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annabelk

Medals awarded to nurses in WW1

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annabelk

Hello

I am trying to find out about a medal or award given to a Winifred Kate Smith (nee Hubbert) in WW1. The story from her granddaughter was that she was a nurse, possibly a volunteer and served in France. The years are uncertain. Her husband was killed in navy service in 1915 and her brother was killed in action in Ypres the same year, so possibly after that. She apparently received a medal that she had to go to Buckingham Palace to receive. It was hanging on the wall in her house, but she died in 1943, and as she had remarried it has probably ended up with that side of the family.

My understanding is that these are the possiblities:

1. RRC or ARRC, in which case I would need to check the register at the National Archives, or would also be in the London Gazette or the British Journal of Nursing (can't find it in either without knowing the date, doesn't come using the search facility)

2. a Military Medal or other gallantry award (do these all show up if you look at the WW1 campaign medals index at Documents online?) As I understand it these are also in the London Gazette.

3. If she served with either the VAD or the French Red Cross in France she would have been eligible for the Victory Medal and British War Medal. Was there a Palace investiture for all of these? It looks like you had to apply for them, I am assuming that would have been in 1919 (she had migrated by then)

The only MIC listed that fits the bill (the only one without a middle name listed) is for Winifred Smith, French Red Cross nuse. The Roll is FRX/101B2, p. 61 for the Victory and British War Medals. The Theatre of War is 1a, which is Belgium/France and date of entry 10.14. Does the original roll give more information about the person that would help identify them?

Grateful for any help. I can see from previous topics that there are several people who will have all this information in their heads.

Regards

Annabel

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Jim Strawbridge

Any Australian connection? A Sister Winifred Smith, Australian Army Nursing Service, received the Royal Red Cross (2nd class) from HM The King at Buckingham Palace in November 1917.

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annabelk
Any Australian connection? A Sister Winifred Smith, Australian Army Nursing Service, received the Royal Red Cross (2nd class) from HM The King at Buckingham Palace in November 1917.

Thanks Jim

This appears to be a Winifred Jean Smith and I don't think it is the same person. The Winifred I am after did migrate to Australia sometime between 1918 and 1920, having met someone in the Australian Navy who she subsequently married. There was a story that she came to Australia on a hospital ship, so I wondered if she had joined the Australian forces at some stage. I think I have established that the Winifred you refer to is someone else, but will check the Australian Archives again. Many thanks for looking it up for me.

Regards

Annabel

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Sue Light

Annabel

On the negative side she's a Smith,

On the positive side she's Winifred and not Mary Ann :rolleyes:

The fact that she went to an Investiture at Buckingham Palace suggests either a RRC/ARRC or a Military Medal. I have a list of all women awarded the MM and there are no Smiths there, so it looks very much like the former. I'm not at home at present, but I do have a copy of the first two volumes of the RRC Register on my computer, and will have a browse through and see if I can find her when I get home. If she's there, then the service she was in, and her status within it should be recorded.

Sue

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Sue Light

I can't find a matching entry - I can see two W. Smiths - the first is Winifred J. Smith, who is Jim's AANS nurse, and the second is Miss W. M. Smith, later Mrs. Wynne.

As these RRCs were still being awarded a year or so after the Armistice, I wonder if she was by then married and using her 'new' married name? She really should be there somewhere (unless my ancient eyes are skipping over a relevant entry :blink: )

Sue

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annabelk
I can't find a matching entry - I can see two W. Smiths - the first is Winifred J. Smith, who is Jim's AANS nurse, and the second is Miss W. M. Smith, later Mrs. Wynne.

As these RRCs were still being awarded a year or so after the Armistice, I wonder if she was by then married and using her 'new' married name? She really should be there somewhere (unless my ancient eyes are skipping over a relevant entry :blink: )

Sue

Thanks Sue, the plot thickens. Winifred later became Winifred Crabb. This marriage is listed in the register of NSW BDM as 1922, though apparently the original of the marriage certificate has been altered to look like 1920, and I am wondering whether in fact she and said spouse were pretending to be married earlier than that (looking at his Australian naval records). Though I think for British purposes she would have been Smith until she was officially married, because she was getting the war pension from the first marriage (reportedly). Also, she did travel back to the UK for a short period in 1926, so I had wondered if she received her award around that time. She is also sometimes referred to as Freda. I think I have tried all these permutations in the places I have looked. Grateful for all your assistance regarding this.

