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12 pounder shell markings


diverdad
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Hello, this is my first post on this forum, please be gentle!!

I am researching an unknown shipwreck and I have a question about the markings on the bottom of a 12 pounder (empty) shell that I have recovered, (and declared to receiver of wrecks).

The picture I have taken is too big to post on this site so I will describe it; The shell casing is laid down on its side and I am looking at the bottom, I will describe the features like if it were a clock.

(12o'clock) It has "12PR 12cwt" stamped across the top it has an "I" stamped just under this.

(4 o'clock) It has the broad arrow and a capital N directly under it.

(6 o'clock) The numbers 1917 (I am assuming this is the date of manufacture)?

(7 o'clock) A large O and immediately a smaller capital F

(9 o'clock) letters LOT and numbers 44 directly under.

If anyone could shed some light as to the meaning of these numbers etc I would be very greteful.

Thanks in advance

Lee

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Lee,

(12o'clock) It has "12PR 12cwt" stamped across the top it has an "I" stamped just under this.

Caliber of the ammo "12 pounder 12 centiweigt the letter "I" have to look up

(4 o'clock) It has the broad arrow and a capital N directly under it.

Britisch broad arrow letter "N" have to look up but i think Navy

(6 o'clock) The numbers 1917 (I am assuming this is the date of manufacture)?

Indeed date of manufacture

(7 o'clock) A large O and immediately a smaller capital F

Have to look up

(9 o'clock) letters LOT and numbers 44 directly under.

Lot number 44

Vince

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12 cwt means 12 "hundredweight" -- the weight of the gun. There were 112 pounds to a hundredweight (another sign the Brits should never be trusted to come up with systems of measure or currency -- what use is a stone?!?!).

The 12cwt gun was the low velocity 12pdr used in most ships (destroyers, etc). There was an 18cwt model used in large ships that really wanted a 4-in gun (HMS Dreadnought being an example)

8 and even 4 cwt guns existed for other purposes.

the 12 cwt would have been mounted on one of these mountings:

S II, P III (on a battleship, cruiser or light cruiser)

P I, P V, P VI (on a destroyer)

tone

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Markings are as explained above, except the large "O" with small "F" is actually a "C". "CF means it is filled with Cordite, Full Charge.

Regards

TonyE

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Centiweight=hundredweight........... it equals a short Hundredweight 100lbs

The Royal Navy used the Hundredweight used in England from 1340 which is 112lbs and still is.

Regards Charles

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the 12 cwt would have been mounted on one of these mountings:

S II, P III (on a battleship, cruiser or light cruiser)

P I, P V, P VI (on a destroyer)

The wreck is WW1 era and appears to be and armed merchant ship or Q ship but I am not sure which.

I have a few possibles but I am keeping mum at the moment!

The sad thing is that this large ship is sat on the seabed , is marked on charts by the looks of it came to a very violent end (more than likley with fatalities) and nobody even knows the name or how it came to be there.

Thanks

Lee

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Thanks to all who have responded to my post.

I am really glad I have found this forum, my research is now regaining momentum again!

I have another one for you!

I will start it of on another post called "can anyone tell me what this is?"

Thanks

Lee.

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