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Remembered Today:

Prince Abbas


grantmal
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Can anyone help with information on the Prince Abbas, which operated at Gallipoli? I have seen it referred to as a small steamer, and it appeared to be used to transfer troops between ship and shore. Thanks in advance,

Grant

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Hi Grant

There was a 315 ton passenger steamer called Prince Abbas, which was built by Fairfield at Govan in 1886 as Yard No.319, launched in August 1886, but I don’t know anything more about it. I.D. No. 41594

Cheers Ron

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Hello Grant

PRINCE ABBAS, a 2030 ton Egyption passenger ship, built 1892 for the Khedive Steamship Co. Requisitioned in 1915 and transfered various units of the Australian forces to Anzac Cove in August. Sold 1916 to the Hudson bay Co. Torpedoed and sunk by U 52 29 miles east from Fair Isle/Tyne/Lerwick 9.7.17.

Regards John

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Oops. Wrong ship! Article removed. The one mentioned by spithead (John) seems to be it. The Office Number was 110138, so if you search the National Archives (UK) catalogue, on just this number, it may return some ships agreements and crew lists and/or ship logs.

regards

Martin

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I saw that one, but Grant said it was a small ship :)

Ron

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Thanks lads, John's ship seems to be the one. The Prince Abbas was staffed briefly in July 1915 by members of one of the 3rd Australian Field Ambulance's tent subdivisions. The crew - "all the scum of the Balkan states" - mutinied in early July and were replaced by 'bluejackets' on July 8th.

Good on you,

Grant

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Grant, award to crew PRINCE ABBAS, so `she was there' at Gallipoli ;

MADGE Ernest Edward N/E Lt. RNR 80E045 Prince Abbas

Vice Admiral Commanding Eastern Mediterranean Squadron

14.03.16 Gazetted

Landing Gallipoli Peninsula April 1915 & Evacuation Dec. 1915 - Jan 1916 DSC

Performed good service during the landing on the 25th April, under heavy fire, and on subsequent days.

Regards Sadsac

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I saw that one, but Grant said it was a small ship :)

Ron

Actually, Ron, it may very well have been the smaller vessel. The 315 ton steamer Prince Abbas was built in 1886 as part of a new service of Nile steamers established by Messrs Thomas Cook and Son. An ad in The Times on 11 Jul 1894 gives brief details of the "First Class Tourist Steamer" as length 160, breadth 20, horsepower 300.

In the book "The Fighting Newfoundlander", 2006, Gerald W.L. Nicholson describes the Newfoundland Regiment going to Gallipoli in the "little Prince Abbas":

On The following afternoon,

a Sunday, a small coastal steamer, the Prince Abbas hove to beside

the large vessel [the Ausonia], and the transfer of the heavily-laden soldiers

down the gangplanks was accomplished without delay.

It was half-past three when the Prince Abbas steamed out of

Mudros Harbour and, rounding the south-eastern corner of

Lemnos Island, pointed her bow north-eastward towards the

sound of the distant guns.

Also a mention of the Prince Abbas in "Men of Gallipoli: The Dardanelles and Gallipoli Experience, etc.", by Peter Liddle (1976).

regards,

Martin

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Martin, Sadsac, thanks for the subsequent posts. Martin -- the quote above about the crew was preceded by, "This boat is about 2000 tons..." so it obviously refers to the 1892 Egyptian ship. Sorry I didn't post that bit earlier. When I started the topic I knew I had some reference to the Prince Abbas here somewhere but doubted I could find it - piles of papers on the floor and desk do not make for an efficient filing system.

Thanks again,

Grant

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  • 14 years later...

Hi Grant,

I too am after information about the Prince Abbas. My great grandfather was evacuated on it from Gallipoli. I know it has been a few years since this post was written but I was wondering if you found any photographs of the Prince Abbas? I am doing up a folder of my great grandfathers WW1 experience to give to my family. 

Thanks.

Christine

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Christine,

Not the best image I’m affraid, but take a look at the drawing on the poster (bottom right).

