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Remembered Today:

Martin Feledziak

Marcin FELEDZIAK 1897 - Infanterie Regiment 171

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Martin Feledziak

Daniel -

I am happy to see that you have updated Simon.

Martin.

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ph0ebus

Daniel -

I am happy to see that you have updated Simon.

Martin.

Thanks! He earned that promotion, so I feel it is only right to correct the record as it were.

Bob! Great to see you back!

-Daniel

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Martin Feledziak

Hello Janice.

Very nice for you to comment. I am new to this forum so everything here is wild to me. I keep putting things on here and have no idea who could be reading these events.

But I am thrilled that people are interested and add their thoughts.

I only know English so any other stuff is frustrating me.

If you could tell me what was in blue pencil on the back of the hospital photo I would be very impressed. But I know it is faded beyond understanding. I have big problems with German typeface..So even trying to understand the movements of the Pioneer battalion from Posen down to the Camp in the Argonne frustrate me.

So anything is good for me.

I will see if I can find your photo of Ernst Conrad.. But I am poor navigating around this site.

Keep in touch

Martin.

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ph0ebus

I've been trying to work on your postcard in the photo editing program I have and have had no luck in enhancing its readability. I also still lack the eye you need, and the vocabulary, to pick out any words from what you can make out. Maybe another pal with better software kung fu can coax out the wording better than I can...

-Daniel

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Martin Feledziak

Daniel.

It is yet another mission impossible. I bet it only says stuff like,

"it is cold here my arm/leg/back etc is getting better, the sourKraut is below standard and the wine is not from Bordeaux. I am not looking forward to a return to the Western Front. The Nurses here are very Nice !!!"

I am only guessing, but I am sure those are the type of things I would wish to communicate to my brother If I had been wounded and found myself in a strange wartime hospital

-- I suppose that it is written in Polish too.

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janicecasita
Hello Martin,


I am also very new to the forum so understand your difficulties and empathise with you on the navigation problems! Anthony will not be home until this evening, but he will do his best with the blue writing and I will be back in touch in a couple of days.


I really do not think that I would have been mentioning sauerkraut, I used to hate the smell as my mother was cooking it and did not particularly enjoy eating it either.


Best wishes,


Janice

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Martin Feledziak

This is a 3D image from Google Earth. It is centered on the Palace of Justice in Further Strasse, Nurnburg. It was used as as additional Hospital back-up. It could be the very place where Marcin received treatment for his wounds. Interestingly it was the place where war crimes were tried after the second war.

post-103138-0-26676300-1387273432_thumb.

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Martin Feledziak

Here is the Pogorzela 1882 entry for the Marriage of Johann Feledziak and Franziska Klepacka.

Can anyone tell me if there is any interesting information contained ? These are the best quality I can get from the web site.

So I suspect again it will be difficult.

post-103138-0-06736700-1387550068_thumb.

post-103138-0-64059000-1387550074_thumb.

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ph0ebus

I see he was born on the 5th of June, 1859. I think. Mercifully, the script here is slightly readable to me! What other details do you need?

-Daniel

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Martin Feledziak

Hi Daniel,

Thanks very much.

Where did you spot his date of birth ?

That is so close to 13.06

post-103138-0-70254200-1387552472_thumb.

Is this all in German?

Does it give her date of birth?

Does it tell us what they did for a living or where they were from ?

All I got from the database was :-

Civil registry Pogorzela entry 25 / 1882
  • Johann Feledziak (born 1859) bar100.gif 100%
    father: Thomas Fenledziak , mother: Elisabeth Binasz
  • Franziska Klepacka (born 1860)
    father: August Klepacki , mother: Nepomuzena Morawska

Thanks Martin.

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ph0ebus

Hi Daniel,

Thanks very much.

Where did you spot his date of birth ?

That is so close to 13.06

attachicon.gif13.06.jpg

Is this all in German?

Does it give her date of birth?

Does it tell us what they did for a living or where they were from ?

All I got from the database was :-

Civil registry Pogorzela entry 25 / 1882
  • Johann Feledziak (born 1859) bar100.gif 100%

    father: Thomas Fenledziak , mother: Elisabeth Binasz

  • Franziska Klepacka (born 1860)

    father: August Klepacki , mother: Nepomuzena Morawska

Thanks Martin.

The date in the VL may well be an error...my great uncle had a slightly incorrect birth date in his VL entry as well. His DOB starts on the fifth line with script that contains the word 'religion', is says "fünfte ----------- Juni" (5th of June).....etc.