(Also she is definitely neither of the Winifred Smith's you have found - I have checked Winifred Jean at the Australian Archives).

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Sue Light

Annabel

I've gone through all those Smiths again, but still nothing that vaguely resembles her. Just to explain what I'm looking at - at the beginning of each volume there is a rough index, followed by the page number where the actual entry can be found, i.e. all the 'B' or 'S' names etc., on a separate run of pages, but added in groups over many years, so there might be Smiths on every index page, or several times a page. So it's not an incredibly difficult job to pick an entry up, though they are written in a great variety of hands. I only found one 'F' Smith, and that belonged to Florence, but again, no sign of a W other than the previous two. And if she didn't receive a RRC/ARRC, it leaves the question of what was the award - I suppose it's possible that at some time she got an MBE or similar, and that could have been well after the war. For wartime service, I'm sure she would have got a RRC/ARRC by 1920.

It's still not certain whether she was a trained or untrained nurse, and perhaps the British Red Cross Society might have some records of her is she was the latter - their contact details are on this page:

British Red Cross Society Personnel Records

A bit frustrating that she doesn't appear, though I suppose that it's not certain anyway that the RRC is the right thing. She could have got the VM/BWM for service with the French, but then would not have gone to the Palace to receive them. At the back of Laurence Binyon's 'For Dauntless France' there is a 'List of British Subjects who are recorded as having gone abroad on Red Cross and kindred war-work for the French up to December 31, 1917,' but there is only one female W. Smith, and that one is a 'Miss' and not a 'Mrs'.

Sorry that there seems to be no positives here.

Sue

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annabelk

THanks for all your help thus far. I had wondered about French medals, but as you say they wouldn't have been given at Buckingham Palace. Will have another chat to the grand-daughter and see if we can make any sense of all this. I'll get back to you if any more useful info

Kind regards

Annabel

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rugeley

Hi Annabel,

The following may be of help in identifying the medal presented at Buck House.

My grandfather's cousin was Nurse Kathleen Cambridge, who worked in Belgium with Nurse Edith Cavell from 1911. Kathleen passed through the British lines on the eve of the Battle of Mons in 1914 and last saw Nurse Cavell a few days before Nurse Cavell was arrested in the following year.

Nurse Cavell was court marshalled, found guilty of aiding the escape of 200 allied soldiers through enemy lines and was shot to death by the German's firing squad.

Kathleen, known as the Angel of Mons by soldiers whose wounds she treated, and also by the British newspapers, was repatriated to England in January 1916 and joined Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service (QAIMNS). At the end of the war, because she was a civilian nurse with the Belgian Red Cross during the Battle of Mons and afterwards until repatriation, Kathleen was not entitled to campaign medals. A special case was put forward and King George V agreed and personally presented Kathleen with the 1914 Mons Star.

In 1919, still serving with QAIMNS, Kathleen was Gazetted the Royal Red Cross, 2nd Class, (ARRC).

I understand there were other civilian nurses at the front. Maybe cousin Kathleen Cambridge was not the only civilian nurse to receive a campaign medal from King George V personally at Buckingham Palace.

Pete

post-35623-1219265828.jpg

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Jim Strawbridge
At the end of the war, because she was a civilian nurse with the Belgian Red Cross during the Battle of Mons and afterwards until repatriation, Kathleen was not entitled to campaign medals. A special case was put forward and King George V agreed and personally presented Kathleen with the 1914 Mons Star.

I understand there were other civilian nurses at the front. Maybe cousin Kathleen Cambridge was not the only civilian nurse to receive a campaign medal from King George V personally at Buckingham Palace.

Pete

I hope that I am not appearing pedantic. You say that Kathleen was not entitled to campaign medals. As she was with the QAIMNS from 1916 she will have earned the British War Medal and Victory Medal. But civilians did receive the 1914 star. For instance, I have a mons star to a member of the Royal Automobile Club although it is possible that he became elligible if the RAC came under the auspices of the Joint War Committee. That I don't know.