MB

6787A04A-857F-475C-BC4E-1A51D98DCE6F.jpeg

Edited by KizmeRD
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Better stiil this photo…

MB

 

0B87BCB5-D6E5-4390-8D02-1B8EDDF826FB.jpeg

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PRINCE ABBAS was built on the Clyde by Govan Shipbuilding & Engineering Ltd. in 1886. The ship was 160 ft long/313 grt. 
Originally used as a Nile paddle steamer for Thomas Cook passengers, she then got purchased in December 1915 by the Royal Indian Marine for service in Mesopotamia (as a troop carrier). Named after the son of the Khadive.

MB

 

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Good morning,

 

Thank you for the replies  but I am wondering if they are the same ship as the below statement is from my great grandads diary and he mentions it was similar to the Clacton.

 

"30th June 1915 – after several warnings the balance of the troops from the Minnewaska boarded the Prince Abbas steamer boat similar to the Clacton, which also had ammunition and stores aboard."

HMHS_Clacton.jpg

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4 hours ago, CamJack said:

Thank you for the replies  but I am wondering if they are the same ship as the below statement is from my great grandads diary and he mentions it was similar to the Clacton.

My apologies, after further research, the ex Nile River paddle steamer PRINCE ABBAS used as a troop transport in Mesopotamia during WW1 is not the same vessel as the former Khedivial Mail Lines passenger cargo ship HMT PRINCE ABBAS that was used as a troop transport throughout the Gallipoli campaign. 
Haven’t yet found a photo of this (larger) steamship. As referred to in previous posts on this thread, what we do know is that this ship (of the same name) was also Clyde built, completed in 1892 by Robert Napier, Govan, a single screw steamship of 2,030 grt. HMT PRINCE ABBAS transported many units both to and from Gallipoli, including several British, Newfoundland and Australian units. Her Captain Lt. Cdr. Ernest Edward Madge RNR was awarded the DSO. She was a regular traveller between Marseilles and Mudros and was an active participant in both the initial landings and the eventual withdraw. Torpedoed and sunk later in the war in Scottish waters.

MB

Edited by KizmeRD
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5 hours ago, KizmeRD said:

HMT PRINCE ABBAS that was used as a troop transport throughout the Gallipoli campaign. 

Although used as a transport during landings, she was, in fact, a commissioned RN warship (Armed Boarding Steamer) HMS PRINCE ABBAS. She landed the Newfoundland Regiment on the night of 19-20 Sep at Suvla Bay and had previously (11 Sep) landed 27th Infantry Bn AIF at Anzac.

5 hours ago, KizmeRD said:

Her Captain Lt. Cdr. Ernest Edward Madge RNR was awarded the DSO.

DSC (not DSO) in HMS CORNWALLIS:  "Lieutenant Ernest Edward Madge, R.N.R. Performed good service during the landing on 25th April, under heavy fire, and on subsequent days." He was i/c the CORNWALLIS Beach Party at 'V' Beach. He commanded HMS PRINCE ABBAS from June until mid-August 1915. Also MiD for Gallipoli -  https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/29507/supplement/2868

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Thank you for the information. I have emailed a couple of naval museums both here and England but no photos! I might try Newfoundland Regiment next.

 

Christine :)

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Christine,

A better bet for obtaining a photograph would be to contact the University of Glasgow Archives at  library-asc@gla.ac.uk. making sure you give them as much detail of the ship as possible especially the name and Official Number which has already been given to you.

The UGA Archives have many Clyde Shipbuilder's photographs and plans details of which are not available on line you have to ask.  They do do have other records of Robert Napier of Govan, who built the PRINCE ABBAS for the Khedivial Mail Line, so there is a fair chance they may have photos and plans, nearly all ships built were recorded with photos, including launching and fitting out photos.  Most of the Clyde Shipbuilding records came to the Archives through Upper Clyde Shipbuilders, so do not appear under the original builder's name, they will sort that out for you.

I have always found the UGA staff very helpful and friendly and compared with other Maritime institutions and museums very reasonable in price and quick to respond.

Good luck in your search. 

Just by the way, the PRINCE ABBAS was quite a bit larger than the CLACTON which was a North Sea Cargo ship owned by the Great Eastern Railway Co.  the PRINCE ABBAS would, almost certainly, have had passenger accommodation as the Khedivial Mail Line was engaged in the pilgrim trade, amongst other trades, and would have been a lot faster, hence her use as an armed boarding steamer between 1915 and 1916

Tony

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