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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Odd Newf'd Reg. Badge?


keith119
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Tis a collar badge Keith and would have been worn on the right collar facing the opening of the tunic. Many collar badges are right and left facing,

cheers, Jon

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Tis a collar badge Keith and would have been worn on the right collar facing the opening of the tunic. Many collar badges are right and left facing,

cheers, Jon

Oh. That clears that up.

Do you know if there is any difference in the cap badge and collar badge facing to the left?

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Collar badges are always worn in pairs and in many cases were smaller versions of the cap badge, so pairs such as the Newfoundlanders collar badges would be one right and one left facing. As far as I'm aware the Newfoundlanders always wore the Caribou facing to the left (if yer looking at it) on the cap badge. Hope it helps,

cheers, Jon

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I haven't seen to many Collar Dogs for the NFLD Rgt. in person, but despite what the seller has written, this one has some major damage. The Caribou is missing the back section of its rack, which should extend almost straight out behind the ear ending halfway over the scroll. The cap and collar badges for the NFLD Rgt., from what I can tell, were roughly the same size.

The collar badge for the regiment during the Great War was worn, for the most part with both caribou facing left. All the photos I have looked at of the regiment in 1914-1915 and some for later years show the badges, when worn, both facing left. There may have been a change during the war to the badge, as the shoulder titles changed from "1stNFLD" to just "NFLD" once 2nd Battalion was established, but I'm not aware of it.

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I like the "Just about all these guys were killed in WW1" line. No hyperbole there, then.

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See Digger History for a pair of collars to the Royals.

http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-badges/canada04.htm

The Cap and Collar badge set shown on Digger History are post Second World War. The Rgt. was stood down in 1919 and not reformed as an infantry regiment until the late 1940's when it was reformed as a militia unit and allowed to keep their battle honours and royal title from the Great War. These badges come from that reformation as during the Second World War the 166th and 59th both wore badges of the royal artillery, the primary distinction as being from Newfoundland was the khaki cloth shoulder title with Newfoundland embroidered in red.

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I used to correspond with newfoundland collector and he tells me that these badges are overvalued particulary by the people placing bids on eBay. Sadly there is no definitive book on badges to the Newfoundland units.

The 1949 collars are usually solid backed so I have been told by this gentleman and are often sold as circa WW1. The badge for sale here may be an officers collar its the only plausable explanation I give as to why it is facing in the wrong direction although the quality does not suggest this, a possible rare late war collar that could possibly explain the price?

Ive always had a soft spot for this British regiment.

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It could be a rare late war officers badge, as I say I have seen very few NFLD collar badges, but photos of officers up to at least late 1915 early 1916 show officers wearing the caribou both pointing left. I agree that the quality may preclude it from being an officers as well

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Chris, I am also not dismissing the possibility this is a sweet hearts brooch. There were similar die struck badge sweet hearts made for other British units that can often be mistaken for collar badges.

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  • 2 months later...

My Grandfather was in The Newfoundland Regiment, picked this badge up off of ebay last week. Thankfully it did'nt command the price of the original poster's ebay link.

I did read these were made up until 1950, is there anyway to determine the age of this example?

NfldRegBadgesml.jpg

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