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Remembered Today:

Model Tommy 1917


alex falbo
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This project has been long and intense. This 1/6th recreation is the beggining of a collection Tommies and Fritz's. I posted the topic here because I would like critiques and such from the Old Sweats on this forum.

This is Sergeant Edward Carlysle of the No. 1 Platoon A Coy, 2nd Btn Manchester Regiment in 1917. He is an Old Contemptable and 'out since Mons'. (not an actual soldier)

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I've made the Gor Blimey from scratch. He's equipped with the standard and highly desired P08 webbing in battle order. The webbing and cartridge carriers are made from scratch as well. The Brodie helmet with hessian covering and SD uniform have been painted to look slightly damp. A leather jerkin has also been added.

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He also wears a knit scarf sent over by Mum. The Gorblimey needs a regimental badge so I'm waiting on one now.

He is also carrying the box respirtator.

Here we see his overseas cheverons. The SMLE MkIII was converted to the ealier pattern with the circular firing hammer

and stock disc.

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I'll post a few more pictures but let me know what you think.

Kind Regards,

Alex

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Can't tell if he's got it or not, but officially at least, a PH hood was still supposed to be carried as a 'back up' for the SBR until February (IIRC) 1918

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How can he be in 'No. 1 Platoon 2nd Coy'? He is either in 1 Platoon A Coy or did you perhaps mean 5 platoon B Coy?

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We really are nitpicking here! But - wouldn`t he have to wait till 1918 before he could have 4 overseas chevrons up? Nice model though - how big is he?

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The 34th Division memorial at Monchy-le-Preux, east of Arras, depicts three Tommies from April 1917. It may help you with some of the details.

Ron

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God, I was looking for the model. I thought the first posting included a photograph...... Then realised it was the model....

Very well done Alex.

Susan

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My absolute sincerest apologies for the Company designation mess up. I did mean A Coy.

The criticisms are very welcome and I appreciate the feedback. This project isn't finished but the attention

to the craftwork took my eye off some of the details.

As for the PH helmet. I'm making one now as no 1/6th manufacturer has made anyhting close to it. It'll will

have to be another scratch build.

Again I would like to thank you all for your compliments and critiques. This is my first model on the subject.

Alex

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At present I'm deciding how I wish to make them as I don't have the tools to actually cast them. So perhaps I could carve them from wood and paint them a metallic silver.

As for 1/6 its the size of Action Man or GI Joe. A 12 inch figure represents a ft tall person. Its difficult to make a Tommy since the parts are scarce. A sizable portion of clothing and equipment was scratch built and modified.

Thank you Peter for the suggestions. Here are a few more photos.

A rear view of the battle order/ needs a mess tin.

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Edward getting ready to hurl a No. 5 Mills

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I've also given him a good conduct badge and wound stripe

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Keep nitpicking!

Kind Regards,

Alex

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The left hand (to the user) set of ammo pouches need retaining straps on the lower three - this was introduced in late 1914/early 1915 as when leaning on a parapet to fire the rifle, it was found that the lower pouches became undone and the chargers of .303 would spill out. I'd imagine that earlier sets of ammo pouches would have been retro-fitted with retaining straps, but would need someone with better knowledge of webbing than me to confirm if that was the case

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Congratulations! Until I read all the postings I thought what you had done was put together a kit for yourself. I'd no idea it was 1/6 scale! Well done indeed! Cheers, Bill

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The left hand (to the user) set of ammo pouches need retaining straps on the lower three - this was introduced in late 1914/early 1915 as when leaning on a parapet to fire the rifle, it was found that the lower pouches became undone and the chargers of .303 would spill out. I'd imagine that earlier sets of ammo pouches would have been retro-fitted with retaining straps, but would need someone with better knowledge of webbing than me to confirm if that was the case

I was aware of the modification but we're all P08 sets modified as such?