I am at work at present and will try and dig more into this this evening when I have more time, assuming someone does not come along and beat me to it. I enjoy challenges like this as see them as a way to better my German comprehension skills, but I hope someone more skilled will check my work! :)

-Daniel

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Martin Feledziak

Hi Daniel.

Just that little bit of information adds weight to my theory that The Johann Killed in 1917 is my Great GrandFather. I have seen there are two main Feledziak families from those small villages surrounding Mokronos, Strzelce Wielkie and Wrotkow.

There are only 2 Johann's on the family trees.

One is certainly his Son and was killed in 1915. The only other named Johann is the father. The VL has him shown as born in June and from Szelejewo. The marriage Certificate also lists his birth as June 1859.

The next thing for me to do is research Posen Death Certificates.

Martin.

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Martin Feledziak

I just thought I would add this as it has always puzzled me.

Nurnburg.

Nurenberg.

Nurembourg.

Nurenberg.

Are all the same place - They are just variations in the way different countries spell it.

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Martin Feledziak

There has been a new development :-

http://des.genealogy.net/search/show/6476957

This report was indexed on 19th December 2013. So just a few days ago.

It is contained in a VL dated 25th July 1917.

It is a listing for Joh Feledziak ( FULL DATE OF BIRTH ! ) 13 June 1897, From Schelejewo, Koschim.

I don't understand the last word Perhaps Missing ?

So what I now know is that it is not my G Grand Father but a possible Great Uncle.

So he is the Johann at Consenvoye - and would have been almost 20 years of age.

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ph0ebus

There has been a new development :-

http://des.genealogy.net/search/show/6476957

This report was indexed on 19th December 2013. So just a few days ago.

It is contained in a VL dated 25th July 1917.

It is a listing for Joh Feledziak ( FULL DATE OF BIRTH ! ) 13 June 1897, From Schelejewo, Koschim.

I don't understand the last word Perhaps Missing ?

So what I now know is that it is not my G Grand Father but a possible Great Uncle.

So he is the Johann at Consenvoye - and would have been almost 20 years of age.

Hi Martin,

It's an abbreviation for schwer verwundet - seriously wounded.

-Daniel

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Martin Feledziak

Thanks Daniel,

That makes complete sense and is obviously the reason why they were in named graves. Both Johann's were wounded before they died so they would have received treatment first and later died. In the case of Johann 1915 he died the same day.

Consenvoye has 11,000 war dead and only a couple of hundred have named crosses, A good many are listed in mass graves.

post-103138-0-79003300-1387813644_thumb.

So this information tells me that this Johann's birth year is 1897, the same as Marcin, they would have been cousins from the same village or very nearby.

Martin

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Martin Feledziak

I am now confident that these are the parents of The above Johann. Killed in 1917

post-103138-0-77623600-1448101049_thumb.

They are married on the correct time line and are Cousins to Marcin as the parents are the same and also listed on the record.

These search databases are wonderful methods for sharing information.

The work of the indexers is very important and helps solve these mysteries

( Note to Me... The Johann Killed in 1915 must be Marcin's brother as this Johann killed in 1917 is born in the same year as Marcin 1897 and it would have been unlikely to have been promoted in rank at age of 19 years ...)

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Martin Feledziak

Greetings Forum members and Happy New year 2014.

I just thought I would post the below image. They are medals which belonged to Marcin Feledziak 1897

French liberation (WW2) - and Works medals.

post-103138-0-30925000-1388666067_thumb.

Strange collection.. Born Polish...1897 German army WW1 - French / Polish underground WW2 - Died 1968

I know the family were silent about these matters but I still want to know.

Martin

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JOVE23

Wow, I just read through this whole thread and it was a wonderful experience, I too have family from Posen and I've been trying for a long time to find out about one of the soldiers in my tree (the father of a soldier who was killed fighting for the Americans in 1918) but I can't seem to get anywhere unfortunately.

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Martin Feledziak

Hi Jove23

I only started this mission of discovery recently and I am now overloaded with information. I never imagined that I could find anything given that I only use English and everything I want to know is in an unknown language or scribbled script in the ink of centuries or mysterious typeface.

But with the help of knowledgable people on this site I have the beginnings of my history , not just the first war years, but from the late 1700's

I now see that I am lucky that my name is fairly unique which is a major aid. The truth is that records do exist and now interested people are transcribing these documents and making them searchable.

I have gained considerable information from the Poznan project too.

Let's keep looking

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JOVE23

Hi Jove23

I only started this mission of discovery recently and I am now overloaded with information. I never imagined that I could find anything given that I only use English and everything I want to know is in an unknown language or scribbled script in the ink of centuries or mysterious typeface.