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jacques 12
Annabel

I've gone through all those Smiths again, but still nothing that vaguely resembles her. Just to explain what I'm looking at - at the beginning of each volume there is a rough index, followed by the page number where the actual entry can be found, i.e. all the 'B' or 'S' names etc., on a separate run of pages, but added in groups over many years, so there might be Smiths on every index page, or several times a page. So it's not an incredibly difficult job to pick an entry up, though they are written in a great variety of hands. I only found one 'F' Smith, and that belonged to Florence, but again, no sign of a W other than the previous two. And if she didn't receive a RRC/ARRC, it leaves the question of what was the award - I suppose it's possible that at some time she got an MBE or similar, and that could have been well after the war. For wartime service, I'm sure she would have got a RRC/ARRC by 1920.

It's still not certain whether she was a trained or untrained nurse, and perhaps the British Red Cross Society might have some records of her is she was the latter - their contact details are on this page:

British Red Cross Society Personnel Records

A bit frustrating that she doesn't appear, though I suppose that it's not certain anyway that the RRC is the right thing. She could have got the VM/BWM for service with the French, but then would not have gone to the Palace to receive them. At the back of Laurence Binyon's 'For Dauntless France' there is a 'List of British Subjects who are recorded as having gone abroad on Red Cross and kindred war-work for the French up to December 31, 1917,' but there is only one female W. Smith, and that one is a 'Miss' and not a 'Mrs'.

Sorry that there seems to be no positives here.

Sue

hi sue

I know this is an old link but do you have any information on a nurse named Jane Bemrose a nurse who recieved the MM after WW1 ?

Many thanks

Gina

my PE is b0700930@bishopg.ac.uk

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Sue Light

Gina

I have a few details on her. She was born at Asterby, Horncastle, Lincolnshire (father William Bemrose) and trained as a nurse at Liverpool Workhouse Infirmary between 1909 and 1912. She was working at the St. John Ambulance Brigade Hospital in Etaples when it was bombed on the night of 31st May 1918, and it was for her actions that night that she received the Military Medal. The citation reads:

For gallantry and devotion to duty during an enemy air raid. She showed disregard of danger, and continued to attend the wounded in her charge during the heavy bombardment

I have a small photo of her in uniform, which you may have seen, but can send it if not.

Sue

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royalredcross

The MiC card for W. Smith is probably the one you are after as the date of entry into theatre is 1914. She is listed in Binyon's book also as Miss W. Smith. The 1914 and 1914-15 Stars were given only for nursing British wounded, so she will have had only the British War and Victory Medals impressed on the rim with her name and initial only.

The reference you give from the card indicates service at the Hopital de l'Alliance at Dieppe.

Norman

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rossjthomas@bigpond.com

Greetings Sue,

Need your advice. Are you aware of a British Great War Red Cross badge or brooch that depicted the image of Edith Cavell? Still working on Chomley for my proposed film, Dear Miss Chomley. Kindest regards, Ross Thomas rossjthomas@bigpond.com

Gina

I have a few details on her. She was born at Asterby, Horncastle, Lincolnshire (father William Bemrose) and trained as a nurse at Liverpool Workhouse Infirmary between 1909 and 1912. She was working at the St. John Ambulance Brigade Hospital in Etaples when it was bombed on the night of 31st May 1918, and it was for her actions that night that she received the Military Medal. The citation reads:

For gallantry and devotion to duty during an enemy air raid. She showed disregard of danger, and continued to attend the wounded in her charge during the heavy bombardment

I have a small photo of her in uniform, which you may have seen, but can send it if not.

Sue

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Sue Light

Ross

Medals and badges are not really something I know much about, but I'm not aware of any BRCS badge as you describe. The BRCS Voluntary Services Medal, awarded for long service, has a stylised image of Florence Nightingale on it, and there may well have been some commemoratives issued around that time. The BRCS Archives are probably the best people to ask.

