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Remembered Today:

HAG 12 & 3


Liz M
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Hi

I am trying to piece together the history of an ancestor of mine, James Edward Baskott. His Army form B103 states that although he enlisted on the 26.8.1914 he did not go to France until 31.5.1915. The 'remarks' column states 'Nom Roll of 12 (new) HB RGA'. Does this make sense to anyone, I'm sure it will - but I'm very ignorant of these things......

James is then transferred to the 3HAG for 'wireless instruction', this was 'in the field' he then appears to go back to the 12 Hy bty,

Any help with strange terms much appreciated.

Thanks

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Liz

'Nom Roll of 12 (new) HB RGA' = Nominal Roll of 12 (new) Heavy Battery Royal Garrison Artillery.

3HAG = 3 Heavy Artillery Group (a Royal Garrison Artillery formation).

12 Hy Bty is of course 12 Heavy Battery again.

Hope that helps (even a little bit).

Phil

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I'm by no means an expert in the Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA), but 12 HB simply means 12th Heavy Battery.

If you look at the parent site (Long Long Trail (link at top left)), you'll find a link to the formations of the Army, and it shows 12 HB as being part of 99 Brigade, RGA, which was in turn part of the 2nd Army.

I'm sure someone with RGA expertise on here will be able to tell you more!

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Thank you - things are a bit clearer :huh:

I don't understand the 'nominal roll' bit..... I am blonde......

and does it mean the 12 Heavy Group are 'new' as in part of the 'new army'. The new army would make sense because James enlisted in August 1914 - for three years, or are they just new guns? Doh - many apologies to those whose eyebrows are raised!

Liz

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A nominal roll is simply a list of who is serving with a particular unit. A bit like the register at school. It means that he is serving with them as his permanent unit, even though he may be seconded elsewhere for periods (such as on his course of wireless instruction).

Not sure about the "new" bit, I must admit. I think it means a newly-formed unit, perhaps, or it might indicate that the unit has been reformed with the expansion of the army at the start of the war. You'll have to ask someone with RGA expertise to answer that one.

Is there any chance you could attach a copy of the relevant part of the form? It might make things a bit clearer?

Bob

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Heavy batteries were moved from one Heavy Artillery Group/Heavy Brigade (same thing but called differently at varying stages in the war) to another as operational circumstances required - some stayed with the same HAG/Hy Bde for quite a time, others were transferred frequently.

You can be lucky and find the Battery War Diary at the National Archives (or Firepower, Woolwich) but as time went on these became rarer, but you can trace battery details by searching the HAG/Hy Bde War Diaries which are of varying detail and are more likely to be available. You need to apply lateral thinking when searching for these in the online Catalogue.

'New' Battery means one formed using newly volunteered Kitcheners Men - with pre-war regulars beefing up the officers and NCOs. After the war commenced many new batteries were formed but they were initially formed using all pre-war regulars and these were not called 'New' (!)

In the Heavy world of artillery I believe there were only six pre-war Heavy Batteries. I am not sure when the first 'New' battery was formed and there may be more to this designation.

Alan

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