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Crosbie's Craters


snailybailey
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My Great Grandfather was KIA with the 11th Bttn LF on 16th May 1916 in an attack following the mining of an area which I believe became known as Crosbie's Craters (named after the Officer in charge I think).

Do any knowledgeable members out there have any more info on the Lancs Fusiliers attack at this time?

I also believe that the craters are still there but may not be visitable. Has anybody visited this area who may have pictures which they could share with me?

Regards

Glyn

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My Great Grandfather was KIA with the 11th Bttn LF on 16th May 1916 in an attack following the mining of an area which I believe became known as Crosbie's Craters (named after the Officer in charge I think).

Do any knowledgeable members out there have any more info on the Lancs Fusiliers attack at this time?

I also believe that the craters are still there but may not be visitable. Has anybody visited this area who may have pictures which they could share with me?

Regards

Glyn

Glyn

came across the following web site

http://www.webmatters.net/france/ww1_vimy_11.htm

Paul

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Glyn

Whilst at Vimy last November I learned that they were in the act of dismantling a multi-ton mine which had not detonated in 1917,so that might be another reason for not being allowed everywhere ! I can't remember the name of the Group doing it,but I think it began with a G,and they have a website showing their activities. I am sure someone here will add their name in no time !

Best wishes

Sotonmate

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I had heard of the Durand group - http://www.durandgroup.org.uk/ - but they don't begin with a "G"

Thanks to everyone for their info...very interesting!!

Still waiting for a picture or two hopefully!!

Regards

Glyn

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I briefly cover the firing of the Crosbie Group of craters in my Battleground Europe Vimy Ridge book (the old one. not the new one written with Jack Sheldon). The craters are probably to be found in (private and fenced off) ground up the track towards the memorial on the right hand side from Gohelle en Givenchy Canadian cemetery, best accessed from Souchez (whence it is signposted). You can walk down the above mentioned track from the Canadian Memorial end. but it wuld take you somewhat longer to do so. Although the track is driveable, it is very narrow, muddy and overhanging branches and vegetation would probably not do your paintwork much good.

Nigel Cave

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I briefly cover the firing of the Crosbie Group of craters in my Battleground Europe Vimy Ridge book (the old one. not the new one written with Jack Sheldon). The craters are probably to be found in (private and fenced off) ground up the track towards the memorial on the right hand side from Gohelle en Givenchy Canadian cemetery, best accessed from Souchez (whence it is signposted). You can walk down the above mentioned track from the Canadian Memorial end. but it wuld take you somewhat longer to do so. Although the track is driveable, it is very narrow, muddy and overhanging branches and vegetation would probably not do your paintwork much good.

Nigel Cave

Nigel

I quoted your book in a previous post on same subject this has been a double post as my reply doesn't feature on this post.

I read three of them yesterday whilst waiting for an operation

Vimy Ridge

Monchy le preux

Gavrelle

Excellent source and good reading, I will be using them on my visit next week

Regards

Paul :rolleyes:

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Delta

That would be it, G for Group ! Now you mention Durand I know it is right,thanks.

Sotonmate

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I briefly cover the firing of the Crosbie Group of craters in my Battleground Europe Vimy Ridge book (the old one. not the new one written with Jack Sheldon). The craters are probably to be found in (private and fenced off) ground up the track towards the memorial on the right hand side from Gohelle en Givenchy Canadian cemetery, best accessed from Souchez (whence it is signposted). You can walk down the above mentioned track from the Canadian Memorial end. but it wuld take you somewhat longer to do so. Although the track is driveable, it is very narrow, muddy and overhanging branches and vegetation would probably not do your paintwork much good.

Nigel Cave

Thanks for this Nigel...I'll certainly take a look at the book, and hope to visit there soon!

regards

Glyn

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  • 7 months later...
Guest glynmax@btinternet.com

Hi,

My grandfather was also in the 11th LFs and was wounded in action. I have only just discovered through trawling through the Darwen News fiche that his wounding was reported on June 3rd 1916. I always assumed that he saw action on the Somme so when I went to Kew to look through the war diary I didn't look closely enough at the pre July 1st pages. I am now assuming that he was wounded in May 1916 possibly in the action you describe. I have quite a bit of info on the 11th LFs including their location for everyday of the war. I intend to go to Kew again this year to look at the correct (this time!) part of the war Diary. Have you any other info on the 11th LFs.

Regards.

Glyn Jones

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