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Bethune Military Hospital


paul001
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I have recently picked-up the trail on my Great Great Uncle who served with the 40th Division of the RFA (A-bty, 188th Brigade) and died from wounds in Bethune Military Hospital during August 1916.

I think he was fighting at Loos, although I have yet to confirm this.

I also understand that the Hospital was damaged by a shell during August 1916, but again am sketchy around any firther details.

I am eager to learn more about Bethune Hospital, particularly anything surrounding 1916 and would be grateful for any information.

Regards,

Paul,

Nottingham.

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Paul

I don't think there was ever a military hospital at Bethune during the war. I'm not at home at present, but from memory think that it was No.33 Casualty Clearing Station that was there for virtually the whole of the war - does this sound likely from the information you have?

Sue

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A Casualty Clearing Station at Bethune was shelled on the 7th August 1916 resulting in the award of Military Medals to a number of nurses. I'm not sure which one but I'm sure Sue will come up with the full info for you.

Aled

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The only CCS in Bethune at that time was No.33 CCS. It was always rather susceptible to shelling, and on 7th August 1916 a fifteen-pounder went through the building in the vicinity of the operating theatre, causing considerable damage. There were five military medals awarded to members of the nursing staff:

Mabel Tunley, QAIMNS, the Sister-in-Charge

Beatrice Allsop, QAIMNS Reserve

Norah Easeby, QAIMNS Reserve

Ethel Hutchinson, QAIMNS Reserve

Jean Whyte, Territorial Force Nursing Service

It was hit again on the 7th December 1917, and resulted in another two military medals to nursing sisters:

Mary Foley, QAIMNS

Mabel Jennings, Territorial Force Nursing Service

I have put all the citations for these women here (and on the next page):

Military Medals to members of QAIMNS/TFNS

No.33 Casualty Clearing Station has a war diary at The National Archives for the whole period it was in use during the war, reference WO95/254.

Sue

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  • 6 years later...

I know this is an old post but I've just been reading about the Civil and Military Hospital Bethune and found this post.

Battle of Loos Sept 1915. The 29th Field Ambulance evacuated wounded on the 25/09/1915 to various CCS/hospitals including 33 CCS. ADS at Sailly-labourse, Vermelles, Barts and Guys.

At 4.00pm on the 25/09/1915 they handed over to the 85th FA and moved to 'Civil and Military Hospital Bethune' as per diary entry.

Odd that they spent the day evacuating men to 33 CCS then at 4pm call the same thing the 'Civil and Military Hospital Bethune'. Shame there doesn't seem to be a diary for 33 CCS Sept 1915.

TEW

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There might be reference in the RAMC divisional diary.

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I have diaries for 1st Div ADMS, 9th Div ADMAS, 29th FA, 27th FA (both 9th Div). Evacuation procedure well noted, types of wound etc. Locations of ADS, bearer posts, RAP, Div collection stations all easily plotted out.

But, my 1st Div man (3rd Bde.) died of gas poisoning while with 29th FA on 27th Sept 1915. He can only have suffered from gas on the 25th Sept and as the 29th FA handed over to 85th FA at 4.pm 25th. He must have been in their hands by then?

If the 29th FA moved to 'Civil and Military Hospital Bethune' aka 33 CCS after 4pm on 25th, surely my man should be recorded as dying with the 33 CCS.

Unless he was recorded as admitted to 29th FA on 25th Sept and became a transfer to the 85th FA at an ADS.

How would the admissions and discharge register (MH106) deal with admissions and discharges if an entire FA handed over to another one complete with lots of wounded.?

I suppose he may have been at 33 CCS until 27th Sept and then died while being evacuated further back while with 29th FA

Will be checking 85th FA diary tuesday, so may be able to answer my own question.

TEW

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At 4.00pm on the 25/09/1915 they handed over to the 85th FA and moved to 'Civil and Military Hospital Bethune' as per diary entry.

Odd that they spent the day evacuating men to 33 CCS then at 4pm call the same thing the 'Civil and Military Hospital Bethune'. Shame there doesn't seem to be a diary for 33 CCS Sept 1915.

TEW

In 1914, shortly after the Battle of Aisne, the 15th Field Ambulance went to Bethune and was ordered to act as a CCS until a CCS arrived. They set up in a school but were very quickly overrun with casualties. Lt A A Martin (later Maj A A Martin, NZMC) went in search of another building to hold more wounded. In the centre of the town he found L’Hopital Civil et Militaire. He states:-

“It was a hospital of three stories, built of brick round three sides of a big hollow square. The fourth side was occupied by the porter’s lodge, the two gateways, and the residential quarters of the Reverend Mother and Sisters of the Order of St. Francis, who formed the nursing staff. The basement wards of one wing were for French military patients, and the other wings were for civilian patients; but as a matter of fact military wounded were put in all the wards except the midwifery ward........... The top story of the hospital had two large empty wards, each capable of holding seventy patients placed fairly closely together. I asked permission of the Reverend Mother and the hospital secretary to use these wards for the reception of our wounded. “But yes,” I was eagerly told; “you are welcome, and we shall do all we can for your English wounded.” I was also offered the use of three side-rooms and part of another small ward for any wounded officer, and - greatest boon of all - the use of the two operating theatres of the hospital.”

A couple of days later a CCS arrived and set up in a college. A A Martin wrote “The position in Bethune was now as follows. One Clearing Hospital at the College for Young Ladies, one at the school “Jules Ferry,” and my surgical wards, only for serious cases, at L’Hospital Civil et Militaire.”

I would hazard a guess that the medical services continued to use these wards, and this is the civil and military hospital everyone is referring to...

Barbara

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What was the CCS at Bethune during May 1915?

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What was the CCS at Bethune during May 1915?

From February to May 1915, the 4th, 5th and 6th Field Ambulances were in Bethune. The 4th had their main dressing station in the French civil and military hospital. The 6th London Field Ambulance was also there from April to May 1915. Their HQ and main dressing station was set up in at a school in Rue Michelet but they had to move back a bit due to constant shelling.

I haven’t come across any CCSs being there between January 1915 and September 1915, when No 1 CCS moved out and No 33 CCS moved in. With such a large Field Ambulance presence though, maybe it was too close to the fighting, at that time, for CCSs to be there.

Barbara

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Very interesting as both Jules ferry and ecole de jeaune fille are both mentioned. Will re read diaries I have for the context. Also ecole paul Bart. They also had ADSs at barts and guys. Barts is mapped, 36cnw1.

TEW

Edited by TEW
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  • 6 months later...

Captain F H Mahony Cheshire Regiment died of wounds 22 oct 1914 at Bethune hospital and was buried at Bethune graveyard.He`s service revolver is now in my hands.

 

Peter

Webley revolvers 006.JPG

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