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What WW1 books are you reading?

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Len Trim

Currently reading volume iv of the Churchill Companion the primary sources for Martin Gilbert's magnum opus on Churchill. Attention currently on demobilisation of the conscript army and the rapid build up of a volunteer army. Just coming to the creation of the Black and Tans fascinating as my paternal grandfather was one.

Unfortunately can't find a copy of volume v, the exchequer years, for under £100 which I am not prepared to pay.

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MikeyH

Picked up yesterday, a 2014 reprint 'With the Kaiser's army in 1914'.  The original published in England in 1915 was titled 'With the German Armies in the West', the author was Swedish, one Sven Hedin.  Have seen a mention somewhere that he was very much pro-German.  Is a hefty book at 517 pages.

 

Mike.

 

 

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Michelle Young

Reading  In The Shadow Of Bois Hugo by Nigel Atter. A well researched book and nicely written.

 

Michelle 

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Scalyback

The Wonder Book of Soldiers. 

 

Picked up in a second hand book shop for a few pounds. A deuce odd book as no print date but is a blatant propaganda book for young lads to get information about the British Army and does talk down on even the French Army. It does include a lot of photographs including cavalrymen using the horse as a shooting aid. I have never seen this or heard about this before. 

A very good section on uniforms(prices given for most uniforms) and badges including a picture guide to badges(including where certain parts of the badge go/changes for different units) that may be of interest to Grumpy/Frogsmile. Plus a few boys own articles of pure British stiff upper lip. 

 

Clearly a great war publication as it briefly refers to Kitchener recruits but no other reference to the war. All photos do pre date 1915 I would say as the equipment and uniforms "look" 1914/15. 

As I say a deuce odd publication but very informative as a contemporary publication. If any one is interested I will scan some of the pages . 

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daggers

There was a long series of Wonder Books, and I expect the Soldiers version was updated from time to time.

Some books had wonderful endpapers by the great W. Heath Robinson.

D

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Scalyback
On ‎26‎/‎08‎/‎2018 at 14:28, daggers said:

There was a long series of Wonder Books, and I expect the Soldiers version was updated from time to time.

Some books had wonderful endpapers by the great W. Heath Robinson.

D

 

It does indeed have a Heath Robinson cartoon at the rear, unfortunately a child at some point has used a paint brush on it. 

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Marilyne

About time I started with something related to the last 100 days, just to keep the pace with history, and so I have discovered I had a copy of John Terraine's "To Win a War" in my library and after reviewing your thoughts on this forum, I have downloaded Charles Messenger's "The Day we Won the War" on my Kindle. 

 

M. 

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Crunchy

Both are good books and well worth reading Marilyne. Some others you might read are:

 

Jonathan Boff Winning and Losing on the Western Front: The British Third Army and the Defeat of Germany 1918;

Ashley Ekins ( Editor) 1918: Year of Victory: The end of the Great War and the shaping of history;

David Stevenson With our Backs to the Wall: Victory and Defeat in 1918. Chapter 2 covers the 100 Days

 

For the Americans, a detailed account is Edward G. Lengel To Conquer Hell: The Battle of the Meuse - Argonne 1918.

 

Not much on the French effort as far as I know. Probably the best I have read is the relevant chapter in Robert A. Doughty Pyrrhic Victory: French Strategy and Operations in the Great War

 

Regards

Chris

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MikeMeech
18 hours ago, Marilyne said:

About time I started with something related to the last 100 days, just to keep the pace with history, and so I have discovered I had a copy of John Terraine's "To Win a War" in my library and after reviewing your thoughts on this forum, I have downloaded Charles Messenger's "The Day we Won the War" on my Kindle. 

 

M. 

Hi Marilyne

 

You may find 'Pouring with rain - Troops fed up:  British Second Army and the Liberation Offensive in Flanders 1918' by Dennis Williams, of particular interest.

 

Mike

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Marilyne

Thanks for the tip, Mike, I'll look that up! 

 

M. 

