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Remembered Today:

Badge and furry uniform


tybaltstone
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I wonder if anyone can shed some light on this 'uniform'? Is anyone able to make a clear identification of the cap badge? (Gordon Highlanders is my guess, but would appreciate some more expert advice). And would anyone know the reason for the rather shaggy coat - does it point to a particular theatre?

The photo comes from a photo album I saw this weekend at a family get-together. I was unable to scan the picture, but was able to photograph it - so it is probably not as clear as it could be, but the best I could get I'm afraid.

His name was Andrew Stewart, born about 1897 in Glasgow, son of Samuel Stewart and Betsy Phillip. If I can get an ID on his regiment, I'm hoping to get his MIC.

Many thanks -

Garen

StewartA_wwib.jpg

StewartA_wwi.jpg

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I would agree that it looks like a Gordons badge.

The "Furry Uniform" is I think a goatskin coat - a wide variety of which were issued (both with and without sleeves) in the Winter of 1914/15 and 15/16 on the Western front. There are quite a lot of photos of them although this looks to be a spledid example!

A uniform expert will probably be along shortly to correct the above!

Chris (off to look for Gordons details)

Nat Arch gives these possibles:

Medal card of Stewart, Andrew

Corps: Gordon Highlanders

Regiment No: S/20782

Rank: Private...

Medal card of Stewart, Andrew

Corps: Gordon Highlanders

Regiment No: S/11266

Rank: Private

Medal card of Stewart, Andrew

Corps: Gordon Highlanders

Regiment No: 750/5

Rank: Private...

Medal card of Stewart, Andrew

Corps: Gordon Highlanders

Regiment No: S/19813

Rank: Private...

Medal card of Stewart, Andrew Y

Corps: Gordon Highlanders

Regiment No: 2334

Rank: Private

Medal card of Stewart, Andrew

Corps: Gordon Highlanders

Regiment No: 366

Rank: Lance Corporal...

Medal card of Stewart, Andrew C

Corps: Gordon Highlanders

Regiment No: S/20651

Rank: Private

Medal card of Stewart, Andrew

Corps: Gordon Highlanders

Regiment No: S/20264

Rank: Private

1914-1920 WO 372/19

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I think the badge might be Scottish Rifle/Cameronian. Looks like a star to me.

The coat is onbe of the emergency issue Fur coats sometimes called "Woolly Bears" or Goatskin coat, although these were manufactured in far more than just goat skin. They came in sleeved and nonsleeved versions.

First issues were in the winter of of 14/15 and became less common as the war progressed although they can be seen being worn into the winter of 17/18.

Common with the BEF but also found on other fronts.

Joe Sweeney

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On balance it looks like a Cameronian badge, as mentioned, but what's that above it? In some cases, and on certain anniversaries, individual regiments used flowers, thistles, roses etc as embellishments. Not sure if that's teh case here, but certainly looks so.

It's interesting that the 'woolly bear' coats were produced in a variety of colours from, I understand, goats. These were, again as I understand, warm to wear, but stank to high heaven. They seemed to be popular in photos like yours, sent from 'somewhere in France', I guess as a novelty item.

Interesting photo!

Cheers

Peter

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Thank you very much for the speedy replies. I think I'd have to agree with the Cameronians - it does look like it has the horn at the bottom. That has led me back to the MICs and one that looks pretty good - not only does it have the middle name of Philip (his mother's maiden name) but it has a note on the back giving the name 'B. Stewart' - his mother's name was Betsy. Also Glasgow was their home, but the address is new to me.

StewartA_wwic.jpg

It looks like he did not survive the war. Does anyone know what "acc: Browned 2-6-18" would refer to? I'm pretty new to MICs so am a bit lost all over.

Thank you again for the marvellous help - especially on the coat too. Thank you 4thGordons for going to the trouble of looking up the Gordons MICs - really appreciate it.

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The coat is one of the emergency issue Fur coats sometimes called "Woolly Bears" or Goatskin coat, although these were manufactured in far more than just goat skin. They came in sleeved and nonsleeved versions.

Joe, can you substantiate what else they were made in? I know goatskin is the most common material, but I've long believed sheepskin was another material used, and I would be most interested to see what else they were made out of!

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And got him on the CWWGC now...

Date of death 2 Jun 1918, Lieutenant KOSB, Awards MC (!!), age 21, Son of Samuel and Betsy Stewart, of 61, Camperdown Rd., Scotstoun, Glasgow.

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TO attone for my earlier misdirection on badge....

If this MIC is his then it appears he won the MC and was killed as Lieut. serving with the KOSBs.

Name: STEWART, ANDREW PHILLIP

Initials: A P

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Lieutenant

Regiment/Service: King's Own Scottish Borderers

Age: 21

Date of Death: 02/06/1918

Awards: M C

Additional information: Son of Samuel and Betsy Stewart, of 61, Camperdown Rd., Scotstoun, Glasgow.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: P. 2941.

Cemetery: GLASGOW WESTERN NECROPOLIS

EDIT...pipped to it!

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Sorry 4thGordons - but again - thank you - so helpful! I've been to the London Gazette now:

Supplement to The London Gazette 26 July 1918 p.8848

T./Lt. Andrew Phillip Stewart, attd. K.O.S.B.

