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Sparky53

Dick

I see that you research RFA Officers.

While doing my research I came across mention of this chap's death in 109 RFA Brigade War Diary and thought you mightbe interested.

BUTCHER, HENRY TOWNSEND

Initials: H T

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Brevet Colonel

Regiment/Service: Royal Field Artillery

Unit Text: 108th Bde.

Age: 58

Date of Death: 20/09/1915

Additional information: Son of the late Maj-Gen. Arthur Butcher (Royal Marines) and Jane Butcher; husband of Annie S. Butcher, of 4, Stafford Mansions, Battersea Park, London. His son Arthur James Basil Butcher also fell in the 1914-1918 War and his son Trevor Aveling Butcher fell in the 1939-1945 War.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: VIII. K. 20.

Cemetery: DUD CORNER CEMETERY, LOOS

109 Brigade War Diary - WO 95/2198

1 September 1915

CONTES Detrained at CONTES at 11.30am having arrived at HAVRE from England on 31/8/1915.

9 September 1915 FLECHIN – bivouacked

10 September 1915 HURIONVILLE – Court martial assembled for Bombadier Cole B. A Column who was reduced to the ranks.

12 September 1915

VAUDRICOURT

NOUEX-LES-MINES - A Battery took over gun pits that had been prepared at PHILOSOPHE near VERMELLES. Several days are spent improving gun pits.

COL BUTCHER H.T. 108 BDE RFA killed by H.E. shell assisting civilians.

Jane

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rflory

Jane (Sparky53): Thank you very much for the information on Col H T Butcher. Every bit of information may at some time be useful. Regards. Dick Flory

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Woodsc
Colin: 786012 Dvr. W. Ellis of 312 Brigade was gazetted for the MM in the London Gazette of 11 May 1917 for an action on 6 April 1917 according to the "War Services of the 62nd Divisional Artillery." That book has the following information:

"On the 5th [of April 1917] our infantry went into the line, and I [Col. AT Anderson, CMG] took over the command of the artillery, which included in addition to my own brigade, the 7th DA, the 16th RHA Brigade, and an Anzac Brigade. That afternoon a mine exploded in Mory, killing one and wounding two of my men, and also wounding some artillery mules. In the evening a similar mine went off in Ervillers with distrastrous effect, killing five and wounding seven men of D/312. These mines, which we often met with later, were worked by corrosive acid, acting on a wire holding a spring hammer; when the acid had eaton through the wire, which might be within a period ranging from a few hours to several weeks, according to the relative strengths of the acid and the wire, the hammer struck a detonator, and the mine exploded; a typically Hunnish method of warfare.

For the next few days guns were actively employed in wire cutting, and the enemy responded by a vigorous shelling of teh valley. Capt. J. Willey and 14 men of B/310 were wounded on the 7th, and between the 6th and the 9th three other officers were hit, Major F. A. Arnold Forster, and Lieuts. P. K. B. Reynolds, and H. C. Ashby. Five Military Medals were awarded for gallant work on these days."

The five MMs that were awarded between the 5th and the 9th of April, 1917, were to 786049 Gunner E Leaf, 312nd Bde, RFA, 786012 Driver W Ellis, 312nd Bde, RFA, 4317 Dvr G Smart, 310th Bde, RFA, and 14383 Gnr J S Cooper, 310th Bde, RFA, all for an action on 6 April 1917; and 785652 Dvr G Wheatly, 312nd Bde, RFA for an action on 9 April 1917.

Regards. Dick Flory

Hi Dick

You are an absolute star !!!!! ~ a wonderful piece of information ~ which is really appreciated

Thanks once again for all your hard work

Regards...Colin

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campaign

Good evening Dick

I must admit to feeling a meas.........I am, I confess, the impatient type.

All of which is to say, if you could look up in your D Battery, 245 Bde RFA and see if there is any mention of a Driver Thomas Dodd........

Hi Colin - have you got all the other searches done already re medals etc, there are a few T Dodds on the list e.g.

Description

Medal card of Dodd, Thomas A

Corps Regiment No Rank

Royal Field Artillery 880573 Driver

Date 1914-1920

Catalogue reference WO 372/6links to the Catalogue

Dept Records created or inherited by the War Office, Armed Forces, Judge Advocate General, and related bodies

Series War Office: Service Medal and Award Rolls Index, First World War

Piece Denham W - Everitt H

Image contains 1 medal card of many for this collection

:-)

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brown8348@fsmail.net

Hi,

If time permits and you are able to, would it be possible if you could look up some info.

I have found my Great Grandfather Thomas O`Neill medal index card. On this it has him listed as Corps.. RFA...Rank ...Gunner..Reg No. 3140 and then under that RFA...771349.

In the 1919/1920 absent voters register it has him listed as RFA 53rd Fire Brigade 771349 as a boiler fitter.

Any info would be great.

thanks

Chris

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egbert
Dick , any information -even if only little - is appreciated on:

XV Brigade RFA with 52, 80, A/XV, D/XV (heavy), and on

XXVII Brigade RFA with 119,120,121, 37 (heavy) batteries

all for May 1st 1918, from around noon til 17:00

Any chance for a negative or positive answer please?

