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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Bayoneted?


Skipman
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The look like alphanumeric notations B70 & B75 plus the fact that the ditto markings under GSW suggest just that.

Regards

Mel

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I read the ditto marks as meaning those are gunshot wounds as well. the B+number is a reference to the source of the information.

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Mike

He was wounded quite a few times during that month. 4 times I think. GSW or GunShot Wound meant more than a shooting. Shrapnel and splinters were also classed as GSWs. :)

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Thanks guys'n'gals. He was in the thick of it.

Alex MacNaughton 52nd CEF His brother John Daniel MacNaughton was also killed, serving in the 1/5th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.

Mike.

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"Mike

He was wounded quite a few times during that month. 4 times I think. GSW or GunShot Wound meant more than a shooting. Shrapnel and splinters were also classed as GSWs."

Geraint,

Not strictly true. I think the medical report on the soldier would classify the identity and nature of his wound with greater detail than which you purport. In addition to asking the casualty how he received his wounds, as early as the Boer War, British military surgeons were quite aware of the different pathophysiologies of: high-velocity bullets*, low-velocity bullets, large bullets (Pom-Poms), shrapnel bullets, and shrapnel shards - plus any additional shipyard-confetti being blasted about. Shrapnel bullets and low-velocity bullets were often retained in the wound (as were ricochets and/or their fragmentary parts), due to their tendency to be aerodynamically inefficient. The nature of a wound produced by shrapnel shards often made them immediately identifiable. Basically, the amount of kinetic energy in the mass being propelled, and its shape, had a large effect on the type of wound received - along with where it struck, and the cross-sectional thickness & density of what it has to pass through. Concerning this, a shrapnel bullet gives a different entrance wound to that of a high-velocity bullet. Bear in mind though, that a high-velocity bullet, that has lost a great part of its inertia, is also likely to be retained. Also, a high-velocity bullet tends to indurate the entrance area. There is a wealth of pre-war information concerning this subject in: Colonel W F Stevenon's book Wounds in War, 1910; and Sir George Henry Makins's book Surgical Experiences in South Africa 1899-1900.

*When I refer to high-velocity bullet, I mean that which is fired from a rifle or machine-gun.

Aye

Tom McC

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If they were indeed woundings from bullets then surely they can only have been grazes? If he had received penetrating bullet wounds then I would have expected him to have been taken out of action until healed. Here we are looking at 4 woundings over the best part of only two weeks. (And I guess equally applicable if splinter or shrapnel wounds).

Edit:

But now I have just re-read the original entries. Is this not in fact all one event - wounded in various places, and the dates refer to transfers to various medical facilities? Wimereux, Lincoln, Bear Woods (Wokingham)? If indeed wounding from one event then it is unlikely he was wounded four times from bullets in such diverse places and only grazed (he was back on strength the following month). It sounds more like splinters/sharpnel...

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I think you are right Ian. I would imagine when seen immediately after the wounds, it would be difficult to tell exactly what they were, and labelled Gunshot wounds. As he got further back the wound would be cleaned and a more accurate diagnosis could be made.

He was injured 4th June shrapnel from a shell. I was unsure if he had been 'bayoneted' He died in 1919 in Canada with war related injuries.

Cheers Mike

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Mike

There you have it - these were his injuries from the shrapnel shell. As mentioned already, they were uniformly described as gunshot wounds, irrespective of whether caused by bullets or not.

Ian

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Ian

Re-reading again - he was wounded four in six places. Must have been light grazes - he's back on strength within a few days.

13. 6 in left hand and right arm

15. 6 in head

22. 6 in left hand (could be ref to wound on 13. 6)

23. 6 Back on strength

2. 7 GSW head and arm

7. 7 Back on strength

Tom

I'm certain that GSW was a quick shorthand notation for any penetrative wound caused by a fired weapon!

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Hi Geraint and Ian.

I have the man's full service record. I'm not very good at reading them so can post more of it if that helps.

Cheers Mike

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No, I think he weas wounded on 4th June in the various places all at once.

The dates are his admission to the various hospitals:

5 June at Wimereux

9 June Folkestone

11 June Lincoln

18 June Wokingham

Ian

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