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Remembered Today:

Flying Coal Miners


gmac101
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I have been researching the RAF careers of my Great Grandfather and his brother and I found their service record cards.

Like most people I found the cards a bit baffling but with reading around on the internet I have managed to make sense of them (I think). I'd like a it of advice on taking things forward and confirm some of my assumptions

James Frederick and George Hubert Carr[/size] They both joined together in May 1918 when they were 23 & 21 respectively. There service numbers were 137627 & 137628 I assume as before they joined up they were both working as Coal Miners near Barnsley they had been exempted from conscription. Is that correct? Did the rules change in 1918 or did they volunteer? Was it typical for working class men to end up as trainee pilot or observer officers? They were both intelligent men with some education, James Frederick later became a Mining Engineer and ran the Bradford Colliery in Manchester for some years, George became a Doctor. James was taken on as a pilot and started in the CDD or COD before transferring to the 2 OCW (Officer Cadet Wing?) and then to the No. 5 S of A (School of Aviation?) from late June until mid August where upon he is transferred for about a month to the Armament School. On the 23rd of September he is sent to Vendome. I assume this would be the ex RNAS training base in France? The next entry is in the middle of December when he is transferred from 59 Wing to 58 TDS. He then spends the next 3 months transferring between 58,59 & 57 TDS. I know that these were all training organisations based at RAF Cranwell in Lincolnshire or nearby. He is then discharged into the Class G reserve in March 1919 He was made an Honouray 2nd Lieutenant in Feb 1919 James was taken on as an Observer and completed his training with a spell at the Air & Infantry Cooperative School in mid September 1918. His special Duty was Corps Observer, what is this?. The next entry is on the 24th on October as he was wounded on the 23rd of October whilst flying with 8 Squadron. He spent 6 months in hospital and was then sent on sick leave before relinquishing his comission on the 15th Nov 1919. I can sometimes visit the National Archives. I assume it would not be difficult to find records of the incident when George was injured in the records of 8 Squadron or am I wrong? I would like to find out if James Frederick was ever involved in combat - would the best place to start be the records for the Vendome flying school? And does anybody know what a class G reserve is?

Many Thanks in advance

Gavin Mc

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Gavin

That's a rather difficult post to read!

Lt G H Carr was the observer in Armstrong Whitworth FK 8 E8830 of No 8 Sqn RAF, flown by Lt Glen, when they left Malincourt aerodrome at 1450 on 23 October 1918 on a Counter Attack Patrol. The airmen were involved in a fight with with enemy aircraft at 1455 and Lt Carr was wounded.

I hope that this helps

Gareth

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Hi Gareth

Yes you are right, I read it again and it is very badly put together, but thank you for picking your way through it and passing on the information.

Best Regards

Gavin

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