Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Is this an artillery uniform?


petersloan
 Share

Recommended Posts

Can anyone confirm that this uniform is Royal Field Artillery? If not then which unit? Any idea what the stripes or lanyard indicate?

post-26144-1192737213.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, but it looks like a Territorial variety as the lapel badges and shoulder titles differ from what would be considered "standard issue".

Roop

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is it possible it's a fusilier uniform? The shoulder titles might have a grenade between two letters, and those might be fusilier grenades on the collar, rather than an RA-type badge.

Odd to see collar dogs on an o.r., anyway.

Sorry to muddy the waters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The key here ,is the putees.

Wound downwards & tied at the bottom, in the Artillery, as they are here, rather than wound upwards & tied at the top, for the Infantry.

Not really sure why this was so, though. Anyone??

Possibly also the same for RE's(as this man could then be) & maybe some others as well. ASC, etc.

Mounted Regiments style? Something to do with the wearing of spurs?

Good conduct stripe on left sleeve & possibly 2 years overseas service stripes on right sleeve here also.

Cheers !

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Glad you mentioned Fusiliers Broomers, I did notice the collar dogs and the shoulder titles which didn't make me overly confident in saying Artillery but then the lanyard added to the confusion. Any chance of a zoom on the shoulder titles.

Rob

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello,

The white lanyard indicates a gunner. I seem to remember a claim that they were worn as a spare in case the lanyard on the firing lever failed.

Old Tom

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Fusilier it is. :closedeyes:

I think that's an "N", so Northumberland Fusiliers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello,

The white lanyard indicates a gunner. I seem to remember a claim that they were worn as a spare in case the lanyard on the firing lever failed.

Old Tom

Tom, I am not so sure that is the case. The lanyard usually indicates involvement with the transport section of a unit. I think it had a clasp knife on the end of it, with the usual blades for removing stones from boyscouts' hooves or some such!

(Added to his breeches) I also think that the puttee winding reflected mounted duties too, so possibly a driver with the transport section of his fusiliers batalion.

Ian

PS - maybe other pals would comment on his chevrons - good conduct/long service? He has stripes on both forearms of his jacket.

Shall I colour him? Yeh, go on - nothing better to do right now! Ian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a really nice picture: I don't think I've seen the old fuslier grenade from the plain 'NF' shoulder title with separate grenade used as a collar dog before. I wonder how common this was?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The shoulder title should confirm it as a Fusilier soldier. Lanyards were worn by lots of mounted soldiers for knives etc as has been mentioned. The puttees would indicate he had a mounted job in the Bn.

Alan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The key here ,is the putees.

Wound downwards & tied at the bottom, in the Artillery, as they are here, rather than wound upwards & tied at the top, for the Infantry.

Not really sure why this was so, though. Anyone??

Possibly also the same for RE's(as this man could then be) & maybe some others as well. ASC, etc.

Mounted Regiments style? Something to do with the wearing of spurs?

Good conduct stripe on left sleeve & possibly 2 years overseas service stripes on right sleeve here also.

Cheers !

Steve

Steve,

The reason I believe is that while sitting astride a horse, if puttees are wound from the bottom and tied off at the top they would unravel with the movement of the horse as the rider grips the horse with his legs.

So therefore they were tied off at the bottom to avoid this and was SOP for all mounted troops.

Regards,

C.T.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

C.T. ,

thanks for that info. All is now explained ! :)

I remember my Grandfather, a WW1 NZ Artilleryman, saying that they always wore their Puttees wound downwards instead of up,as the Infantry did. Had assumed,origionally this was peculiar to them, but have adjusted that idea now ,

to cover mounted personal, generally, as we see here.

Cheers !

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...