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Remembered Today:

Don't be angry only wonder?


Vista52
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I want to use this in a post on another forum. I seem to remember something about it being written on a wall in Bapaume in 1918 after the German retreat. Can someone confirm and elaborate?

Thanks.

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It's quite a famous photo - "Nicht Argern, nur Wundern!" painted on a wooden board... on Peronne town hall.

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Thanks Croonaert....I was hoping you would include the Original German. Thanks again.

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The sign was put up during the Alberich Bewegung; i.e. the withdrawal to the Siegfriedstellung/Hindenburg Line in March 1917. Photographs of it exist, but I cannot remember where offhand, otherwise I would post one.

Jack

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Jack & Gary....thank you. I have the whole picture now...when and where ;)

It's actually very clever, don't you think.

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The sign itself still exisits, in the Historial at Peronne.

Mick

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It's actually very clever, don't you think.
Not when you consider what happened during Alberich Bewegung. Leaving aside the destruction and the booby traps, the most difficult and disturbing account that I have read from the Great War (and, as everyone knows, there are lots of difficult and disturbing accounts) was Spears' description of the French refugees who were 'rescued' during the German withdrawal. It is in his book 'Prelude to Victory'.

Robert

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The sign itself still exisits, in the Historial at Peronne.

I believe the sign in the Historial is a reproduction made by the IWM when it was at Crystal Palace - I am told that if you compare it with the contemporary photos the two are not the same.

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Not a good reproduction then. Any idea when it got to the historial because i have neem going for a few years and have sworn I never noticed it before.

Mick

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Robert is right on the money. The tactics and methods employed during the Alberich Bewegung were highly controversial - amongst the Germans. Crown Prince Rupprecht, an honourable man if ever there was one, was adamantly opposed to the scorched earth tactics and threatened to resign over it. He was only persuaded (with great difficulty) that it was his overriding duty as a German officer to stay at his ppst.

Jack

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I have seen the picture in books but always taken from a somewhat different perspective or angle, 'en face' so to speak.

The picture I mean was on display in the Historial or the mairie of Péronne in April. Part of the exhibition of photos was also in a lycée there.

All the best,

Fred

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Jack & Gary....thank you. I have the whole picture now...when and where ;)

It's actually very clever, don't you think.

Just to be clear, my use of the word "clever" was only meant to reference that a German Soldier wrote such a profound and ambiguous statement in the middle of all that destruction. "Don't be angry, only wonder"!!

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Wundern can also be translated as "to be surprised," and "to be amazed," which is how Edwin Campion Vaughan translated it in Some Desperate Glory, I believe.

"Don't be angry, just be surprised."

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