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Steve_McGarry

Ireland

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Steve_McGarry

As I am off to Ireland in late April or early May for a motor cycling holiday to the land of my ancestors. I was wondering if there are any WW1related (regimental etc) museums or memorials worth seeking out. I am going to be in the Athlone/Roscommon/Westport/Galway/Clare/Dublin area's not the north during my stay... But if a museum is slightly off this route I am sure the Triumph can do a detour.

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Andrew Marshall

I don't know of any Museums to British Regiments but when I visited the areas of Fermanagh, Galway and Clare in 1991 I found several memorials to those of the Irish Republican Army from the Anglo - Irish War of Independance and some for the Civil War after.

It may be that you will see more of this type of thing than British memorials, although others on the list may have further knowledge.

Regards

Andrew

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Theo

I have heard that there is a German War Graves cemetery in the Republic where U-boat men who were washed ashore are buried. Unfortunately, I don't know where it is but can find out for you if you're interested.

Theo

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Marco

I 'did' Ireland (Dublin - Waterford-Killkenny-Cork-Killarney-Limerick-Galway-Dublin + detours) last year and although I did some research I couldn't find much of military interest. The only notable thing being Fort George in Kinsale. Although nice it's not worth a long detour: 4 uniforms and some rifles. The fort itself is nice though.

All the good stuff is in Northern Ireland, which I did not visit. So be prepared for stunning nature, lot's of burned down churches etc, small castles which do banquets medieval style for Americans, many Americans, good whiskey, and not many women looking like the Corrs (which was a bit of a disappointment...).

Regards,

Marco

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CROONAERT

The German military cemetery in Ireland is at Glencree,roughly 15 miles south of Dublin(10 miles due west of Bray).It contains 6 First World War graves,and 128 from the Second World War,and was "commisioned" on 9/7/1961.

Dave.

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stephenh

There is a huge British military cemetery in Grangegorman, right beside the Phoenix Park which is probably no more than a mile or two from Dublin city centre. Martin Doyle VC is buried here.

Stephen

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Conor Dodd

There are a few casualties of the rebellion and other men who died at home in Deansgrange Cemetery just 5 minutes from Dun Laoghaire where the boat from Hollyhead comes in. Also there are some memorials on the way into town where the IRA where fighting etc. the German Cemetery is worth a visit very nice place. No regimental museums down in Bray there is the heritage centre with a first world war section somthing to do with the WFA. Also Grangegorman as Stephen said is well worth a visit.

Conor

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Conor Dodd

Sorry I forgot to mention the Bray War Memorial and Athy Heritage Centre (a bit on the Leinster Regiment and J.V. Holland VC)

Conor

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Mark Hone

As I mention elsewhere on the forum I can heartily recommend the outstanding Kilmainham Gaol museum in Dublin which contains much of World War One era interest, including weapons, equipment and memorabilia from the 1916 Easter Rising and the War of Independence which of course involved many ex-World War One combattants (on both sides!). Nearby is Edwin Lutyens' massive memorial to the 49,000 Irish dead of the Great War, only opened in 1939.

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Cliff. Hobson

Steve,

Can I presume on your good nature if you visit Grangegorman Military Cemetery and you have got your camera to take a photograph og the grave of Harold Rodgers 2nd/8th Sherwood Foresters for his Niece, his grave reference is CE.617, died 27th April 1916. will gladly meet the cost.

Cliff. Hobson.

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Conor Dodd

If you want when I get a chance I will do it for you its been a while since I have been out there anyway.

Conor :)

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Cliff. Hobson

Conor,

Thanks indeed for the kind offer.

Cliff Hobson.

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Mark Hone

If you are going near the Cork area it might be interesting to visit the forts in Cobh (formerly Queenstown) harbour. Queenstown was retained as a treaty port by the government until 1938. In the grounds of one of the forts, now an Irish military base, is buried the body of Major L.E. Compton-Smith from How Caple in Herefordshire. He was my great-uncle's battalion commander in 10th Royal Welch Fusiliers during the battle of the Somme. After the war he was posted to Ireland and kidnapped by the IRA in the grounds of Blarney Castle in 1921. He was held as a hostage against the release of IRA prisoners but when this did not happen he was shot. His body was later recovered from the bog in which the IRA buried it. His moving last letter, in which he forgives his captors, and the watch we he carried with him throughout the war, are preserved at the RWF museum in Caernarfon Castle. I visited the area a few years ago but was unable to gain access to the base. The letter was read out during a Parliamentary debate on Ireland and IRA leader General Mulcahy said that he wished to end the war so that they do not have to kill any more men like Major Compton-Smith.

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Guest woodyudet

http://indigo.ie/~1916/index.htm

There are details here about the easter rising walking tour in Dublin. This tour takes visitors around the major spots in the rising. I'm planning to go on this in July as research for my MA dissertation. I purchased the short paper back by the two guys who run the tour. Its fairly interesting guide to some of the major spots - especially Mount St. Bridge and the GPO.

I'll let you know what its like when i've done it ...

I think there's a museum in Collins Barracks, but Conor will no doubt be able to confirm this one way or the other...

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Conor Dodd
I think there's a museum in Collins Barracks, but Conor will no doubt be able to confirm this one way or the other...

Yes there is a museum in the Barracks can't really say how good it is as I have never been there (Amazing how you never go to things when they on your doorstep :huh: )

Conor

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Conor Dodd

Cliff,

I am droping down to the cemetery tomorrow morning so i will take that photo for you then if thats O.K.

Conor :D

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AOK4

I deleted my own post here after the post I was replying to disappeared. I just want to emphasize that this forum is no place for political discussions.

Regards,

Jan

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Conor Dodd

The photo of H. Rodgers grave.

