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Remembered Today:

Stretcher Bearers Auxilliery Strap


findabetterole
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Hello,

Both of the British Naval stretcher bearers are making use of an auxilliery carrying strap (ringed in red). Does anyone have a pic of the ends which are slipped over the stretchers carrying handles?

That portion of the strap is in view for the rear stretcher bear, but only partially.

Is this a buckle, or are the two ends of the strap stitched together to for the carrying loop?

Any help would be most appreciated!

Seph :D

post-18081-1210981607.jpg

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The one I have is from the P'37 eqpt (dated MEC 1944) but surely they never changed that much being a simple yolk affair? The ends of the strap turn back on itself (after a brass buckle has been placed on the leg) the reverse turn forming the loop then pushed through the buckle from the top & stitched for approx 2" backwards being on the inside.. The buckle is the same I think on the ones used for the short stubs on the Large pack/small back to carry on the adjustable arm straps.

Hello,

Both of the British Naval stretcher bearers are making use of an auxilliery carrying strap (ringed in red). Does anyone have a pic of the ends which are slipped over the stretchers carrying handles?

That portion of the strap is in view for the rear stretcher bear, but only partially.

Is this a buckle, or are the two ends of the strap stitched together to for the carrying loop?

Any help would be most appreciated!

Seph :D

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Thanks Neil.. appreciated.

A picture paints a thousand words as they say, so, could you possibly post a pic or two?

Seph

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Hard enough to follow these answers never mind post a pic:-)) I take it the pic posted is WW1 or....the one iIhave although simple is a bit more complicated than yours? There are two buckles and a cross over at the yolk for the arms to go into. But as I wrote it is dated 1944 so maybe modified for better use from the previous marks? also the buckle isn't like the one depicted which is a quick release as MOST of the P'37 webbing buckles?

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Hi Neil

Nope mine is an unissued WW2 version as well.

There are two types though that I have come across, one as per photo which is just a plain strap fixed loop at one end, adjustable at the other, which I believe matches most seen in WW1 photos. But there is also a later WW2 type with as you say a sewn in yoke, the ends of which I think are similar, but I cannot find my example to check.

I am almost certain my example has standard brass chape fittings.

Gareth

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Gareth... once again, you have come up trumps.. thank you!

Could you tell me what the full length of the item in the pic is, from tip of the sewn loop (as shown), to the tip of the other end of the strap?

Seph

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Hi Seph

The maximum extension on the example shown is 55", the sewn loop is 8" and because of the need to trap the chape buckle the other end has 2" of doubled webbing.

I am afraid I refuse to measure it in centipedes!!

Gareth

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Real measurements are good enough for me Gareth :D

All I need to now is find the correct width and length of webbing!

Seph

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The webbing is standard 2" wide the chape buckle the same as the 08, and I have also recently seen the straps being sold surplus by a USA dealer, but can't refind him on the web, If I do I'll PM you.

Gareth

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Thanks Gareth.. apreciated.

Seph

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I don't think the 2-inch buckle in post No. 4 was used for stretcher slings during the Great War.

The Mark III stretcher slings were made of webbing and introduced in the 1890s. They were converted by having this grip piece sewn on, making them Mark IV.

They were not modified again until 1923. This was when the transverse strap was removed from the sling and sewn onto the canvas of the stretchers so that they could buckle the poles together when not in use.

total length of the sling was 6 ft.

Chris Henschke

post-671-1211078015.jpg

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Grip piece

post-671-1211113025.jpg

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Just to say the buckles on the example I have here are only x3 bar viz a central part and the two outers forming the buckle. I remarked on the pic sent in post 4 as well, the buckle being the quick release type. The waist belt on the P'37 had the same smalller buckles on the back but not the opening....obviously this was to ensure it wasn't possible to detach easily being the achor point? I would therefore say the same would appl y to the srtetcher webbing inso much as the patient would be in danger if it gave way:-)))

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Its all becoming much clearer now...

Chris, from reading my copy of: Royal Army Medical Corps Training, WO:1911 (reprinted 1914), the illustrations that you have posted make sence of the illustrations from the above publication: pages-172 & 180. Called a 'Stretcher Sling', the item is described in various used ways for horse-drawn and train transportation of wounded. Nothing is mentioned of individual use by the stretcher bearer in the field.

Could this item have been unofficially adapted by the individual to make the task easier, and thus we, in modern times, read of and take for granted that the item was issued officially?

Gareth, I do not now doubt the authenticity of your item, for as we all know, all maner of similar items have appeared from the Great War in reference to one particular task or another. The stretcher bearers utility sling being no exeption. Could the buckle system used for your example have been a case of using what was to hand at the time, due in part to the slim availability of the official item (as I have illustrated below)?

Seph

post-18081-1211138086.jpg

post-18081-1211138102.jpg

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'Could this item have been unofficially adapted by the individual to make the task easier, and thus we, in modern times, read of and take for granted that the item was issued officially?'

They were officially introduced through List of Changes. The Mark II slings were officially issued in the 1870's.

Chris Henschke

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Hi Seph

My sling is WW2, quite clearly the stretcher sling was simplified by the time of the later conflict, but it did appear to match the WW1 photographs as best as I could tell.

Any Battalion shoemaker, or leather worker could make the type quite easily. If they access to a standard Singer machine in about 6 minutes.

Gareth

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This is the Great War pattern of stretcher sling.

Regards,

W.

post-6903-1211220353.jpg

post-6903-1211220446.jpg

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This is the Great War pattern of stretcher sling.

Regards,

W.

'W'... your item matches exactly the illustration in the RAMC publication I mention. Do you know if this stretcher sling if reproduced today?

Seph

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I very much doubt it. There were a lot of these around 20+ years ago, all with various WW1 dates and all perfectly genuine. I think I paid £15 for this one about 10 years ago. If you are prepared to be patient, one should in theory turn up eventually.

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  • 5 years later...
Guest Toc Charlie.

Just trying to revive this ancient thread;

Does anybody make reproductions of these slings yet? I am in sore need of a pair.

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Don't forget the emergency option of a pair of 9' long puttee's!

David

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Hi

there is also a set of leather straps also for the stretcher although I can't find the reference at the moment

regards

Dave

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