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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

"Bugler - Londonderry 1914"


KMF
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Hello,

I was hoping that someone might be able to help me with this photo.

I believe that this is a photo of one of my father's uncles, who was apparently known as a bugler and who also served in WW2.

One uncle served with Inniskillen D Guards, but it is believed another saw service with Innis. Fusiliers. There were 5 brothers in all, most of whom served in both wars in some capacity or other.

Can anyone confirm that this is the Innisk. Fus.'s cap badge? The photo was dated "Londonderry 1914" and annotated with "Bugler" before the family surname.

Also does anyone have any thoughts on whether these 2 guys would have seen service abroad? They seem very young.

Thanks in advance for all comments,

Diane

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Looks like the Royal Inniskillen Fusiliers badge on those caps worn at a jaunty angle that an NCO wouldn't have approved of.

Look very young as you say, boy soldiers, but neither of them appears to be wearing a bugler's badge.

Age for overseas service was 19 years later lowered to 18 years but as we know, many went on service under age.

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I'd agree with Squirrel on that - lovely shot for the folks back home. But don't they look young!

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Diane,

What are the boys names?

They could have been pre-war boys soldiers. I don't think they are volunteers as they are wearing the mills pattern canvas belt.

If the photo was taken in Londonderry in 1914 it would only be the regulars wearing these.

The Londonderry volunteer battalion of the Inniskillings, the 10th, wore the early pattern leather equipment for the first few months of training.

At the start of the war the 1st Btn was in India and the second Btn at Dover, its base.

So they may have been with the Garrison Btn at Ebrington Barracks Londonderry.

Not sure when the 3rd reserve Btn was formed, and they may have been based at Enniskillen.

The boys could have been on a trip to Londonderry from Enniskillen and just decided to have their pictures done.

Not the youngest looking 'skin' by a long way.

I have a photo of 'B' company 10th Inniskillings and one of the lads is holding a rifle bigger than he is.

Rob.

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Hello again,

I need to apologise for not getting back sooner, but I was off-line for most of yesterday.

This is all very reassuring to me, in that I was not 100% certain about the few facts that I have. There was some doubt surrounding his obvious youth and this has also been put to bed.

Thankyou to all for your comments. I didn't know about the bugler badge, great that this was pointed out. I suspect he could have got that later. In any case, it does not rule out this particular family story, and the rest has been spot on so far. The fact that Bugler was written on the back is good enough reason - for me anyway - for it to be a positive identification of this particular great uncle of mine.

I like the reference to the angle of the caps, which I too noticed and quietly 'tutted' at. Fits in well with this man's character, I suspect he was setting out his stall early ... bet it made his mother smile though.

This photo was stored in the cliched shoe box at a relative's house for a long time and its existence only came to light recently. I am pleased to finally put a name to the face for my cousin.

Many, many thanks for the help,

Diane

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Looks like the Royal Inniskillen Fusiliers badge on those caps worn at a jaunty angle that an NCO wouldn't have approved of.

Look very young as you say, boy soldiers, but neither of them appears to be wearing a bugler's badge.

Age for overseas service was 19 years later lowered to 18 years but as we know, many went on service under age.

Have a reprimand, sir!

Write out 100 times

"There were no buglers per se appointed in line infantry units. A soldier appointed [and badged] as a DRUMMER was required to be proficient on the drum, bugle and flute [some say fife]. Buglers were appointed in Light Infantry and Rifles".

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Mea culper, mea culper, mea maxima culper.

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