Sue

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yellow

Greetings Sue,

Need your advice. Are you aware of a British Great War Red Cross badge or brooch that depicted the image of Edith Cavell? Still working on Chomley for my proposed film, Dear Miss Chomley. Kindest regards, Ross Thomas rossjthomas@bigpond.com

All Red Cross medals are listed on the Red Cross Web site.

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/Museum-and-archives/Collections/Medals-and-badges

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Guest Margareta

Nurse Jane Bemrose had a brother who also served in WW1 namely Harold Bemrose. I have a large photo of a WW1 soldier, not named but has the words "Out of the trenches and back to Blighty - Bemrose. Perhaps this is Harold. Does anyone have a photo of Harold that I could compare with to prove or otherwise.

Margaret Armstrong - New Zealand. Email: margaret@megadyne.co.nz

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Guest Crabb

Hi Annabel,

I have only read your query in regard to Winifred Kate Smith (née Hubbert). I am her granddaughter from her second marriage to Charles Francis John Crabb, which bore a son George Frederick Crabb, living in

Australia. Happy to give you any information you require. I am sorry that I didn't see this back in 2008.

Regards Diane

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James A Pratt III

The book Titanic Survivor" by Violet Jessup who was a VAD in WW I and also survived the sinking of the HMHS Britannic has a copy of her 'Authority to wear War Medals for the Merchant marine' they are:

British War medal ribbon

Mercantile Marine Medal ribbon

British War Medal (and Clasp)

Mercantile Marine Medal

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James A Pratt III

I have some Russian nurses who won medals:

Ryhmma M Ivanova won the Order of St George 4th Class Poustomously while working at an aid station of the 105th Infantry Regiment she rallied the 10th company of this unit during a German attack and was fatally wounded while doing so.

Helen Ivansko decorated after charging behind Russian Cavalry and aiding the wounded. See the book "The End of Chivalry

HIH Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrona (Tsar Nicholas IIs younger sister)did work as a nurse during WW I and for awhile was attached to the 12th Arhyrska Hussars. The unit she was honorary Colonel of. She was decorated

HIH Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna who also worked as a nurse during WW I and received the St George Medal. He brother Dmitri was involved in the murder of Rasputin.

I hope this is of some interest

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James A Pratt III

I have a Rumanian nurse Ecaterina Teodorina who I believe was decorated for rallying the troops in 1916. She was made a LT and a Platoon Leader and was KIA 31 September 1917

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Jim Strawbridge

I believe that she was awarded the Roumanian Miltary Virtue Cross. I have a date of death as 20th August 1917. That is, if we are talking about the same woman.

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lyn Mattys

Can you help?  My ggranddaughter is desiring information about her aunt for a project. She served in France during World War 1and was decorated by the King WW1

It was reported she was made either an assistant matron at Queen Alexandria hospital, and also wan another person who received a medal from the  King at Buckingham Palace.  Her maiden surname was Loveland  She married a medic close to the end of the war, was aged 39 years old at time. Her husband  was younger when they married in England.  I can't find any further information, and have lost the notes I made on her history.

I became aware of her story when I saw a memory of her posted on a family history section on my computer, but I have dozens of Loveland's, and I can't remember her first name.

The photo, printed in the London Gazette showed her with a small group of people outside Buckingham palace posing for a photo about 1916. I understand she was a trained nurse and the medal had some kind of attachment with it..

 

I really wish I had paid more attention  to this episode which was not in my lifetime, but it is of importance to my great grand daughter, and I feel caught up in her excitement and pride.

Thank you for anything you can send me about Nurse Loveland.  I am proud particularly of the nurses in that generation.  

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DavidOwen

Welcome to the Forum

 

What was the lady's first name?

There are no records of a military nurse with that surname at the National Archives but there are a number of Lovelands listed in the records of the British Red Cross here might she be one of these?

 

Good luck with your search!

 

David

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DavidOwen

Another approach is to check for Medal Index Cards

 

I have found one for M J Loveland https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D6272171 (look at it through the watermark by making it full page then using the magnifier) somehow I am struggling to find it on Ancestry's free site at the moment....

 

Regrettably the MIC doesn't seem to show any medals awarded.

 

You might want to consult this excellent site for more background info http://www.scarletfinders.co.uk/

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