Cheers

Conor :D

post-6-1059305859.gif

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Charles Fair

Ive only just seen this thread for the first time, so I guess this is too late for Steve's trip. However, here are a few things I found whilst in Ireland over Easter:

St Patricks Cathedral in Dublin (the protestant one) contains all the colours of the Irish regiments which were disbanded in 1922. It also has a number of individual, group (e.g. Boy Scouts, Boys Brigade) and unit memorials (South Irish Horse, Kings R Irish Hussars).

The Irish Nat War Memorial at Islandbridge has been renovated to its former glory in the past couple of years. A vast improvement over its near derelict state when I first visited nearly 10 years ago.

The Curragh. There is a military cemetery with WW1 CWGC graves about 1km from the camp. You can drive into the Camp itself, at least there wasnt anything to stop me at the time.

Cobh. Memorial to the sinking of the Lusitania on the quayside.

also Cobh Old Cemetery, about 1/2 a mile outside the town to the North contains many WW1 CWGC graves, incl some identified headstones of men who were on the ship. There are also three mass graves which contain most of those who died.

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Charles Fair

WW1 Memorial to the Boy Scouts of Dublin

post-6-1059413400.jpg

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reevemjr

The photographs are of memorials in or near Cork. One is of a Major Compton Smith's grave and was taken about 1924. I understand that he was died in 1921 and his body found in a bog and he was interred, his wife came out to his burial. About a week later his grave was damaged and had to be replaced.

The other memorial cross is also from the Cork area but I do not know where or what it commemorates.

Can anyone help with the story behind these photographs.

Sorry, I missed Mark Hone's post, but would still like any information or references to the events. So far I have only found some from New York newspapers.

Mike

post-46986-1245857049.jpg

post-46986-1245857077.jpg

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Sean.

Hi Mike,

You may have some of this information already but just in case.

Major G. L. Compton-Smith served with the Royal Welch Fusiliers in France during the First World War. He commanded 10th Royal Welch Fusiliers at the first battle for the Scarpe, 1917 and was twice wounded. He received the DSO and French Legion of Honour.

After the war he served with the 2nd Royal Welch Fusiliers in Ireland where in April 1921 while on his way to Blarney Castle he was taken hostage from the train and after being held hostage for some days he was shot in retaliation for the execution of 4 prisoners at Victoria Barracks, Cork (Now Collins Barracks). Before he was executed he wrote a letter to his wife which was placed inside his cigarette case and later given to his family, these items are at The Royal Welsh Fusiliers Regimental Museum.

Maj Compton-Smith’s body was buried in a nearby field and was not discovered until February or March 1926, the remains were taken to Collins Barracks where negotiations between his family and army command went on for some time before finally on March the 25 after the family (for some reason) turned down the opportunity to take the body back to England, Maj Compton-Smith’s remains were escorted to the quayside from Collins Barracks by a parade of non-commissioned officers where he was then taken by Navy launch to Fort Carlisle in Cork Harbor (now Fort Davis) and was buried with full military honours in the military cemetery near the fort.

I have some recent photos of the grave if you would like to see them, I don't recognise the cross at this stage but but i will check what i have.

Regards,

Sean

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Sean.

Hi Again,

I thought you might like to see this.

Its a brass wreath which was placed on the major's grave some years after the burial by his daughter Anne.

Regards,

Sean.

post-8617-1246048630.jpg

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reevemjr
Hi Mike,

You may have some of this information already but just in case.

Major G. L. Compton-Smith served with the Royal Welch Fusiliers in France during the First World War. He commanded 10th Royal Welch Fusiliers at the first battle for the Scarpe, 1917 and was twice wounded. He received the DSO and French Legion of Honour.

After the war he served with the 2nd Royal Welch Fusiliers in Ireland where in April 1921 while on his way to Blarney Castle he was taken hostage from the train and after being held hostage for some days he was shot in retaliation for the execution of 4 prisoners at Victoria Barracks, Cork (Now Collins Barracks). Before he was executed he wrote a letter to his wife which was placed inside his cigarette case and later given to his family, these items are at The Royal Welsh Fusiliers Regimental Museum.

Maj Compton-Smith's body was buried in a nearby field and was not discovered until February or March 1925, the remains were taken to Collins Barracks where negotiations between his family and army command went on for some time before finally on March the 25 after the family (for some reason) turned down the opportunity to take the body back to England, Maj Compton-Smith's remains were escorted to the quayside from Collins Barracks by a parade of non-commissioned officers where he was then taken by Navy launch to Fort Carlisle in Cork Harbor (now Fort Davis) and was buried with full military honours in the military cemetery near the fort.

I have some recent photos of the grave if you would like to see them, I don't recognise the cross at this stage but but i will check what i have.

Regards,

Sean

Sean

Thank you for this. My grandmother and grandfather were living at Trabolgan House at the time Compton-Smith's body was discovered and my grandmother always maintained he was discovered in a bog. However, that was her recollection, his discovery made quite an impression at the time as did the distruction of his grave. Especially as he had been such an honourable man. She was doubly concerned as my grandfather was at Fort Carlisle at the time Compton-Smith was found.

The correct dates and all the other information are a great help to me in placing the events in their correct place in my family history.

I suppose that there might be some reports in the Cork Examiner so I will have to explore that source.

I would like to see these photographs as if they differ from the one I posted we may be able to date mine more accurately.

Mike

post-46986-1246049209.jpg

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Sean.

Hi Mike,

If you send me your e-mail address to sean9@iolfree.ie I will send on the other photo that i have through e-mail, i also have some extracts form a book that was written about his death, its been a while since i read the book so your grandmother could be quite right in saying that his body was found in a bog, I also have the details of how his body was discovered.

Regards,

Sean

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