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Remembered Today:

What WW1 books are you reading?


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Shirley

I agree with you on "Gallipoli Mission" a fascinating account of Bean trying to piece together what actually happened at ANZAC I took a copy (borrowed from the local library and long over due when returned) with me when I went there. You can now download a copy from the AWM site.

Ive just finished Beans Gallipoli Diary which is a great read.

Tim

Bean's work on Gallipoli has had a huge impact. In my opinion he is one of the godfather's of this area of research. His powerful books formed the basis of Peter Weir's movie, Gallipoli. It inspired Peter so much, he went and visited Anzac Cove and then the work began.

Lynz :lol:

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susanhemmings

Thought it about time I did some serious reading:

Just started "Forgotten Lunatics of the Great War". Making very interesting reading so far. Whipping backwards and forwards through all the footnotes....

I cannot help smiling at some of the comments the soldiers have made when being interviewed, but I nearly always find myself in tears at the same time.

Very sad. Poor blighters. God bless each and every one of them.

Susan.

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southerncross116

I'm about halfway through 'Over There' by Fred Freidel. The version I have - from something called 'the Classics of War' collection, seems to have a fair amount of typograhical errors.

Decent book, if you can decipher the spelling & typographical errors; it was first published in 1964.

Edited: - the copy that I have was published by Burford Books in 2002.

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Forgotten Lunatics? Is that another from Max Arthur's series?

Review on Tom Morgan's Hellfire Corner.

Publisher details and ISBN at the bottom.

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Oh thank you very much. It seems like a good read. Factual with emotion, a good balance. If you liked that one you may like Ben Shephard's "A War of Nerves"

Shephard's Book

I enjoyed this one thoroughly

Lynz :lol:

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Not quite. 'Forgotten Lunatics' is an academic book and not emotional. Its content may affect the reader emotionally, however.

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The way it is portrayed in reviews is being emotional as well as academic. If that is the case, it is a good thing. It takes a talented writer to be able to do that. Even if it is not the case, if it is written so well it is emotional for the reader, it is also good.

Lynz :lol:

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The way it is portrayed in reviews is being emotional as well as academic. If that is the case, it is a good thing.

Academic writing has evidently changed, then. Emotion used to be seen as interfering with the objectivity of the analysis.

I haven't myself seen any reviews that suggested that 'Forgotten Lunatics' itself is emotional in style. It certainly didn't come across so when I read it. As Susan rightly said, it's a very absorbing book, in which the ill soldiers' own words are powerfully affecting.

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I seem to have mixed myself up :wacko: I meant that it would be good if the writing could portray the emotion of the people it is about. Writer's emotion leads to bias etc... I think I've had to much fizzy juice and happy thoughts today! :D

Lynz :lol:

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susanhemmings
Forgotten Lunatics? Is that another from Max Arthur's series?

Lynz ?

Lynz, its by Peter Barham. Bit tough going. But enjoyable, if that is the correct word. very sad actually. But also extremely interesting how these chaps were treated. And I have only just started. An eye opener for sure. Must agree with Gwyn. (and also have had to admit to getting the dictionary out on more than one occasion because I simply had not heard of some of the words used by the author).

Susan.

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susanhemmings

For sure Lynz. There are hundreds of footnotes in it. (all further references to further books). But it is interesting and I think it will be tough going for me but I am so interested in these poor chaps that its hard (for me at least) to read it without being emotionally affected. (a distinct possibility as Gwyn rightly says). But, I will only read one or two chapters per night in order to digest what I have read.

Susan.

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I hope you like it. I hesitate to say 'enjoy'. I admit that there were times when I just couldn't concentrate any more because it was proving a demanding read under pressure.

I wish I could say that all people with mental health problems can nowadays be assured of timely, sympathetic and effective treatment, but I can't.

(A search on Forgotten Lunatics on the forum will throw up other discussions.)

Gwyn

Edited by Dragon
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Just finished reading The Somme by Peter Hart.

I just got my copy of The Hell They Called High Wood for Father's Day and I'm almost done. It's taking longer than expected with the constant flipping from the accounts of the battle, to the maps, to the photographs. A very very good book.

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I've heard good thing's about Hart's book...are they justified? I am looking to buy a book on the Somme, due to the proposed tour next year.

Lynz :lol:

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Yes. It was a good read. Lots of personal accounts which brought life to the story, as if it needed it.

It's not overly rich in maps, but his description of the front line action by division (from north to south) on July 1 is excellent.

If I had anything poor to say about it, it was his constantly reminding the reader of the importance of massed artillery. He may be completely justified in his conclusions, but if I knew nothing about The Somme and read his book, I could tell you if the attack was going to be a success or failure based on his comments regarding the bombardment.

I would recommend it.

If you are going to High Wood, read Terry Norman's book. The detail is so terrific you can visualize the companies entering the wood on the aireal photos.

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Just started "The Unknown Soldier" by Neil Hanson, Corgi Books, 13579108642.

Only read the first 3 chapters and enjoying the read. Only niggle is in chapters 2 and 3 where he refers to 15th Battalion Civil Service Rifles.

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Was at a book store last night and picked up Tommy, The British Soldier on the Western Front by Richard Holmes.

Looks like a good start to my summer reading.

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Im trying to read P Simkins Kitchener's Armies. I keep getting side tracked so I've almost done Chapter 1 lol! I've flicked through and read several chapters in the middle just not all the way through. Would recommend it but it is more academic and takes alot of concerntration!

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