They did modify earlier types to the later pattern, but the fact that examples of the unmodified earlier type still exist today (along with still hooked early 1907 pattern bayonets as an example) show that it was missed in many cases, so to see an example of the earlier type unmodified late in the war is not a real impossibility.

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I've also given him a good conduct badge and wound stripe

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If I recall correctly, you can only have Good Conduct Stripes up to the rank of Corporal (might be Lance Corporal) - the idea being you wouldn't have got to the higher rank if you didn't have a proven track record in that department...

I also cannot recall ever seeing a British Tommy wearing the Mills on his webbing strap like that - that seems more like an American WW2 thing (especially given the Mills track record for pins working loose and then going off unexpectedly at the best of times!).

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If I recall correctly, you can only have Good Conduct Stripes up to the rank of Corporal (might be Lance Corporal) - the idea being you wouldn't have got to the higher rank if you didn't have a proven track record in that department...

Andrew

Correct. I asked a similar question regarding the disappearance of good conduct badges from my great uncle's uniform in pictures taken when he was a Sergeant. Grumpy's answer was long the lines that you have given.

regards

Ian

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This is perfect! All the corrections are being worked out as they come in. I'll post the result soon.

The reason for the buttoned left side cartridge carriers was based on some photos as late as 1918 showing some Tommies with them. Thanks for clearing up the matter.

As for the Mills Bomb, its placement on this figure is picked out of a lack of knowledge on where to put it in a combat situation. What would have been the proper placement for the grenade when the soldier went over the top or when he was reachinf for one to clear a bunker etc? Pocket, small pack? I've seen the grenadier bandoleers but not every soldier was equipped with them.

Thanks again for all the help.

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As for the Mills Bomb, its placement on this figure is picked out of a lack of knowledge on where to put it in a combat situation. What would have been the proper placement for the grenade when the soldier went over the top or when he was reachinf for one to clear a bunker etc? Pocket, small pack? I've seen the grenadier bandoleers but not every soldier was equipped with them.

I don't know if they were still doing this in 1917, but in the earlier part of the war (c.1916) before an attack, every infantryman would be issued two Mills bombs, which they would carry in their lower tunic pocket/s, but with strict instructions not to throw them themselves, but to give them to a trained Bomber as required - not great if your trying to show them off on a model though!

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Thanks Andrew That was quite informative. And no it doesn't do well for trying to display a model :lol:

I know most soldiers used the improvisational Jam Tin bomb but I thought that the Mills was used on several occasions by troops during the Somme battle, clearing MG nest, bunkers, trenches etc.

Keep the observations coming!

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At present I'm deciding how I wish to make them as I don't have the tools to actually cast them. So perhaps I could carve them from wood and paint them a metallic silver.

Looks Great Alex - bear in mind that you'd need to paint them a brass colour, of course!

Peter

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Alex,

Great model ... and for 1/6th. scale a "labour of love" ... as to detail can I refer back to the "Gore Blimy" the peak is too big and looks rather stiff .... maybe a smaller soft "stitched peak" as with the later "Trench cap" would look better.

Regards,

Chris

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In re. the Gor Blimey - an infantry soldier, in 1917, wearing a gor blimey? I should think not :) very much the attire of a Corps.

Yours &c.,

Tim

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In re. the Gor Blimey - an infantry soldier, in 1917, wearing a gor blimey? I should think not :) very much the attire of a Corps.

Again, not impossible Tim - there's a lovely 1918 photo in the National Army Museum of a group of Royal Artillery soldiers - most are wearing steel helmets and leather jerkins, but two are wearing Gor'blimeys and goatskin vests - if you'd been issued one and been able to hold on to it, you'd have worn it...

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I know most soldiers used the improvisational Jam Tin bomb but I thought that the Mills was used on several occasions by troops during the Somme battle, clearing MG nest, bunkers, trenches etc.

Yes it's true, but that's more when during the heat of battle certain rules and regulation going straight out the window! ;)

Another way Mills were sometimes carried in bulk was to use the rope and canvas collapsable water buckets as a make-shift carrier.

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