Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Sign in to follow this  
rflory

Royal Artillery Unit Histories

Recommended Posts

ianmccallum

Hi

I am new to the forum and I am not quite sure about jumping into discussions. I am trying to track down two Glasgow Celtic players who were conscripted into the RFA late 1917 or early 1918. One was 250576 Gnr Andrew McAtee he played his last game for Celtic on 13 April 1918 and disappeared until 18 January 1919. I have two newspaper clips which state he and the other Celtic player Joseph Dodds now in Khaki help Ayr United against Hearts (Edinburgh Team). The date of the newspaper clip was 27 April 1918. Joe Dodds was also in the RFA but I cannot find even a regimental number for him. The only reference to him is another newspaper clip which states Joe Dodds was in Royal Artillery team which played against Cameron Highlanders in France September 1918. Any suggestions would be gratefully received.

Ian McCallum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rflory

Gnr McAtte served overseas with the RFA and received the British War Medal and Victory Medal. There were eight men with the name "Joseph Dodds" who served in the Royal Artillery in the Great War so without a regimental number it would be very difficult to determine which one is him. Dick Flory

Hi

One was 250576 Gnr Andrew McAtee he played his last game for Celtic on 13 April 1918 and disappeared until 18 January 1919. I have two newspaper clips which state he and the other Celtic player Joseph Dodds now in Khaki help Ayr United against Hearts (Edinburgh Team). The date of the newspaper clip was 27 April 1918. Joe Dodds was also in the RFA but I cannot find even a regimental number for him.

Ian McCallum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ianmccallum

Hello Dick

Thank you for your reply. How would I go about finding out where and with what unit McAtee served while abroad. I guessed as much with Dodds. I think I will have to try a different angle with him. I see there was a Royal Artillery Journal,do you know if this was the same format as the infantry Regimental Magazines. Might it mention a football match between the Cameron Highlanders and the R.A. in September 1918. I think it was for the Army Cup, the Camerons were the Infantry Cup holders. The reason I ask is Dodds played in the game for the R.A. and his unit might get a mention i.e. team sheet. Thanks again for your time and advice.

Ian McCallum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rflory

Ian: As I indicated in a reply to a similar question by you on another topic, the Journal of the Royal Artillery was not like regimental journals of today, rather it was a professional journal for RA officers. The publication that covered athletic events, social activities, etc. of the RA was The Gunner, but that did not begin publication until 1920. Regards, Dick Flory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rflory

JPG: Unfortunately, there is nothing indicated between October 26, 1917 and 14 December 1917, so presumably it was a period of relative quiet.

Regards, Dick Flory

please check for "A" Bty. 84th Brigade for November 12 1917. Gunner Frank Ault died that day.

JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
John G

Thanks for checking on your records

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
andrew pugh

Good Evening All

I wonder If some one could tell me where the 88th Battery R.F.A were serving from the 23/8/1914.

And what type of guns served in this unit?Look forward to your replies.

Best Regards Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sheila

Hi Dick

I am trying to find out about a JOHN CORNELIUS ALBERT FARLEY, a driver with the 27th Battery RFA. He died 9th November 1914 age 24.

Any idea what he would be a driver of? any information at all you could tell me about him or where he would have been at the time of his death.

regards sheila

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pw643

Sheila

Your man was a Driver of horses which towed 18 pounder guns. Each driver controlled a pair of horses of which 6 towed each gun.

He was a member of 27th Battery, 32 Brigade , 4th Division

On his Medal Index Card he was registered as Killed In Action 09/11/1914 although I have no details of the particular action

of the Division on that day.

Regards

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rflory

27th Battery served in 32nd Brigade, RFA in the 4th Division. Farley was born and enlisted at Great Yarmouth and joined 27th Battery as a driver on 13 October 1914. I can find nothing in either the battery or brigade history indicating anything unusual happening on the day he died. Regards, Dick Flory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pipvh

This is probably a long shot, but is there any way to find a Forward Observation Officer on the first day of the Somme battle?

My grandfather is supposed to have been a forward observer on that day. His name was Gerald Birdwood Vaughan-Hughes, and the likeliest locations for him were Thiepval or Beaumont Hamel. I believe he was RHA at that point although he seems to have gone back and forth between the RHA and the RFA.

