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BRITISH STELL HELMET FINISH


GRANVILLE
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I would be very interested to know members views on the subject of paint finish to the British steel helmet. I would like to know if anyone has identified a modern paint shade with authenticly captures the original, accepting that were various shade differences. I've recent read John Terraine's work: General Jack's Diary, in which Brigadier-General J.L. Jack D.S.O. describes with pride that the troups under his command presented a fine sight in their: 'polished, bottle green helmets'. I'm also aware that specific camoflage schemes were devised & recognised. Having had involvement in bringing about the replica Wm Lennon boots, I'm now looking into the possibility of reproduction of the steel helmet, hopefully by one of the long established steel companys in Sheffield, from where a great many came in the first place. If anyone has any information/scans etc etc., they would be much appreciated. David

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Have you searched the forum? Lots and lots of Brodie discussions over the years, especially on page 2 of this link regarding finish:

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...%2Bbrodie+steel

Max,

Yes, I have spent some time looking at the subject, which actualy prompts this posting. In some respects I might have done better by asking living history members which finished would be preferred if a replica helmet becomes available. Clearly there were various shades & finishes, from shiney to textured. I would however be interested to know if anyone can say for sure if helmets were ever brush painted, in particular in the early stages, as opposed to a spray finish.

David

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Well, in one of the topics in the link above (on the second page as mentioned) Joe S. gives a run down of the colours and finishes:

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...hl=brodie+steel

And again here:

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...hl=brodie+steel

And here:

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...hl=brodie+steel

Hope this helps.

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Well, in one of the topics in the link above (on the second page as mentioned) Joe S. gives a run down of the colours and finishes:

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...hl=brodie+steel

And again here:

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...hl=brodie+steel

And here:

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...hl=brodie+steel

Hope this helps.

Max,

More than helpfull, and I appriciate you pointing these links out. I have to say I can't get the images to open, so if anyone who contributed last time wants to repost the scans, it would be good.

David

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I have here a site with a few informations , especaly about the apple green Helmet. Spanish only

http://www.cascoscoleccion.com/granbret/gbk116.htm

This is an excellent sourse of pictoral info; only wish I could read what it has to say......Many thanks.

David

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Try a web page translation with AltaVista Babel Fish. Should give you the gist of it.

I'm now satisfied you can achieve anything on the web!! Not sure the translation is any the clearer, but the discovery of this website facility is something every forum member should try out just for the fun of it. Top marks to Wardog.

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Hi Pals,

Slightly off topic but technically part of the "finish".

I was told that when the British helmets were originally issued there were often facial injuries inflicted on the next fellow caused by the sharp rims due to the differing heights of the soldiers when marching/parading in close order.

The solution was to put a protective cloth(?) around the rim.

Can anyone confirm this as fact? ;)

Regards to all,

Cliff

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Hi Pals,

Slightly off topic but technically part of the "finish".

I was told that when the British helmets were originally issued there were often facial injuries inflicted on the next fellow caused by the sharp rims due to the differing heights of the soldiers when marching/parading in close order.

The solution was to put a protective cloth(?) around the rim.

Can anyone confirm this as fact? ;)

Regards to all,

Cliff

Hello, Cliff - That is the reason that metal rims (not cloth) were added to the helmet. Regards, Torrey

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I would be very interested to know members views on the subject of paint finish to the British steel helmet. I would like to know if anyone has identified a modern paint shade with authenticly captures the original, accepting that were various shade differences. I've recent read John Terraine's work: General Jack's Diary, in which Brigadier-General J.L. Jack D.S.O. describes with pride that the troups under his command presented a fine sight in their: 'polished, bottle green helmets'. I'm also aware that specific camoflage schemes were devised & recognised. Having had involvement in bringing about the replica Wm Lennon boots, I'm now looking into the possibility of reproduction of the steel helmet, hopefully by one of the long established steel companys in Sheffield, from where a great many came in the first place. If anyone has any information/scans etc etc., they would be much appreciated. David

]David,

Having owned many Brodies and researched a fair bit, I think there must have been such a variety of colors, shades and finishes to the helmets on the western front.

Duck egg grey/blue, Apple green, black, all shades Brown through to olive etc. Shiney smooth to Heavy grit finish, repaints, replaced liners and re-issues,

hidden under a variety of canvas or hessian covers

Millions were manufactured, so take your pick, who can say.

I once refurbished a rusty old shell for a reenactor, I added a prairie flower liner and was quite pleased with the result.

I used Dulux 'Pebble Mosaic' 10YY08093 3C8 with a very small dash of Dulux 'Delhi Bazaar' 20YY09175 3V7

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