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Remembered Today:

HMS BRAZEN ca 1909


Crab
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My grandfather's first posting, after I assume basic training at HMS NELSON, was as a Stoker 2nd class on HMS BRAZEN from 26 May to 24 July 1909, which was parented by HMS HECLA. As HECLA was a destroyer depot ship can I assume therefore that BRAZEN was a destroyer of some type. I Googled Brazen and 90% was about Prince Andrew and that Brazen and others about the wreck off Newhaven. Please can anyone put flesh on the bones of the 1909 variant.

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My grandfather's first posting, after I assume basic training at HMS NELSON, was as a Stoker 2nd class on HMS BRAZEN from 26 May to 24 July 1909, which was parented by HMS HECLA. As HECLA was a destroyer depot ship can I assume therefore that BRAZEN was a destroyer of some type. I Googled Brazen and 90% was about Prince Andrew and that Brazen and others about the wreck off Newhaven. Please can anyone put flesh on the bones of the 1909 variant.

Generally, I've always found this site to be quite useful when starting research of a ship

http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/brazen_class.htm

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Hello & welcome to the Forum,

The British Destroyer by T. D. Manning gives for Brazen:-

Built at Clydebank. 345-350 tons. 214 x 20 x 8.3 feet. 5,800 h.p. = 30 knots. Normand boilers. One 12 pounder. Two torpedo tubes. Complement 63. Served in Home waters.

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345-350 tons.

Hi Arabis.

That seems pretty light. I realise the different classes over the years have varied but I thought that destroyers were generally a little heavier than this, around the 1000 ton mark.

regards,

Martin

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Sorry, ignore that. Just noted that it was pre-war and it seems to have been a t.b.d., torpedo boat destroyer. Not an overly authoritative source but, of pre-war destroyers, Wikipedia states:

Between 1890 and 1914 destroyers became markedly larger: initially 300 tons was a good size, but by the start of the First World War 1000 tons was not unusual.

Martin

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Sorry, ignore that. Just noted that it was pre-war and it seems to have been a t.b.d., torpedo boat destroyer. Not an overly authoritative source but, of pre-war destroyers, Wikipedia states:

Between 1890 and 1914 destroyers became markedly larger: initially 300 tons was a good size, but by the start of the First World War 1000 tons was not unusual.

Martin

Gentlemen

Many thanks for your welcome to the Forum but more particularly your imediate response to my query and guidance to useful websites. There will be more questions I can assure you.

From a Grateful Crab (RAF)

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Crab.

The only mention I could find of the Brazen in The Times for this period is her involvement in the annual naval exercises, quite a big affair in 1909. She was part of the Portsmouth Flotilla.

The Times, Thursday, Jun 17, 1909

The Naval Mobilization

The Fleets which were at Spithead on

Saturday last have separated and left for their

stations in preparation for the exercises and

manoeuvres which at to begin on June 29 and

to last for three weeks. To those Fleets,

numbering in all 144 vessels, there will be added

to-day more than 200 vessels, of which the

Mediterranean supplies 15, and there were

some 30 small craft in full commission as

well. [More]

Portsmouth Flotilla

Captain Reginald Y. Tyrwhitt, in command

(Hecla).

Torpedo-boat Destroyers.- Bat, Brazen, ..

The National Archives have a number of the Brazen's log, including those for this period in two ADM 53 (Ships' Logs) records:

Piece ADM 53/18093, 1909 May 8 - 1909 July 8

Piece ADM 53/18094, 1909 July 1 - 1909 Aug 31

regards,

Martin

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The Brazen appears to have been the name ship of the Brazen Class. There is a photo here of HMS Recruit, which was also of this class. In 1896, The Times reported the coming deployment of the new t.d.b.'s to Portsmouth, Devonport and Chatham:

The Times, Friday, Jul 31, 1896

Of the 28 30-knot destroyers previously ordered..

..Portmouth and Devonport will each have ten and

Chatham will have eight, as follows:- Portsmouth. -

Brazen, Electra, Recruit, Vulture, Star, Whiting,

Bat, Chamois,Craven, Flying Fish.

Photos of some of the Star Class destroyers are here. Not sure what the differences were between the Brazen Class and Star Class.

regards,

Martin

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