He survived the war (and the next one) but I could never have asked him anything like this - he loathed talking about the Great War. He went in in September 1914 and fought through to the Armistice - I believe that almost everyone he knew was killed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sheila

Thankyou Paul and Dick Flory for your informationon JOHN CORNELIUS ALBERT FARLEY.

regards Sheila

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tim finch

Hi there, you maybe my last hope! I've been trying to find out my Grandfathers actual unit. I know he was in the Royal Field Artillery, I know his service number was 70291, and that he was given a field promotion to Sgt. But i don't know which was his actual brigade.

I've gone through all the normal channels of enquires - but unfortunately his were amongst the records that were destroyed in WW2.

By process of elimination, I think he might have joined the West Lancs Brigade ( he was from Salford and I think he only served in France which would eliminate the East Lancs ) - but this is all "educated" guess work. I know when he got married in Aug 1915 his profession was listed as soldier.

Can you tell from his service number if he was in the West Lancs? His name was Percy George Service.

Many thanks in anticipation!

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pipvh
This is probably a long shot, but is there any way to find a Forward Observation Officer on the first day of the Somme battle?

My grandfather is supposed to have been a forward observer on that day. His name was Gerald Birdwood Vaughan-Hughes, and the likeliest locations for him were Thiepval or Beaumont Hamel. I believe he was RHA at that point although he seems to have gone back and forth between the RHA and the RFA.

He survived the war (and the next one) but I could never have asked him anything like this - he loathed talking about the Great War. He went in in September 1914 and fought through to the Armistice - I believe that almost everyone he knew was killed.

I've found the swagger stick with my grandfather's battles listed on it. They are:

Aisne

Vieux Berguin

Messines

Ypres '14

Lizerne

Ypres '15

Loos

Somme

Thiepval

Beaumont Hamel

Vieux Berguin

Asiago

Piave

The Rhine

So I'm guessing that on July 1st he was at Thiepval, and at Beaumont Hamel in November. He was gassed at some point (2nd Ypres?). I think, judging from the citation, that he won his MC at Vieux Berguin in April 1918. I'm sure I remember him talking about Passchaendale, and that he was in action in 1917, but nothing on the stick.

This isn't much to go on but it would fantastic if you were able to find anything at all about Lt Vaughan-Hughes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
janj

I've just been reading through the threads for this topic and wondered if anyone can help with further information on Driver Herbert Croxford RFA L/31563

Information on his service record shows his brigade as 177th (Fulham) and his unit as V/V HTMB and underneath it reads something like "at V Cmps HA".

Can anyone explain what the V/V means - from looking at previous replies I think HTMB means Heavy Trench Morter Bombs. Also any ideas on V Cmps HA?

Do any war diaries exist to shed any light on where he served, battles etc. I believe he was gassed at some point but survived the war and was demobilised in 1919 (transferred to class 7 or Z Army reserve 12th March 1919 - his birthday).

Jan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pipvh

Sorry to keep piling the info on like this! I've had a revelation about the swagger stick I'm basing Lt G B Vaughan-Hughes's movements on: it probably belonged to my great-grandfather instead - William H Kay, whom you very kindly helped me with on another thread, Dick.

So I haven't a clue what my grandfather was up to or what battery he belonged to, except that he was present at the Somme on July 1st and that he won the MC in 1918 (in March or April, I'm guessing). Sorry to have been waving an inadvertent red herring! Any info on Lt G Vaughan-Hughes will now be even more welcome...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
McNamaram

Mr rflory, I am told by Liverpool Annie that you are just the person to thake my query to the next and perhpa its conclusion.

What i had initially sought was details on my Great Uncle , which are now confirmed as

Name: Richard Thomas McNamara

Rank: Gunner

No: 238842

Reg: 410/96 Brg RFA ( I understand this to mean 96th Brigade, 410th Battery)

Date of Death: 14 October 1918

Location : France

Birth Place: Dublin

Residence: Dublin

However, i was interested in what where etc he was and thanks to Liverpool Annie, she found a link that indiacted that the 96/410th was with the Australian Corp! Why would this be and what would the impact be?

I am inteerested to understand the whats , whys and possible impact re: data this might have and could it be a link to finding his fathers records, whom aslo served in the army until 1901 and then again at some near the end, which continue to elude me!

PS

In case any body following this link has any ideas the brief details are:

Other than a letter i have that he wrote to his wife dated 23 November 1918 from Belgium, the only other information relates to some service that concluded in 1901 - This document is identified as an ‘Army form B. 2077’ which appears to be a discharge paper though it refers to a transfer to reserves.

