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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Old rank


centurion

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There used to be a rank of Corporal Major. There is a photo of the Life Guards Corporal Majors in 1861 with four stripes and a crown on their sleeves. What was the equivalent in WW1? Was there any vestige of it left?

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There were a couple of ad hoc posts Centurion, with no official recognition, but were part of the esprit de corps. Think about the Goat Major in the RWF battalions. There was no official rank, and the Goat Major was always a Lance Corporal/Corporal. But try telling any RWFer that there was no such post as a Goat Major!

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My great uncle was a Squadron Corporal Major during WW1 with the 2nd Life Guards if this helps.

Andy

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The rank of corporal major continues to exist in today's Household Cavalry and equates to sergeant major. Regimental Corporal Major is the same as RSM and squadron corporal major to CSM.

Charles M

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... and "Corporal of Horse" for ordinary sergeant.

The Household Cavalry have never (I think) used sergeant or any of its derivatives as even the lowliest members of the regiments were regarded as gentlemen, and sergeant comes from the Latin serviens, basically meaning a servant.

Ron

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Thanks guys - that explains the four stripes and the crown - I was wondering what a sgt major would have had! - Eight stripes? Another ancient relic - I believe that Private originated from Private Gentleman in the days when the lowest ranked fighting man had a servant to carry his gear.

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Household Cavalry retained the old NCO nomenclature from the days when what we refer to as cavalry were known as regiments of horse.

I did write to the Household Cavlry Museum about their NCO ranks and insignia in WW1 in January 2007 with two 6 monthly reminders sent as well. I have still to receive a reply.

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... and "Corporal of Horse" for ordinary sergeant.

The Household Cavalry have never (I think) used sergeant or any of its derivatives as even the lowliest members of the regiments were regarded as gentlemen, and sergeant comes from the Latin serviens, basically meaning a servant.

Ron

I had read somewhere that it was because Queen Victoria herself thought the word somewhat unbecoming...I always assumed it was a myth as she hadnt changed the name of the Common Serjeant of London who was a judicial appointment in her name

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... and "Corporal of Horse" for ordinary sergeant.

The Household Cavalry have never (I think) used sergeant or any of its derivatives as even the lowliest members of the regiments were regarded as gentlemen, and sergeant comes from the Latin serviens, basically meaning a servant.

Ron

Ron

And there was I as proud as punch the day I was promoted to 'Servant'

:D

Paul

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Household Cavalry retained the old NCO nomenclature from the days when what we refer to as cavalry were known as regiments of horse.

I did write to the Household Cavlry Museum about their NCO ranks and insignia in WW1 in January 2007 with two 6 monthly reminders sent as well. I have still to receive a reply.

Squirel,

Try this for size Household Cavalry badges of rank

Kind regards

Woolly

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Squirrel,

No problem. See, I spelt your username write this time!

Woolly

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