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Remembered Today:

Our Somme tour 2008


Sir Cliff
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Me and my Shadows did our annual tour to the Somme on 20, 21 and 22 April.

Our subjects were this time The battle of Dernancourt, The crash site of Manfred von Richthofen

and the Australian involvements near Villers-Bretonneux.

I made some 300 photo' s and I like to share the most interesting ones.

Our first stop was Faubourg d' Amiens cemetery in Arras.

A very impressive cemetery

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The pillar to commemorate the Royal Flying Corps.

Also at Faubourg d' Amiens cemetery

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Lovely photographs. Thank you and keep them coming. Lots of people who cannot visit the area really value such contributions.

Jim

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Following photo's deal with the battle of Dernancourt fought by the Australians

on 5th April 1918.

To read about the battle you can vieuw the Official History of Australia.

A link can be found in the Classic threads, Official Histories, Post 54.

In the Official History link to Vol. 5 Chapter 12

This photo vieuws the tunnel under the railway (the history mentions railway bridge)

where heavy fighting took place

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Good sharp photographs, well done.

They were also very interesting, I haven't had a good look at that area yet, will do so on my next visit.

Regards

Nige

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Great pictures, hope to visit this area myself this year.

cheers,

John.

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Fantastic photos lads! Any shots just around the bend in the railway a bit? Thats where Sgt McDougall of the 47th Bn performed his action which earned him the VC.

Cheers,

Aaron

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Very risky taking a picture on a working railway line i hope you had a look out . :D

Dan

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Great photos, will have to start digging my old ones out. Peter

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The land over which the Australians had to retire from the Germans.

On the left Dernancourt communal cemetery extension.

In the background the Quarry

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Thanks for the great photos and commentary, Sir Cliff. The Rememberence to the Animals has just been put on my list for our next visit!

Cheers

Kim

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The Rememberence to the Animals has just been put on my list for our next visit!

Kim - I knew you were going to say that - the list keeps growing - you know we're going to have to go for a lot longer next time..............

I love the French headstones - I'm sure the only ones we saw were simple crosses.

Aaron - I just read your article on Sgt McDougall this morning!

Sir Cliff - thanks for sharing.

Cheers, Frev

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The Quarry between the railway and the Amiens - Albert road.

Artillery was placed inside to stem the German advance.

But no luck

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Artillery was placed inside to stem the German advance.

But no luck

Not artillery, but two batteries of Vickers from the 4th Machine Gun Battalion. The quarry was the support line in case the railway siding fell to the Germans and stop them from 'rolling up' the Australian positions further up the hill from behind. The area was so exposed any movement during the day drew enemy fire, and observation was a problem because the front line was covered in a thick morning mist. Although the gunners had been warned that an attack was imminent, the Germans punched through through the fog to find the the machine-guns dismantled and unmounded. The quarry was quickly surrounded and its garrison overwhelmed.

I'm glad you guys took a photo of the quarry. What happened to the machine-gunners at Dernancourt was a great mystery at the time. It was thought that the gunners had fought to the death, but it wasn't until two of them managed to knick-off through the German lines that the full story became known.

Cheers,

Aaron

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Just a time out for posting more photo´ s.

This gives me the opportunity to react to some postings.

Thanks everyone who gave me kind words.

Aaron - I have no photo around the corner of the railway where the VC was won.

I thought that mortars were placed in the quarry but I accept your correction.

Not surprisingly most reactions come from down under.

Last year we were at Bullecourt and for those interested, photo´ s can be found

in the topic 90th Anniversary. Australians at Bullecourt - was there a celebration.

Some ask for more photo´ s and I can assure you, more will come.

I have selected about 35 and these will be posted in intervals the coming week.

Stay tuned !

Yours sincerely,

Sir Cliff

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Sir Cliff,

Great photos ! Brings back memories of the tour as I was one of the 'Shadows'.

Keep 'en coming.

All the best,

Fred

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Just northeast of the Quarry is the Grandstand.

It was here that general Rawlinson vieuwed the progress of the battle on 01-07-16.

The pole indicates the approximate position

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The weather was not favourable to make clear photo' s as it was clouded and hazy.

But this was the vieuw that general Rawlinson had of Albert with the golden virgin

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