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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

6327 Wilbraham Kirkham MM. KSLI


high wood
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I picked up a Great War paybook at the carboot sale this morning. It was issued to Pte 6327 Wilbraham Kirkham of the 3rd Battalion, King's Shropshire Light Infantry on 12th December 1918. The Soldiers' Pay Book (Army Book 64) is clearly a replacement as Wilbraham enlisted on 23rd March 1913 aged 19. Interestingly, written on the back cover of the book in pencil appears to be his Second World War service number and unit: 2063201 L/Cpl W Kirkham. MM. 324 Company RE AA TA, Stonecot Hill, Sutton.

It appears that he was awarded the Military Medal during the Great War. Can somebody please check to see if his Medal Index cards are on Ancestry? It would be much appreciated.

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Here

Mick

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I think that me and Doug must be having a very quiet day!

Mick

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Greetings to all at Hopper's Crossing. is the animal research centre still there?

Mick

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Gentlemen,

many thanks to you both for taking the time to download this for me. It is much appreciated. This was obviously a house clearance lot as with the paybook were a lot of silk postcards and handkerchiefs, one can only wonder what happened to the medals.

Thanks again,

Simon.

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Did you get find anything else Simon?

mick

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Greetings to all at Hopper's Crossing. is the animal research centre still there?

Mick

Hi Mick,

If you mean the Werribee Animal Clinic and hospital it sure is.

Doug

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QUOTE (auchonvillerssomme @ May 25 2008, 01:05 PM)

Did you get find anything else Simon?

mick

yes, indeed I did. I tend to get lucky at my local carboot sale as a lot of the house clearance boys put things to one side for me. This morning I also bought a copy of the, "standing orders of the Brigade of Guards", which is stamped inside, "1st Battn, Coldstream Guards, 28th March 1936 Orderly room, copy no 2" and has the names R.S.M. Brittain and J Lillers WO1 written in ink. I get a lot of my photographs and documents from the house clearance boys, they used to throw a lot of them away as they couldn't sell them. I have mounted an ongoing campaign to save photographs and documents and the dealers are quite happy to sell the items relatively cheaply knowing that they will be researched and appreciated.

Simon.

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RSM Brittain, Guards legend.

Mick

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Ronald Brittain MBE (September 12, 1899- January 9, 1981) was well known during his lifetime as an archetypal Regimental Sergeant Major (R.S.M.) and for having possibly the loudest voice in the British Army. He was often featured in World War II training films and was reported on widely in the newspapers of the day. On retirement from the army, R.S.M. Brittain's notoriety enabled him to enjoy a career in advertising, voice over work and film acting, usually playing a Sergeant Major.

He was born in Aigburth Vale, Liverpool, the son of a gardener and worked in a local butcher's shop from leaving school until 1917, when he enlisted first in the King's (Liverpool) Regiment and then transferred into the South Wales Borderers, where his imposing height of six feet three inches soon saw him promoted. He eventually transferred to the Coldstream Guards. Attached to the training staff at the Royal Military Academy, Sandhurst, he was well known for his parade ground bellow, which could reduce the gentleman cadets - many of them foreign princes and titled sons of the aristocracy - to trembling wrecks. Known to the cadets as "The Voice", he was credited as the originator of that phrase so beloved of sergeant majors: "You 'orrible little man!" He eventually became Regimental Sergeant Major of the Guards Depot, the most senior non-commissioned appointment in the British Army, and later of Mons Officer Cadet School in Aldershot, where it was estimated that around 40,000 officer cadets passed through his tender care. Brittain retired from the army in 1954 and, after a spell as a salesman for an outsize clothing outfitters, he acted in films and plays and lent his legendary voice to a number of radio and television advertisements. Still an imposing figure in old age, Brittain was a member of the Society of Toastmasters and was a popular presence at public functions.

Mick

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Mick,

superb, what a fascinating character he was. I shall treasure the book even more now. Many thanks,

Simon.

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I think you will probably find some contributors to the forum who knew him, certainly many would of heard of him, my dad would tell stories about him.

mick

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  • 4 years later...

It's a long time since this item was posted. However, I believe this refers to my grandfather and I would like to know more about the items you have.

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  • 1 month later...

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