On this document it states the following:

No: 67327 0r possibly 61321 though seven looks more probable

Name: Thomas McNamara

Reg: 20. (S. T) COY. SOUTH DIVN R.G.A nb. The DIVN is blotted so may be different bit the D is very clear.

Place: (assume of discharge) Fort Grange, Gosfort / Gosport?

Date May 18th 1901 or 1907?

I appreciate that this is not strictly the great war but I am curious as to whether hue would retain his number on rejoining or where else I might seek information.

Best regards

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
paul.pengelly

Hello,

I was hoping you might be able to help me......Five of my Grandads brothers fought in the First World War,One was living in America so he joined the C.E.F.

Of the other Four I have no information on (,until A****** gets to P ?) apart from the one who was killed, he was,

Cpl Sidney John Pengelly 4676 "D" Bty,75th Bde,Royal Field Artillery,died 5th June 1917,Buried Kandahar Farm Cemetery age 25.

Have I got it right ?,the 75th were part of the artillery support for the Guards Division.

Where abouts were they in early June and what was going on?

My father has been to the grave site and we do have a photo of it,but it would be nice to know something about his life.

We do have a photo that might be of him, "he" is wearing R.F.A/R.G.A,uniform,but as I dont know what regiments the other Pengellys served in,and there is at least one possible R.F.A man for each of their names!,it makes it hard to make a call either way.

Paul

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rflory

Marc wrote: "What i had initially sought was details on my Great Uncle , which are now confirmed as Name: Richard Thomas McNamara; Rank: Gunner; No: 238842;

Reg: 410/96 Brg RFA ( I understand this to mean 96th Brigade, 410th Battery). Date of Death: 14 October 1918"

96th Army Brigade, RFA went to the Western Front on 16 March 1918 and was composed of 407, 408, 409, 410 and 411 Batteries (all 18-pdrs.): It served under III Corps from 20 March 1918 to 27 April 1918 and 7 May 18 to 25 May 18; under the 31st French Corps from 27 Apr 18 to 28 Apr 18; under the Anzac Corps from 28 Apr 18 to 5 May 18 and 25 May 18 to 23 Jun 18; under II Corps from 24 Jun to 2 Jul 18; under 16th French Corps from 3 to 8 Jul 18; under X Corps from 8 Jul to 8 Sep 18; 3 Oct 18 to 7 Nov 18; and on 11 Nov 18; under XV Corps from 7 to 10 Nov 18.

My data indicates that 238842 Richard Thomas McNamara was born at Dublin and enlisted there and that he was killed in action.

You might be able to find something about his death in the war diary of 96th Army Brigade, RFA which for the period March 1918 to June 1919 can be found at The National Archives under WO95/295.

"Other than a letter i have that he wrote to his wife dated 23 November 1918 from Belgium"

I don't mean to doubt your information but don't understand how he could have dated the letter 23 Nov 18 when he was KIA on 14 Oct 18.

"Reg: 20. (S. T) COY. SOUTH DIVN R.G.A nb. The DIVN is blotted so may be different bit the D is very clear. Place: (assume of discharge) Fort Grange, Gosfort / Gosport? Date May 18th 1901 or 1907?"

The unit is 20th (Siege Train) Company, Southern Division, RGA at Gosport and the date has to be 1901, rather than 1907, as that designation was abandoned in 1902.

Regards, Dick Flory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rflory

Tim wrote:

I've been trying to find out my Grandfathers actual unit. I know he was in the Royal Field Artillery, I know his service number was 70291, and that he was given a field promotion to Sgt. But i don't know which was his actual brigade.

By process of elimination, I think he might have joined the West Lancs Brigade ( he was from Salford and I think he only served in France which would eliminate the East Lancs ) - but this is all "educated" guess work.

Can you tell from his service number if he was in the West Lancs? His name was Percy George Service.

Tim: Unfortunately the number you quote is a regular RFA number and not a territorial number so it does not appear that he would have been in the West Lancs Brigade as that is a Territorial Force unit and his if he had been a member of that unit his number should have been a six-digit number between 675000 and 700000. Regular numbers give no clue as to the unit in which the man served.

Regards, Dick Flory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rflory

Jan J wrote:

Driver Herbert Croxford RFA L/31563

Information on his service record shows his brigade as 177th (Fulham) and his unit as V/V HTMB and underneath it reads something like "at V Cmps HA".