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in a difficult rearguard action, when his tactical handling of men caused the enemy to suffer heavy casualties and enabled his own men to withdraw with a minimum of loss. He was wounded just as the last remnant of his command had reached safety.

Edit: Just noticed that Andrew Stewart appears on another GW Forum thread - Gallipoli brothers, Brothers killed at least 1 on Gallipoli - which shows his older brother, Henry (aka Harry) was killed at Gallipoli 14 July 1915.

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Going back to Garen's question in Post #6 - Does anyone know what "acc: Browned 2-6-18" would refer to? - my thought - especially as he appears to have been buried/commemorated in Glasgow was "accidently drowned"

According to Geoff's search engine the only other KOSB to die that day was:

Name: PRINGLE

Initials: W

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Private

Regiment/Service: King's Own Scottish Borderers

Age: 21

Date of Death: 02/06/1918

Service No: 22123

Additional information: Son of the late James and Agnes Pringle, of Blackwood, Lesmahagow.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: North of Church.

Cemetery: STICHILL (OR STICHELL) PARISH CHURCHYARD

As his body was also buried in Scotland I wondered if perhaps there had been an accident??

I've got access to SDGW thru FindMyPast - but unless I'm blind I can't see either of them on there (but you can't search to a Regiment like you can on the CD so I might have missed them both I guess) - and also can't find them on the GRO Army death registers or civil registrations in England/Wales

Might be worth checking on Scotland's People for a civil death registration that might show a cause of death

And - it's a great coat

Cheers

Sue

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Might be worth checking on Scotland's People for a civil death registration that might show a cause of death

Cheers

Sue

I have tried Scotlands people with no success... I find only two records

1 1918 STEWART ANDREW M 22 SERVICE AND WAR RETURNS /MINOR RECORDS 122/AF 0147 VIEW (5 CREDITS) ORDER

2 1918 STEWART ANDREW M 21 SERVICE AND WAR RETURNS /MINOR RECORDS 128/AF 0364 VIEW (PAID) ORDER

neither of which seem to be our man.....

these are the search terms I used:

You searched for: Surname: "Stewart"; Use Soundex: Off; Forename: "Andrew "; Sex: "Male"; Year From: 1918; Year To: 1918; Age From: 20; Age To: 22; Include Unrecorded Ages: Off; Birth Year: 1897; Birth Year Range: 1;

I must admit to being challenged when it comes to Scotlands people..... perhaps this will narrow it for others?

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Thank you for those checks. I also did a check at scotlandspeople (Stewart and Stuart) and could not find a death record that matched. I found this 8 year old message on the web:

My great uncle (Lt. Andrew Stewart) was awarded the MC during the latter stages of WW1 and died convalescing from wounds on 2nd june 1918. Could anybody help me find exact details of this award and possibly the details of the citation?

... it certainly does seem he was back in Glasgow after being wounded (MC citation). (I sent an email to the writer of the above message, but don't hold out much hope as it was posted a rather long time ago). I'd assumed he died from those wounds - but maybe 'accident drowned' does make sense! I might have to go and check The Scotsman archives next...

Interesting on the W Pringle death too - cheers for that.

Edit: no joy on The Scotsman archives.

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I think the word is "drowned" I think the writer has looped back throught the D so it looks to us more like a B.

Barbara

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Accidentaly drowned would get my vote. Never seen a ' goatskin ' with sleeves although I knew they existed. Great Photo.

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I have to agree that the word must be 'Drowned'. The only other possibility is 'Browned' and that doesn't mean anything (unless it's some form of horrible death best forgotten!). Also the 'acc:' as previously mentioned could be 'accident' which would make sense in that context.

Another point only just noticed... the handwriting on the back is the same as that for the "acc: drowned" note, perhaps indicating it was his mother who informed the War Office of her son's death while applying for the 1914 Star.

How sad he survived the war (wounded, with MC) only to drown (perhaps partly due to a wound making him unable to swim?) - if that's the truth. Frustrating I can't find a death certificate. Many thanks for the further comments.

StewartA_wwid.jpg

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Glasgow Evening Times Roll of Honour

shows no date of death, but reported on 04-06-18 and under the notes shows Mayo, could be the west coast of Ireland and drowned there all other notes show KIA. DOW, Missing etc

Wull

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Mayo, could be the west coast of Ireland

Wull

Would certainly explain why we can't find a record of death in England Wales or Scotland - don't think Irish records are easy to check online unfortunately

Cheers

Sue

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Many thanks for that, Wull - I hadn't thought of the Glasgow RoH. Well, that's pretty definitive... what was he doing in County Mayo (hospital)?

Name: Stewart, Andrew P.

Home: Glasgow

Rank: Lieutenant

Regiment: King's Own Scottish Borderers

Date of Death: --

Date in Evening Times: 04-Jun-18

Page: 3

Port: Y

Notes: Drowned in County Mayo

http://www.glasgow.gov.uk/en/Residents/Lib...ollofhonour.htm

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It was an old version of the Roll of Honour that I have and it only showed Mayo, in the notes section

Will replace it with the updated version, thanks for that.

Wull

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  • 3 years later...

He drowned in Lough Corrib while recovering from wounds in Claremorris. His age was given as 25.

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