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Remembered Today:

What did he die of?


eviltaxman
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Today I've received a copy of a death cert to a chap I'm researching and although he died of heart disease, I'm having a slight problem with the other word. Can anyone make out the other word?

I thought it was "synapse", but it looks more like "syneope" or "synaspe" (and therefore a spelling error).

Les

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May be a spelling mistake as you say, synapse has something to do with cholesterol levels. Ralph.

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Syncope is a sudden loss of consciousness due to an interuption in the blood supply to the brain. So a possible answer.

Synapse is the junction between two neurons (nerves). An unlikely answer.

Garth

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Thanks guys. I also thought synapse was wrong.... but then again I ain't a doctor (I don't have the patience :P )

It looks like the main candidate is Syncope. The link Neil supplied gives the indication that it's a general ailment given to many illness;

Typical triggers for vasovagal syncope include:

prolonged standing or upright sitting

stress

any painful or unpleasant stimuli, such as

giving a blood donation or watching someone give one

watching someone experience pain

watching/experiencing medical procedures

hyperthermia, a prolonged exposure to heat

sudden onset of extreme emotions

hunger

nausea or vomiting

dehydration

urination ('micturition syncope') or defecation ('defecation syncope')

swallowing ('swallowing syncope')

coughing ('cough syncope')

abdominal straining or 'bearing down' (as in defecation)

random onsets due to nerve malfunctions

Pressing upon certain places on the throat, sinuses, and eyes.

High altitude

People with vasovagal syncope typically have recurrent episodes, usually when exposed to a specific trigger. The initial episode often occurs when the person is a teenager, then recurs in clusters throughout his or her life. Prior to losing consciousness, the individual frequently experiences a prodrome of symptoms such as lightheadedness, nausea, sweating, ringing in the ears, and visual disturbances. These last for at least a few seconds before consciousness is lost, which typically happens when the person is sitting up or standing. When they pass out, they fall down; and when in this position, effective blood flow to the brain is immediately restored, allowing the person to wake up.

So, at a guess, I'd have to say that my chap, although suffering from heart disease (he was only 37 years old!!), suffered a "syncope" which ended his life "suddenly" (as the family have advised).

Les

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Glad i could help Les.

I've come across a few of these, although i've found some weird and wonderful causes of death.

Neil

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I'm just glad to have an actual cause of death. As he was in a "Service Btn" at the time, and therefore here in Blighty, you've got a much better chance of knowing the cause. My Gt Gt Grandfather (Henry Blatchford) was simply listed as "killed in action". I suppose you can't determine a cause if you don't have the body!

Thanks again,

Les

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Seen "syncope" as cause of death on recent medical papers. Usually a contributary cause of death and usually associated with a terminal illness.

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So, at a guess, I'd have to say that my chap, although suffering from heart disease (he was only 37 years old!!), suffered a "syncope" which ended his life "suddenly" (as the family have advised).

Could his heart disease have been caused or contributed to by rheumatic fever? It seems to have been a common childhood illness, and could weaken the heart.

(I saw a few references to this on the board when I did a search on rheumatic fever, it was one of the illnesses that contributed to the death of one of my chaps, see the link in my signature.)

Apologies if I've missed a fact which rules this out completely, I just thought it would be a possible explanation for him having heart disease at 37.

Cheers,

Carole.

P.S. I can't believe this is my 100th post, I've only been on the board for 20 days! :D

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You were warned that it was addictive, Carole. :D

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Thanks Carol. RF - hadn't thought of that. It is a strong posibility as you mention.

Congrats on your 100th ;)

Les

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Apologies for shifting the subject of the post slightly to the left but would like to suggest that "he was . . . therefore here in Blighty" might put you on a false trail.

I believe that a "Service Battalion" battalion at the time simply denoted that he was serving in a battalion that was raised as part of Kitchener's New Army or later specifically for active service. Many many SB's were in active front-line service overseas.

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3rd Btn Cheshires were a Reserve Btn based (at the time) at Hereford Barracks. Below is taken from TLLT....

3rd (Reserve) Battalion:

August 1914 : in Chester. Remained in UK throughout the war, providing drafts for other battalions. Regimental depot remained at Chester while battalion moved to war station at Birkenhaed, to play part in Mersey Defences. Moved in 1917 to Newscastle, in May 1918 to Seaton Carew and in September 1918 to West Hartlepool, as part of Tees Garrison.

Les

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Could his heart disease have been caused or contributed to by rheumatic fever? It seems to have been a common childhood illness, and could weaken the heart.

(I saw a few references to this on the board when I did a search on rheumatic fever, it was one of the illnesses that contributed to the death of one of my chaps, see the link in my signature.)

Apologies if I've missed a fact which rules this out completely, I just thought it would be a possible explanation for him having heart disease at 37.

Cheers,

Carole.

P.S. I can't believe this is my 100th post, I've only been on the board for 20 days! :D

Carole, prior to the antibiotic era, Reheumatic Fever was one of the most common causes of heart disease, especially in young people. Heart Disease leading to death in a 37 year old would very likely have been due to Rheumatic Fever, but there is no way to really tell from that certificate. Some sort of congenital heart disease is another possibility, but age 37 would tend to make that less likely. Syncope has been well-explained, but it is normally a term to describe a short period of "passing out", which tends to clear up as soon as the patient is on the ground. While conceivable, in 30+ years of practicing medicine, I have never seen it as a cause of death on a death certificate. Maybe the term is used a bit differently in the UK than in the US. Doc2

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As he was in a "Service Btn" at the time, and therefore here in Blighty, you've . . .

Sorry, eviltaxman, I was responding to your apparent supposition as quoted above. At the time, I didn't see that his Reserve Bn. was permanently stationed in UK. Regards, Antony

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Antony,

No worries. I've read and re-read threads before now and totally missed the point. Time I needed new glasses :lol:

Les

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Again, slightly off point, if he was in the 3rd Battalion this was in fact a regular battalion, the depot battalion (and therefore reinforcing battalion) for the other two regular battalions, one in Ireland and one in India at the outbreak of the war. As a matter of interest, when did he die?

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Hi Les

If you have ancestry subscription, keyword Syncope under the Royal Naval Division Casualties, there are 21 hits.

Neil

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You're right Les, from here on i'll be rather wary of seeing Syncope as cause of death.

Neil

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