But with the help of knowledgable people on this site I have the beginnings of my history , not just the first war years, but from the late 1700's

I now see that I am lucky that my name is fairly unique which is a major aid. The truth is that records do exist and now interested people are transcribing these documents and making them searchable.

I have gained considerable information from the Poznan project too.

Let's keep looking

Your thread inspired me to start my own thread with what I know about my man. Here's to hoping we both find what we're after in 2014.

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Martin Feledziak

Hi Justin.

The more I read, the more ridiculous the great war was.

I have just had a look through the yellow book pages you posted.

How many of those soldiers were from original Polish families. Even commanded by a leader who had German origins.

Many Polish people left Poland and chose America for their new lives ..Many other Polish remained in Poland, Although it was not called Poland and became Germany and that was their life.

Then in 1914 An Austrian leader was killed by a Serb. Then The Germans told the Serbs that was not on. Then the Russians told the Serbs they would look after them. The French were linked to the Russians . The Germans and Austrians together with the Hungarians then decided to rattle blades with Russia.

France supported Russia, Germany wanted to invoke the 1906 Plan which required passage through Belgium to encircle France and attack it from the west of the Verdun reigion. The King of Belgium said no as they were neutral. Then Britain had to side with Belgium and France because of a treaty.

So that was "WAR" Then Millions of people were killed.

This included many Polish/German Americans who had to support British/French/Canadian/Australian/Indian/African/Commonwealth countries to fight a European war against many Polish/Prussian/Russian ethnics who also did not wish fight. It was a true world war.

So our ancestors were these people.

I know I have condensed this turbulent history into a tiny nutshell.

But that is why our people were fighting each other in horrendous conditions.

Then they did it all again 20 years later.

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janicecasita

Hello Martin,

Many, many apologies for not having contacted you sooner.

Unfortunately, Anthony returned home with a chest infection and was in bed on amoxicillin for a week which put everything behind for Christmas and meant that we did not get to look at your postcard until the New Year. He tried his very best to interpret the writing but unfortunately it was far too faded. He tried making the background lighter and the writing darker, but to no avail.

We did wonder if the Imperial War Museum would be able to help you. They may well have the technology (such as electron microscopy) to make the writing clearer and enable reading of the postcard. We also searched the Internet and found a site called Great War Postcards which has some postcards which appear to have very faded writing (British, German and French) but we are not sure whether they have been able to be read. It does appear to be a very good site and they may be able to help. I am putting the link here: http://greatwarpostcards.blogspot.co.uk/

As Anthony was unable to read the postcard he has translated the Casualty Lists for you and will be happy to translate anything else that you would like him to look at if you contact me.

Best wishes,

Janice

Casualty Lists

Reprinting/reproduction of casualty lists is forbidden

Contents:

Prussian Casualty List nr. 1017

Saxon Casualty List nr. 470

1. When requests are made to the Central Verification Bureau of the Ministry of War, the detail of the military units belongs to the person who requests it (?)

2. Notifications/reports, which are obtained by means of lists of prisoners from enemy countries, about Germans who have been taken captive or soldiers who have died in that place, insofar as the news (from the troops) cannot be confirmed (by the troops), are to be published with the addendum “A.N.”, which means “Foreign News, not yet confirmed”.

3. The sign/mark “G.F.” means “Forensically declared dead”.

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Martin Feledziak

Hello Janice.

Do not worry. These things are from 100 years ago so there is no rush.

I just find this site fascinating and being able to view historical documents from all sides of this conflict is truly inspiring.

And this is because these are the personal stories of people who were there.

Or at least they include artefacts, such as photographs, from those individuals backed up by historical documents.

I never expected to see what was written on the back of the hospital picture and I honestly think it would be just family small talk.

The translation for the preamble on the casualty reports is very useful. I have seen (A.N) on a number of reports so that now makes good sense, Thank you.

I am always looking at the 'new content' section and then get sucked into another account then that makes me look at something else.

To be fair there is so much info on here it is possible to overload.

Thanks

Martin

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Martin Feledziak

The family name is Feledziak and it would appear that the earliest family members are from Szelejewo.

Records list Antonius and Magdalena.

There is a record which indicates that Magdalena Feledziak died in Szelejewo on 22 December 1846 aged 90.
This means that her birth year would have been around 1756.
There is a very good chance that she was the mother of Valentinus Born 1802.

However there is still mystery about the family.

Antonius and Magdalena did not have a surname in 1795 when their first listed child arrived.
3 subsequent records have shown a use of the names Dępczak/Dębczak/Dębski before it changed into Feledziak.

History is wonderful when new discoveries can be made.

Martin Feledziak

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