Can anyone explain what the V/V means - from looking at previous replies I think HTMB means Heavy Trench Morter Bombs. Also any ideas on V Cmps HA?

177th Brigade, RFA served with the 16th (Irish) Division throughout the war. It served in Ireland and the UK until moving to France and Flanders in February 1916, serving there until the end of the war. The war diary for the brigade can be found at The National Archives under WO95/1962. It would appear that for at least part of his time on the Western Front that Dvr. Croxford served with Heavy Trench Mortar Batteries under V Corps Heavy Artillery.

Regards, Dick Flory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rflory

Paul requests info on

Cpl Sidney John Pengelly 4676 "D" Bty,75th Bde,Royal Field Artillery,died 5th June 1917
:

4676 Sidney John Pengelley, RFA was born on Old Kent Road, London SE and enlisted at Newport, Monmouthshire. He was killed in action on 5 June 1917. You may find something about him in the brigade war diary which can be found at The National Archives under WO95/4797.

Dick Flory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
McNamaram
Marc wrote: "What i had initially sought was details on my Great Uncle , which are now confirmed as Name: Richard Thomas McNamara; Rank: Gunner; No: 238842;

Reg: 410/96 Brg RFA ( I understand this to mean 96th Brigade, 410th Battery). Date of Death: 14 October 1918"

96th Army Brigade, RFA went to the Western Front on 16 March 1918 and was composed of 407, 408, 409, 410 and 411 Batteries (all 18-pdrs.): It served under III Corps from 20 March 1918 to 27 April 1918 and 7 May 18 to 25 May 18; under the 31st French Corps from 27 Apr 18 to 28 Apr 18; under the Anzac Corps from 28 Apr 18 to 5 May 18 and 25 May 18 to 23 Jun 18; under II Corps from 24 Jun to 2 Jul 18; under 16th French Corps from 3 to 8 Jul 18; under X Corps from 8 Jul to 8 Sep 18; 3 Oct 18 to 7 Nov 18; and on 11 Nov 18; under XV Corps from 7 to 10 Nov 18.

My data indicates that 238842 Richard Thomas McNamara was born at Dublin and enlisted there and that he was killed in action.

You might be able to find something about his death in the war diary of 96th Army Brigade, RFA which for the period March 1918 to June 1919 can be found at The National Archives under WO95/295.

Dick, Thank you for the information, and i shall make an opportunity to view the diaries in the coming weeks. Out of interest, why were batteries assigned to other nations corps?

"Other than a letter i have that he wrote to his wife dated 23 November 1918 from Belgium ".... I don't mean to doubt your information but don't understand how he could have dated the letter 23 Nov 18 when he was KIA on 14 Oct 18.

I apologise for the lack of clarity on this point. The letter in question was sent by the father of Richard. His (Thomas McNamara) letter was dated as 23 Nov 1918 with Belgium recorded in the header of the letter.

I am struggling to locate him in any databases - i do know that he survived the war and returned to Dublin. Given that he served up until 1901 with

20. (S. T) COY. SOUTH DIVN R.G.A , i thought that this data may have helped in providing some source for continuity , though as tme moves on it seems less likely.

Out of interest, where might i find out what and where the 20. (S. T) COY. SOUTH DIVN R.G.A were located prior to May 1901?a

Regards

Marc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tim finch
Tim wrote:

Tim: Unfortunately the number you quote is a regular RFA number and not a territorial number so it does not appear that he would have been in the West Lancs Brigade as that is a Territorial Force unit and his if he had been a member of that unit his number should have been a six-digit number between 675000 and 700000. Regular numbers give no clue as to the unit in which the man served.

Regards, Dick Flory

Dick,

many thanks for taking the time to reply. Is it likely that a soldier with a number close to his would be in the same unit or were they quite random? Plus any ideas which regular units were Lancashire ones?

Regards

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
janj
Jan J wrote:

177th Brigade, RFA served with the 16th (Irish) Division throughout the war. It served in Ireland and the UK until moving to France and Flanders in February 1916, serving there until the end of the war. The war diary for the brigade can be found at The National Archives under WO95/1962. It would appear that for at least part of his time on the Western Front that Dvr. Croxford served with Heavy Trench Mortar Batteries under V Corps Heavy Artillery.

Regards, Dick Flory

Dick, many thanks for this information particularly the reference to the war diary. On my next visit to TNA I will certainly look this up. Thanks again. Jan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...