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CITADEL MILITARY HOSPITAL


rlndhorne
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Hi,

Does anyone have any information on the Citadel Military Hospital? Where, When, Who? Anything basically. Thankyou in anticipation.

Take Care.

It was a military hospital during the British occupation and was only returned to Egyptian control after World War II. Since 1949, it has been the Military Museum of Egypt (founded by King Faruq).

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It was a military hospital during the British occupation and was only returned to Egyptian control after World War II. Since 1949, it has been the Military Museum of Egypt (founded by King Faruq).

Thanks for that, I did try a web search, but couldn't quite pin-point what I was looking for, for certain. Take Care.

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At the time of the outbreak of the war, there were two permanent British Army hospitals in Egypt that at the Citadel in Cairo, and a smaller one at Ras-el-Tin, overlooking the harbour of Alexandria. These, however, were equipped only on a peace footing, with 250 and 120 beds respectively.

To the aid of the handful of Medical Service men staffing the two military hospitals at the Citadel, Cairo, and at Ras-el-Tin, near Alexandria, came first of all the three East Lancashire Field Ambulances, forming part of the 42nd (Territorial) Division which landed in Egypt towards the end of September, 1914. Then followed early in December the Indian troops destined primarily to guard the Suez Canal, accompanied by their field ambulances and two complete General Hospitals, which were stationed one at Cairo and one at Alexandria. The New Zealand Imperial Force with its field medical contingent arrived in Egypt about the same time, and towards the end of the year the First Division of the Australian Imperial Force reached Alexandria, bringing with it five complete units of the Australian Army Medical Corps fully equipped.

Meanwhile, in Cairo the permanent Military Hospital at the Citadel had its bed accommodation at doubled, the number of beds eventually reaching 775. No. 1 Australian General Hospital, which had been established in the Heliopolis Palace Hotel on January 25 with 200 beds, and had expanded to 1,000. With the influx of sick and wounded , additional buildings in the neighbourhood were pressed into the hospital service, until over 6,000 beds were available. The Egyptian Government lent its civilian hospitals in Kasr-el-Aini and the Army hospital at Pont de Koubbeh. The Saidieh Government School building was also handed over, and within a few weeks had been opened as a hospital by the Red Cross Society with a complement of 200 beds which was rapidly increased.

The Anglo-American Hospital immediately placed its wards at the disposal of the British Army Medical Service. Later, a hospital was opened at Choubra for infectious cases. No. 5 Canadian Stationary Hospital was established in the Cavalry Barracks at Abbassieh; and the Egyptian Government Primary School, known as Nasrieh School, became a British Military Hospital with 584 beds. In addition there was No. 5 Indian General Hospital at Alexandria, which was expanded to 950 beds; and by No. 8 Indian General Hospital, which was installed at the Citadel Bijou Palace, and contained beds to the number of 900.

Regards Mark

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My gt grandfather was stationed in Cairo in the second half of1917. His diary contains a few references to the Citadel. The first from June the last two from September:

'Had a good look around the Citadel at Cairo – saw “Joseph’s Wellâ€, the place where they shot condemned people, the site of massacre of Caliphs by Mahommed Ali &c &c. '

'Major Greenfield who was quartered there very kindly showed me over the Citadel – it’s a most curious old place when one can get “behind the scenes†& very interesting – it was built by Saladin. Although very imposing to look at, it is really in shocking repair.'

'Visited the Detention Barracks at the Citadel in my official capacity – extremely well run by an officer whose name I forget but who was very experienced in such matters.'

Another entry, also from September, mentions in passing “the Adjt of the Bn stationed at the Citadelâ€

There is no mention of any hospital there, which is strange as Mark has shown that it was clearly quite an important one. On the other hand, there is mention that the place also contained “detention barracks†and apparently a battalion stationed there !

There are however, references to what must be military hospitals. Certainly one in, I think, Cairo where an Italian officer died in August 1917 and whose funeral had to be organised. Otherwise there is mention of the hospital in Ismailia (where a Major Gardiner RFA died in June 1916). More interestingly there is an entry for late September 1917:

'Inspected El Hyatt (hotel) hospital at Helouan. Very nice hotel & Helouan is nicely situated on a height from which one sees across the Nile to Sakhara, it’s in the desert but easily accessible by rail or motor car from Cairo. It is a fashionable “cure†in peace time & has all sorts of electrical appliances for rheumatics, gout, &c.'

He also mentions that his batman got pleurisy in October 1917 and went to No 27 General Hospital – which I presume was in the Cairo area.

On campaign there are mentions of hospitals at Abd (Sinai) and Nasariyeh (Palestine). The last two entries I found are both for hospitals in or near Alexandria from just after the armistice, the first being the ‘Raaeltin hospital’ - obviously Mark's Ras el Tin. The last clearly another conversion.

