commonwealth burials were resumed in September and October 1918. Further Commonwealth graves were brought in after the Armistice from a wide area round Villers-Faucon. The extension contains 459 Commonwealth burials and commemorations of the First World War. 144 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to six casualties believed to be buried among them. The extension also contains 66 German graves. The Commonwealth plots were designed by Sir Herbert Baker.]

Entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

Hope this helps a bit.

Regards

Ken

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HI Ken

I cannot thank you enough for what you have found out for me, it is so good of you, didnt think in a million years i would get so much info back. I can now find out more hopefully, will be on the look out for the W's at ancestry when they are finally put on there...trust me to have a relative at the end of the alphabet!!!. Will be a bit busy now finding out more but at least it will keep me quiet.

Thanks again

Julie

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Hi Gary

Thank you so much for taking the time and trouble to post Alexanders medal card , everyone has been so kind and helpful on this forum I cannot thank you enough. Will be able to carry on researching now with all this info.

Many thanks

Julie

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Hi Julie

Glad you're happy!

If there's anything you're not sure about, don't be afraid to ask.

Best regards

Ken

PS: I don't know why the smiley face appeared in the previous posting but it should read 'Row B'!

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