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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Southern Irish Regiments


Soren

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Hi Pal's,

As I said, I'm busy composing drawings and prints at the moment, I often find that asking people what their favourite action/accounts is the best way to get the the ideas flowing.

I've neglected the Southern Irish Regints of late and thought I'd ask the Pal's for their personal favourites.

Many thanks in advance

Soren

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Not strictly Southern Irish.....The 16th and 36th Divisions side by side at Messines June 1917.

Again not Southern Irish.....1/18th Battalion the London Regiment, London Irish Rifles, at Loos 25th september 1915 - the first time that a football was kicked over the top and in to the German trenches. They were wearing gas hoods at the time as well.

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soren, i suppose the last absolution of the munsters, must rank as a very emotional and also very striking feelings of troops before going into a battle or action that probably all had their doubts about their fate at the end. then there is the account of the dublin fusiliers at mouse trap farm ,where they lost heavely. cheers,..mike.

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Maybe I'm supposed to be a PAL to answer this? Anyway I thought, There's a Devil in the Drum by J.F.Lucy about 2nd Btn. Royal Irish Rifles is a great book about guys from southern Ireland who fought.

Southern Ireland lost about the same number of soldiers as Canada, even more I think; over 67,000. I was surprised to learn of these numbers at the Irish park near Messines. Being connected with family in Ireland and having been there many times, I'm fairly positive that the vast majority of southern Irish people do not know a thing about this nor do they want to know about it. I've brought it up.

Bonfire

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The Dublins and Munsters at Helles, The Munsters at Etreux 1914,The Royal Irish at le Phily 1914,Connaught Rangers at Kabak Kuyu,Gallipoli 1915 are some more actions that come to mind,also Guillemont and Ginchy 1916.In response to Bonefire,I think awareness is increasing in Ireland rapidly,new memorials are being erected, numerous books have been written,and official rememberance services are held in more and more towns.Because of our past history Irish men in the british army were never going to get the same recognition that servicemen in other nations received,I call Irish involvement in the great war a hidden history which is now been revealed.More and more Irish people who research family trees are now finding a relative in the British forces.

Beat Regards,

Murrough.

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I think you have hit it on the nail Murrough, it is a hidden gem, and the more Irish people that start looking up their family history, the more they will find that somewhere in the past there is a connection to the Great War, I know that I did, and it has opened up a whole new interest to me.

Peter

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Thanks Guys, definately given me some material to look into!

the reason I aske dthe question is that my attention has been brought to these regiments as I'm seeing more and more visitors from the republic in Ypres, so I thought it was about time that I produced some work on them.

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Thanks Guys, definately given me some material to look into!

the reason I aske dthe question is that my attention has been brought to these regiments as I'm seeing more and more visitors from the republic in Ypres, so I thought it was about time that I produced some work on them.

dont forget the stand of the royal irish regiment cooks and bandsmen at la bascule crossroads in mons which kept the neck of the salient open

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dont forget the stand of the royal irish regiment cooks and bandsmen at la bascule crossroads in mons which kept the neck of the salient open

This sounds interesting any more info? thanks for a constructive post.

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What's with the "Southern Ireland" bit? It's Ireland.

Okay, Chris, if you're going to nit-pick, it's Eire. So there!

Bonfire

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Only Eire if you are conducting everything in Gaelic.

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