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Remembered Today:

Lengths of Service


Simonwpb
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My ancestor was called up from the reserves in 1914. I know his date of enlistment was 1902 from his SWB medal roll. I want to figure out what year he was released to the Active Reserve before the war.

I think a standard service commitment in 1902 was 7 years? Soldiers could extend it to 8 or 12 years.

My question is, if you served two years overseas in a Militia bttn, then signed up with a line regiment in 1902, did your prior service count towards your new commitment? This would determine if he stayed in uniform from 1907 to perhaps 1910.

[The particulars are 5401 Pve William Smith served from 1900-1902 in S. Africa with the 4th (Militia) Battalion, King's Own Stafford Rifles. After the unit returned and the militia dismissed to their homes, he enlisted a few months later in the KRRC as 4673 Pve Smith. According to the regimental chronicle, over 50% of the riflemen of 1/KRRC extended their commitment to 8 years in 1904]

P.S. books.google.com has been a great resource for digital books of regimental histories!

- Simon

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Hello Simon

The standard term of enlistment, from I think the 1870s, was twelve years, partly with the Colours and the rest with the Reserve. For the infantry, colour service was seven years, Reserve service therefore five. It differed in other arms, e.g. six and six in the artillery.

Previous Militia service would not count, as joining the Regular Army would be a fresh engagement.

At the end of twelve years the man could opt to extend his reserve service in Section D, for four years at a time.

There were opportunities for men to extend their Colour service beyond seven years if they were still considered fully efficient. This was mainly to ensure retention of NCOs and warrant officers.

The seven years' service could be extended (by the Army) by one year if the soldier was serving abroad. This was mainly to simplify sending time-expired men home during the "trooping season" when transport was more readily available.

Your man, who enlisted as a Regular in 1902, would transfer to the Reserve in 1909 or possibly 1910. In 1914 he would have been eligible to transfer to Section D, or indeed he may have re-enlisted afresh in the rush of volunteers in Aug/Sep 1914.

Ron

PS Have you posted this query twice?

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Hello Simon

Ron

PS Have you posted this query twice?

Ron,

Thanks for the info. My Internet connection or the server locked up as I made the post. When I hit the back button I think it posted the Q. a 2nd time.

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Hi my ggrandfather joined the army in 1902 and served to 1905. He was recalled in August 1914 and finally discharged in 1915. He served 13 years instead of 12 because of the outbreak of war.

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Previous Militia service would not count, as joining the Regular Army would be a fresh engagement.

Ron

I don't think that this is quite right for men in Militia units who served during the SA war. There is a section in the history of the KOYLI relating to this, but I do not have the exact wording on me at the moment . I believe that t goes along the lines of, every year that a militiaman spent serving abroad would count as 2 years regular service. For example, if a man served two years abroad with the militia then signed up for 12 years with the regulars he would only have to complete a further three years with the colours and 5 years with the reserve to be time served.

I will dig out the reference when I can get to my books.

Andy

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