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Martin Bennitt

Just finished "Elsie and Mairi go to war"by Diane Atkinson. A fascinating tale of two remarkable women who have featured in various threads on this Forum. The extra details Diane Atkinson has ferreted out, e.g. that Elsie Knocker's second husband, the aristocratic Belgian aviator, collaborated with the Germans in World War II, add a great deal to the story. I would quibble with a few things, but that's why I'm a member of the GWF.

 

Cheers Martin B

 

 

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Rob B

Picked up 'March to Armistice 1918' by Christopher Haworth in a local Oxfam yesterday - so cracking on with that

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Biggles

Hello Chaps,

 

Just finished reading 'For Love and Courage'.  It is made up of a series of letters from Lt-Colonel E W Hermon DSO, to his wife 1914-1917.  It is a great read and rather emotional since he was KIA on the 9th April 1917, while commanding 24th Btn. Northumberland Fusiliers.  One of his daughters kept all the letters and her daughter (his grand-daughter) put them into a book.

Certainly worth the read!

 

Cheers,

Caleb

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The Scorer
On ‎01‎/‎08‎/‎2018 at 17:02, Barnbarroch said:

I'm glad you enjoyed the book, Frank was certainly a character though not very politically correct from the perspective of the 21st century. I think we opted for end notes because some of them were rather long and might have disrupted the text a bit.

Regards,

Jamie Vans.

 

On ‎01‎/‎08‎/‎2018 at 19:15, Black Maria said:

The endnotes were only a minor irritant :)  A brilliant book , thank you for editing and getting it published . The phrase "They don't make 'em like that anymore"

certainly applies to your great uncle . I'm just surprised the book hasn't had more coverage in the forum's book section , it certainly deserves to .

 

 

I've just finished reading the book, and I enjoyed it.

 

I don't have a problem with end notes, as long as I can discipline myself to keep a second marker in the book at the right place! It's often useful to know who the author is talking about, and also it's interesting to see who they served with or came across in their service.

 

I agree about Frank's character, but I was surprised to read what seemed to me to be complete hatred of Germany and (some) Germans. I think that this is rare amongst war books, most of whose authors are at pains not to utter such thoughts, even though they might have felt them at the time. Frank, though, didn't do that, and at times the book is an uncomfortable read - but it's also a reminder that at 100 years distance and in completely different circumstances, it's impossible to judge what they went through and saw.

 

I don't think that I have read a book which covered three different areas of service - the trenches, the tanks and captivity - before, and it taught me a lot about each of the areas. Jamie and Peter Widdowson deserve our thanks for bringing this book into being, and I would recommend it to anyone.

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Marilyne

hi all,

 

Just started a two-weeks stint at a very boring "ops" in a very boring place in the Brussels suburbs but prepared for said boring two weeks by raiding the library and so, in the spirit on conttinuing the work on the Last 100 Days, have borrowed Gregory Blaxland's book on Amiens and Bill Rawling's "Une façon de faire la guerre: La prise de Cambrai, Octobre 2018".

Anybody else read that last one?? any good??

And as said already: Charles Messenger's "The day we won the War" is also on the list for the next weeks.

 

M.

 

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Hllda Ball

Hello,Just starting G. P. A Fildes, "Iron Times With the Guards". Coldstream Guards Officer.

 

H.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bernard_Lewis

'The Unreturning Army' by Huntley Gordon. Nicely written with a bit of humour. After one soldier attended a cookery course, Gordon commented that the only change was that rissoles were now oblong not round!

 

Bernard

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Donald D
On 20/09/2018 at 18:11, Bernard_Lewis said:

'The Unreturning Army' by Huntley Gordon. Nicely written with a bit of humour. After one soldier attended a cookery course, Gordon commented that the only change was that rissoles were now oblong not round!

 

Bernard

I've had that book for some time, 2 copies actually but that's another story, so after your comment I think that will be the next one to read!

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Bernard_Lewis
3 hours ago, Donald D said:

I've had that book for some time, 2 copies actually but that's another story, so after your comment I think that will be the next one to read!

Finished it a couple of days ago. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

 

Bernard

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