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Remembered Today:

nicknames for germans


stephensmithbb1
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In a letter I am transcribing the writer uses the term “Willie” as a name for the Germans. “Now Willie didn’t half shell us while we were digging” and “We used to laugh and say here comes more iron rations from Willie put you tin hats on.” Now I know that William was the Kaiser and the name refers to him but Willie as a nickname German soldiers I have not come across before for. Can any one tell me if it was in common use through out the army during the war or perhaps even before?What other nicknames were given to the Germans by different countries and what did they call the allies apart from Tommy?

What other nicknames were given to the Germans by different countries and what did they call the allies apart from Tommy?

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From Tony R. De Bruyne, Soldatentaal (only in Dutch (Flemish)

For German soldiers

Alboche - Alleman - Alleyman - Attila - Big Willie - Bobosse - Boche - Caboche - Chleuh - Culotte Grise - Doryphore - Er aus - Ewe lamb - Fantaboche - Feldlepel - Field Grey - Fritz - Gerboy - Germhun - Gerry - Gris - Handen auf - Hans - Hans Wurst - Haricot-vert - Heine - Heinie - Hiney - Hun - Ia ia - Jerry - John Bullock - Johnny - Kameraad - Kraut - Little willie - Ludwig - Mange-tout - Markepakkers - Mof - Platkop - Prisco - Sauer-krauter - Sausage - Skull and Crossbones Husar - Square head - Super-boche - Taupe - Tête carrée - Teuton - Tirps - Vert de Gris - Witte profeten

(Of course some must have been more frequent than others. And some of them were given by French and Flemish soldiers, not by British.)

Aurel

P.S. By the way, being interested in linguistics, I found Ewe Lamb my favourite. And English speaking member over there who can guess what the origin is ? :P

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Sorry, I forgot the British soldiers

Atkins - Djick (Flemish name, but I found the explanation ... "nice", entertaining, imaginative, creative, but not sure if ... justified ;-). I wonder if British members can guess. No, don't ! For I would have to use a vulgar word, and might be banned from the Forum ! B)

- Imperial - Jam - Jamboer - Jamdooze - Jampot - Jamstamper - Kaki - Lime-juicer - Limy - Teapot - Tommie (Tommy) - Zweet

Somehow it seems to me that the German nicknames are more numerous. I wonder what ... -_-

Aurel

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Mr. Sercu, were there any "nicknames" for the American soldiers?

I know that some may have been interested in the "WBB Brigade"

in action around the Palingbeek. It may have even stood their

"eels" to attention. :o

Mt.Airy Doughboy

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I am Informed that the British called the American Soldiery some Most Rude Names in WW1,WW2,and again in Korea.Also Aurel in the Heady Days of 14/15 i believe that the German Troops were also Known as "The Baby Killers",and "Field Greys". :D

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In the BAOR of the mid fifties we referred to Germans as krauts or deutsches. That sounds more like a WW2 hangover?

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PBI,

Baby Killers ? Well, allow me to give no comment. ;)

"Mr Rogers" from Maryland, here they come :

Amerlos - Amerloque - Amex - Big Red One - Buck-private - Buddy - Bunkie - Cosmoliners - Cowboys - Darkee (Darkey, Darkie, Darky) - Devil dog - Dog robber - Doughboy - Dust-distributer - Gravel agitator (Gravel crusher) - Gob - Jackie - Méricain (Merikin, Merriker) - Mud cruncher - New York - Old hickory - Old issue - Plebe - Rainbow division - Redlegs - Roughnecks - O'Ryan Roughnecks - Sam (Sammie, Sammy) - Teddie (Teddy) - Teufelshund - Yank(ee) - Yankee doodle.

(Some of course for a specific category.)

Any questions Mr. Rogers ? :D

Aurel

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At this Moment in Time,Our Troops in Iraq and Afghanistan are collectively known to the Coalition Forces by the Nicknames of 1) The Flintstones,because our Equipment is Prehistoric.And 2) The Borrowers,because We have to Borrow or Beg Any Sophisticated Equipment that we need from Our Allies....

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P.S. By the way, being interested in linguistics, I found Ewe Lamb my favourite. And English speaking member over there who can guess what the origin is ? :P

From Uhlan (German = Ulan)?

Mick

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Mr. Sercu, don't forget "Jarheads" and "Gyrene" for the Marine Corps, however, this was WW2

and until now I believe. I am only familiar with "Doughboy" and also "Johnny" I have heard for WW1.

Another is just plain "GI" for the Army, = government issue.

Bill ;)

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Vlaams vrienden,

I read in that excellent book about Poperinge in the war (the title I forget; it is a Flemish publication) the word "jampotten", which was clearly to describe Brits. This, I believe, is plural for "jampot", so it is an obvious reference.

But I have never seen it anywhere else. Was it a word only used by those in Poperinge, do you think?

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It is recorded in the book:

"The Imperial War Museum Book of 1918 Year of Victory by Malcolm Brown,

that some Americans did refer to German's as "Dutch":-

page 149: "They take one trench and keep on going and the Dutchmen (i.e. the Deutschers, meaning the Germans) are ready to quit."

page 160: " the Hun that killed him was also killed as some of Earle's papers were found in the pocket of a dead Dutchman."

Connaught Stranger. :D

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The Americans (Pennsylvania in particular) still use the term 'Dutch' ie 'Pennsylvania Dutch' originating, I believe, from quite some time ago when the German speaking Swiss emigrated to the US.

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Welsh language references include the usual Fritz, Hwn, Jeri, Jyrman, but also ELLMYN (German), and my favourite is German soldiers refered to as 'Herod' The Biblical King Herod.

A letter by a serving soldier in Welsh refers to a "We repelled the children of Herod with rifles and grenades".

Welsh soldiers refered to as 'Bilis' a reference to Billy the Royal Welsh Fusilier Goat

Bantam Soldiers - The Doodle Doos

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And as Aurel said it, the 3 main ones used by us -the French- are: Boche, (S)chleu & Teuton. But these terms were much more used by the French population during WWII than WWI. And I've always wondered about the origins of "Boche". The French resistance also used "Doryphores" as a usual term, even painting it as a name on one of our French SAS Squadron Jeeps ("Mort aux Doryphores" to be precise).

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'Our Field Greys' was in wide use in Germany at the start of the war (of course in the German language) and was the simple equinelant of Tommies.

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'Doryphore' is the French name for the Colorado beetle, which is a pest that preys on potato crops – so presumably it meant 'potato eaters'.

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