'Went to tea at Montaza – a hospital formerly one of the Sultan’s palaces, a fine place in a big park on the sea in very picturesque surroundings,'

Hope this is of some interest or use. If anyone has any further details of these establishments I’d be very grateful as I’m working on this diary.

Julian

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I think you will find that the reference to "Citadel Hospital" MAY relate to DOVER in Kent!

It would help if you stated the context in which you seek information? Have you a man who was treated here? If so, when, what regiment or unit was he etc...... It might be possible to prove or disprove the Egypt thing if you can identify his unit, it's quite easy to find out where a unit served...

The Citadel Hospital was located on the Western Heights underneath The Citadel Army Camp. The 3rd and 9th Buffs (Special Reserve) training battalion's were based here throughout most of the Great War. A large number of New Army battalions (K1,K2,K3) were actually raised and formed at the Citadel in Dover (including some very obscure far away English and Scottish county infantry regiments). The hospital was huge and contained over 500 beds. Wounded and ill men were evacuated through the medical evacuation chain from the battlefields across the Straights of Dover to the Dover Marine Railway Station. From here they were sorted into high risk, medium risk and low risk. Men who were considered High Risk (unable to be moved a long distance in railway hospital trains) were taken to the Military Hospital on the Western Heights. I have seen many references to this hospital as the "Citadel Hospital".

The hospital was demolished in the 1960's. The Citadel itself is now used by H.M Prison Service / H.M Immigration Service as a Prison and Immigration Detention Holding Facility. Have a look at these links -

http://dover-western-heights.org/whps/military_hospital.htm

http://dover-kent.co.uk/defence/citadel_drop_redoubt.htm

http://www.ecastles.co.uk/wheights.html

http://www.ind.homeoffice.gov.uk/aboutus/i...alcentres/dover

And the meaning of a CITADEL - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citadel

This link shows how close the hospital was to the Citadel itself - http://www.dover-western-heights.org/whps/tour.htm

My Gt Grandfather was a Buffs Sergeant based in the Citadel during the Great War (former 2nd Buffs in South Africa Boer War), he lived in Dover most of his life.

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hhmmmm, I did wonder ! Rolande's initial enquiry followed by Birchp's off the cuff remark about being handed back to Eg control !!!!

Perhaps one of the two Citadel Hospitals ought to declare a breakaway independant thread.

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Looking back at Rolande's first post you could be right. I just assumed Egypt.

The large El Hayat Hotel at Helouan, had been converted into a convalescent depot.

The Palace, or rather group of mansions, at Montazah near Alexandria had been lent by the Sultan of Egypt and a convalescent depot created, where mainly Australian patients could be housed which alone took over a thousand patients.

I think Abd refers to Bir-el-Abd

Regards Mark

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Actually my G Grandfather was based in the Grand Shaft Barracks, Dover with the 3rd Battalion The Connaught Rangers in 1918.

Regards Mark

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Who cares... Let's discuss BOTH hospitals, we haven't proved which one yet...

Sounds good to me. I actually made the initial enquiry after receiving a reply on the topic of 'military Doctors of WW1' .... The Doctor (and now, Mrs/Sister) Ridewood thread.

But we've already seen some nice stuff regarding the Egypt hospital and I'm sure that we're going to see similar interesting posts with regards to the Dover hospital.

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There was a permanent hospital at Ismailia used for The Egyptian Labour Corps and the Camel Transport Corps

The Egyptian Labour Corps and the Camel Transport Corps had been placed under British commanders, with staffs of British officers.

Regards Mark

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  • 2 months later...

Interesting thread, and nice info', Neil.

I have never seen the hospital mentioned at the Citadel Hospital. To me it's always been the Royal Military Hospital.

There was a WWII mobile dressing station actually in the Citadel itself, although I don't know if this was the case during WWI.

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  • 6 years later...

I know this post was along time ago, but there was definately a General Hospital at The Citadel in Cairo, I have book about the Medical Services during the great war and it states that there was a military hospital there.

I also just found this website: http://sarahfairhurstjmm.wordpress.com/2014/01/06/the-diary-of-florence-oppenheimer/

And there is a comment and a picture, and from what I can see the picture is of the Hospital.

Florence also spent time working at a hospital in Port Said and at a Military hospital at The Citadel in Cairo from October 1915 until April 1916.

“The hospital was built for a palace about 100 years ago and has been used as Military hospital for 25 years, but in peace time there are 200 beds but now there are 1000. The Citadel is an ancient fortress built by Saladin in the 12th Century and the palace is built right up at the top.”

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