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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

what does a coy refer to?


Peter furness

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I have my great grandfathers compass from ww1. The leather case has the following: "J Furness - W Coy - 19th DLI"

What does the coy part mean/refer to?

Apologies if this is a silly question.

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The formation of 'Coy' is unusual as English abbreviations go. Is there a history to it?

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Interesting Regiment the 19th DLI (Formed as "Bantams" - 5ft-5ft 3in)

Service:

1916 Bazentin, Somme.

1917 Ypres.

1918 Albert, Somme, Ypres, Courtrai.

- they were certainly in the thick of it!

Colin

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The formation of 'Coy' is unusual as English abbreviations go. Is there a history to it?

I wonder if it was used to distinguish from CO ?

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CO or Corps, perhaps.

Actually, thinking about it, using the first couple of letters and the final letter of the word as an abbreviation is not that unusual, it's more that the resulting abbreviation just 'looks funny'.

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Around 1980 the U.S. Army had to decide whether RTO stood for Radio-Telephone Operator or Rail Transport Officer. There were tens of thousands of guys talking on radios and telephones and once upon a blue moon a few of the rail transport variety. The latter retained the official acronym because it was the first to be given the abbreviation during the Great War. My belief is that American military acronyms were a curse learned from the British army in 1917-1918.

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aye - from what my family knows he was wounded at ypres (shrapnel wounds to his leg) and came home. We know he signed up at brancepeth castle, but dont know any dates. All we have is 2 photos of him in uniform and his compass and his medals.

Interesting Regiment the 19th DLI (Formed as "Bantams" - 5ft-5ft 3in)

Service:

1916 Bazentin, Somme.

1917 Ypres.

1918 Albert, Somme, Ypres, Courtrai.

- they were certainly in the thick of it!

Colin

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Because we do not often refer to commanding officers in civvy street.

The " standard" abbreviation for "company" is not "Co" - it is "Co." and the abbreviation for Commanding Officer is not "Co", it is "CO" or "C.O." If one uses "Co" or "co", it implies "with" - as in co-habiting or co-existing. Hence, the abbreviation of "Coy", to prevent confusion where it might be inferred to mean "with". As it is past my bedtime in Toronto, please don't ask me to give an example of when that might happen. I'm tired enough trying to remember what was taught to me by my old English master, "Baggy" Aston :D

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From a War Diary.

12th March 1919-Comdg. Officer proceeds home for demobilization.

George

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Could refer to mistresses - a Marvellous usage.

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Could refer to mistresses - a Marvellous usage.

Wicked man :o

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