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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

THOMAS AUGUSTUS HOWARD


foureyes

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Can anyone help, please? 552678 Rfn Thomas Augustus HOWARD is listed on the CWGC as having died on 20 Jun 1920 (repeat 1920). He is buried in Highgate Cemetery, London.

His documents show that he enlisted on 2 Sep 1914 and served with 2nd/19th City of London Regiment in the UK until November 1916 when he transferred to 16th Bn City of London Regiment. He was then posted to Salonika, arriving in November 1916. He returned to the UK in March 1919 and was discharged on 12 May 1919. His documents show normal service with one very minor charge and two short stays in hospital for minor illnesses. On discharge he signed a form stating that he had no illnesses or wounds resulting from his Army service.

One possibility that occurred to me is that he might have re-enlisted and died in some other campaign, but I can find no evidence of this.

There is nothing in his papers to indicate date, place or cause of death, but a 1922 letter to his father concerning his Victory Medal shows that the Army Record Office was aware that he had died.

So, my question is, how could a soldier be listed as an official "war death" 19 months after the war had ended and 12 months after he had left the Army? Help, please!

David

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The registration index for his death certificate appears to be:

June Quarter 1920

Howard, Thomas A Age 29 District Pancras Volume 1b page 68

If you order the certificate from the GRO it will give a cause of death which may shed some light.

Doug

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Hi David,

In a lot of case's men died many years after the end of the War from wounds received. Take Eamonn Holmes from the "My Family at War" programme on BBC last night, his Grandfather was wounded at Boesinghe, Belgium in 1917, and lived till 1955, on his death cert. it stated he died from toxaemia [blood poisoning] due to an ulceration of his abdominal wound from WW1.

Peter

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