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Remembered Today:

POWs at Kut


jkalirai
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My first post...my great-grandfather Gulzara Singh was a Jemadar in the 76th punjabis that were captured at Kut El Amara during the War. Is there any way to verify if he was a POW? Any other specific information available? I know he

received an IDSM, possibly for this?

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My first post...my great-grandfather Gulzara Singh was a Jemadar in the 76th punjabis that were captured at Kut El Amara during the War. Is there any way to verify if he was a POW? Any other specific information available? I know he

received an IDSM, possibly for this?

Jemadar was a rank used in the British Indian Army, where it was the lowest rank for a Viceroy's Commissioned Officer (VCO). Jemadars either commanded platoons or troops themselves or assisted their British commander. They also filled regimental positions such as Assistant Quartermaster (Jemadar Quartermaster) or Assistant Adjutant (Jemadar Adjutant).

It remained in use in the Indian Army until 1965 as the lowest rank of Junior Commissioned Officer (JCO). The rank of Jemadar was later renamed in both the Indian Army and the Pakistan Army as Naib Subedar in infantry units, and Naib Risaldar in cavalry and armoured corps units.

The rank remains in use in the paramilitary police hierarchy.

Paul

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My first post...my great-grandfather Gulzara Singh was a Jemadar in the 76th punjabis that were captured at Kut El Amara during the War. Is there any way to verify if he was a POW? Any other specific information available? I know he

received an IDSM, possibly for this?

The 76th Punjabis came under 30th Infantry Brigade - log onto:- [scroll down to 30th Infantry Brigade]

http://www.stephen-stratford.co.uk/pte_wilby.htm

taken from web site:-

Kut falls

On 29 April 1916 Kut surrendered to the Turks. After agreeing terms, Townshend marched his troops out into captivity, and certain death for most of them. Most of the Arabs left in Kut were hanged by the Turks for helping the British.

Thus began the forced march from what is now Iraq into Turkey to prison camps. This forced march being a foretaste of similar marches in the Second World War, such as the forced march of American and Pilipino POWs on Bataan in 1942.

During May 1916, 2000 British Troops, including the Norfolks, started the march some were still in Khaki some were almost naked. The first day they walked 15 miles without food or water. Behind the column were many dead or dying, those who dropped out were killed by the Arab guards. They were first taken to a temporary camp at Shumran about 80 miles from Kut.

The Kurdish guards had stolen the troops food rations and even their water bottles and boots. The British officers were separated at Shumran and were taken up river by steamer leaving their men to walk and die. Wounded officers were then repatriated to India. From Kut to Baghdad is 100 miles, marching 12-15 miles a day lying at night on the open ground. They were herded like sheep by mounted guards with sticks and whips.

The route of the death march was through what is now Iraq into Turkey, a distance of over 400 miles: Aziziya, Baghdad, Tikrit, Mosul, Nisibin, Ras alAin, Mamourra and Aran

The American Ambassadors at Constantinople (Messrs. Morgenthau and Elkus) saw the results of the march and protested, but to no avail. Other diplomatic efforts during the siege, such as the payment of ransom to the Turkish Government, failed. It seems that the Turkish Government wished to impress its Central Power partners.

261 Norfolks were captured at Kut of whom only 78 ever returned to Norfolk, a rate of loss of 70%.; 7 out of every 10 Norfolks died during their captivity of maltreatment and disease

Paul

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Jason, if you post your query over at www.gmic.co.uk, their resident Indian expert Ed Haynes has the rolls and would be pleased to assist you.

I may be able to find some further information on his service from my library.

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Hi Michael...thanks, I have indeed posted it there. If you could, please check any books in your library that you think may have some information on his service.

Jason, if you post your query over at www.gmic.co.uk, their resident Indian expert Ed Haynes has the rolls and would be pleased to assist you.

I may be able to find some further information on his service from my library.

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See your other post - I've got a quote from the regimental history. It may be the deed that won him his IDSM.

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