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Remembered Today:

Cpl. George Smith


Peter Bennett
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I was in Lincolnshire yesterday and came across this grave when visiting the cemetery to photograph a requirement for the MLLP. He must have been a very brave man to be awarded the DCM twice, does anyone have any history on him.

Name: SMITH, GEORGE

Initials: G

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Corporal

Regiment/Service: Royal Engineers

Unit Text: 1st Reserve Bn.

Age: 32

Date of Death: 25/10/1918

Service No: 19344

Awards: D C M and Bar

Additional information: Husband of Catherine May Smith, of London Rd., Kirton.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: GG. 9.

Cemetery: KIRTON OLD CEMETERY

post-7183-1204019009.jpg

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Good Morning Peter,

I have found George on the 1901 census, his occupation is down as Wheelwright Journeyman on the census form and Samuel, his father, was a Farm Labourer.

Llew.

1901 England Census

about George Smith

Name: George Smith

Age: 16

Estimated Birth Year: abt 1885

Relation: Son

Father's Name: Samuel

Mother's Name: Mary A

Gender: Male

Where born: Boston, Lincolnshire, England

Civil Parish: Kirton

Ecclesiastical parish: Holland Fen

County/Island: Lincolnshire

Country: England

Street address:

Occupation:

Condition as to marriage:

Education:

Employment status: View Image

Registration district: Boston

Sub-registration district: Kirton

ED, institution, or vessel: 8

Neighbors: View others on page

Household schedule number: 45

Household Members: Name Age

Eliza Hadcock 83

Charles Smith 1

George Smith 16

Harry Smith 4

Klara Smith 7

Mary A Smith 43

Samuel Smith 42

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His DCM citation appeared in London Gazette #29212, dated 30th June 1915.

19344 Sapper Smith, G. 15th Field Company, Royal Engineers

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at Neuve Chapelle, on 10th March, 1915, in continuing to make loopholes and block up openings in a wall, under heavy rifle and machine gun fire, and completing the work though bricks were frequently knocked down after being set in position. Sapper Smith has previously displayed great steadiness under fire.

Link to Gazette is Here

Bar to DCM, London Gazette #29760, dated 22nd September 1916.

19344 Actg. Cpl. G, Smith, R.E.

For conspicuous gallantry. He voluntarily crossed over 300 yards of "No Man's Land'' in broad daylight, and, though fired at by machine guns and rifles, dressed the wounds of men lying near the enemy's wire. After collecting food and water for them from dead men lying round, he, assisted by a corporal, partly dragged and partly carried the two worst cases back to our lines.

Link to Gazette is Here

Regards

Steve

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Thanks Guys, I wonder if he died of wounds at home, it was probably a bit early for the 'Flu epedemic.

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  • 5 years later...

This is copied from an auction site that sold his medals

The Great War 1915 'Neuve Chapelle' D.C.M. and '1916' Bar Group of Four to Corporal G. Smith, Royal Engineers, For Conspicuous Gallantry in Rescuing in Broad Daylight Under Heavy Machine-Gun Fire Two Wounded Men Lying Near The Enemy's Wire a) Distinguished Conduct Medal, G.V.R., with Second Award Bar (19344 Sapr. G. Smith. 15/F.Co. R.E.) B) 1914 Star (19344 Sapr: G. Smith. R.E.) c) British War and Victory Medals (19344 A. Sjt. G. Smith. R.E.), virtually mint state, with three original named card boxes of issue, and the following related items: - Record Office enclosure for the British War and Victory Medals - The recipient's 1914 Christmas postcard from Lady Rawlinson - Four photographs of the recipient, including one of him shoeing a horse, c.1908 - Copy of the recipient's Obituary, reprinted from the Lincolnshire Standard, 2.11.1918 (4) Estimate £ 2,800-3,200 D.C.M. London Gazette 30.6.1915 19344 Sapper Smith, G. 15th Field Company, Royal Engineers 'For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at Neuve Chapelle, on 10th March, 1915, in continuing to make loopholes and block up openings in a wall, under heavy rifle and machine gun fire, and completing the work though bricks were frequently knocked down after being set in position. Sapper Smith has previously displayed great steadiness under fire.' D.C.M. Second Award Bar London Gazette 22.9.1916 39344 Actg. Cpl. G. Smith, R.E. 'For conspicuous gallantry. He voluntarily crossed over 300 yards of "No Man's Land'' in broad daylight, and, though fired at by machine guns and rifles, dressed the wounds of men lying near the enemy's wire. After collecting food and water for them from dead men lying round, he, assisted by a corporal, partly dragged and partly carried the two worst cases back to our lines.' 19344 Corporal George Smith, D.C.M., was born in Kirton, Lincolnshire, 1888, and prior to his Army service was employed as a village blacksmith. In 1908 he enlisted in the Royal Engineers, and was posted with them to Gibraltar; following the outbreak of the Great War he served on the Western Front for three years from 5.11.1914, before returning to England in 1917 suffering from the effects of gas; advanced Corporal and acting Sergeant, he subsequently served as Drill Instructor for the 1st Reserve Battalion, Royal Engineers at Chatham. Corporal Smith died of pneumonia, 24.10.1918, and is buried in Kirton Old Cemetery, Lincolnshire. Following his death the General Officer Commanding, Brigadier- General A.L. Schrieber, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O., paid tribute to him, 'saying that he had knew Corporal Smith personally as a soldier, and a better soldier he had never met. Not only as a fighting soldier in France, but as a soldier at home, he was one of the best N.C.O.s, and he knew he would sooner have died on the battlefield than have died as he did, and he was proud of having had the honour of pinning the D.C.M. and Bar on his breast.' (Lincolnshire Standard, 2.11.1918 refers).

Sold for £4,500

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  • 2 months later...
Guest jetteedwards

George Smith was my grandfather's brother. His parents were George and Susannah Smith who are buried next to him in Kirton old cemetery. He was born in Wyberton which is a parish close by and in the 1901 census was living with them aged 13 in Donington road Frampton. In the 1911 census at the age of 23 his occupation is listed as a blacksmith and a Sapper Royal Engineers at the Royal Engineer Barracks Brompton and St Mary's R.E. Barracks.

regards

Jette

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