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harkerr@btinternet.com

Hi Dick

I see you are lucky enough to own " War Services of the 62nd West Riding Division Artillery", which I have only recently discovered exists.

I am researching my Grandfather who served in the 62nd DAC, therefore I am interested in any reference to the DAC within the book, However (I hope) they will be mentioned so often I cannot ask you to transcribe all entries for me.

Rather I was hoping you could point me in the right direction to get hold of a copy or even view one in a library?

I have asked my local library to search for one even outside their own area but have had no response yet. Have also tried Amazon and allthough they have the book details they have none to offer.

Any suggestions appreciated.

Very impressive collection by the way.

Thanks

Richard

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egbert
Any chance for a negative or positive answer please?

What actually does no answer so farmean please - can I still hope for clues?

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rflory

Egbert wrote: " any information -even if only little - is appreciated on: XV Brigade RFA with 52, 80, A/XV, D/XV (heavy), and on XXVII Brigade RFA with 119,120,121, 37 (heavy) batteries

all for May 1st 1918, from around noon til 17:00"

Egbert: Unfortunately the only information I have on those brigades is from the "Narrative of the 5th Divisional Artillery, 1914-18" and the only information given for the period around 1 May 1918 is that the Divisional Artillery (including both the 15th and 27th Brigades) were in position on the eastern edge of the Forest de Nieppe from mid-April to 6th August. The history further indicateds that during this period "positions were consolidated, and trench warfare resumed. Defence schemes, minor raids and attacks were carried out, of which the only one which calls for any remarks, is that carried out on 28th June."

Sorry I could not be of more assistance. You might want to check the war diaries of the two brigades for that period at the National Archives. The war diary for 15th Brigade, RFA for the period April 1918 through March 1919 can be found at WO95/1528 and the war diary for 27th Brigade, RFA for the period April 1918 through March 1919 can be found at WO95/1531.

Regards. Dick Flory

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Carr6

Hi There rflory!

You mentioned that you had information on 16 Brigade CFA from the NREF? I was wondering if you could look up Capt Oliver Alexander Mowat, or just Capt O.A. Mowat as he was most likely called just by his initials. He was Captain of 68 Bty during that time. He will not have a regimental number as he was an officer when he enlisted. Canada did not issue officers with regimental numbers.

I hope you still have that info kicking around, as I notice this post is rather old.

Thanks

Carrie

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rflory

Carrie wrote:

You mentioned that you had information on 16 Brigade CFA from the NREF? I was wondering if you could look up Capt Oliver Alexander Mowat,

Carrie: Here is what is in the history of 16th Brigade, CFA:

Page 36:

“From October 23rd, the date of the arrival in Shankhursk of three subsections of the battery under Capt. O. A. Mowat, until the middle of January was a period of little or no activity on either the Bolo side or our own.”

Page 38:

“While this operation at Ust Padenga was developing an attempt was also being made by the enemy to pierce the Shankhursk defences from a northwest direction through Tarnia and Nicolovskaya and with a view to frustrating this attempt, Capt Mowat had taken a gun to Nicolovskaya. This gun was in position on January 21st, but was not called upon to fire and on the afternoon of January 23rd, upon relief at Nicolovskaya by a newly arrived subsection on 1st Battery Russian Light Artillery, he proceeded south to Spaskoe so as to be able to cover the withdrawal of the Ust Padenga Force from that town. He reached Spaskoe at 6.30pm, established communication with Shankhursk at once an put his gun in action in a position which permitted an arc of fire of 360 degrees.

The enemy had followed up our retirement far more quickly than was expected, and at ten o’clock on the morning of the 24th, he launched about seven hundred men supported by two 4.1 howitzers and three 3” guns against our positions. . . From the outset the enemy directed his artillery fire almost solely on to Capt. Mowat’s gun, and it was no surprise to those of us who were forced to be mere spectators at Shankhurst to hear at 11 o’clock of the death of Shoeing Smith Cpl. Worthington, and of the fact that Capt Mowat, Bdr. Lawrence and Capt. Odjat, O.C. of the Garrison, had been wounded.

Capt Mowat had been admitted to Hospital immediately on arrival at Spaskoe and had been operated on successfully. When I saw him in the evening he was resting apparently comfortably.

Mowat later died of his wounds.

And I would mention additionally that Capt. Oliver Alexander Mowat, 68th Bty, CFA received the MC in the London Gazette of 27 May 1919 “for conspicuous gallantry and resource on December 15, 1918, at Kodema, when in charge of the operations, in addition to being in charge of an 18-pounder. He brought artillery fire to bear on the village at a range of 800 yards, under heavy rifle and machine-gun fire with marked success. He had previously done good work.”

He was also mentioned in despatches in the London Gazette of 15 Jun 1916.

Dick Flory

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SFayers

Hi Dick,

I see from your list you have "London Gunners (309 (Hon Arty Co) Siege Battery, RGA)".

If and when you have time, could you please check for me what 309 S Bty were up to between 19th - 22nd December 1917?

Many thanks

Steve

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rflory

Steve wrote:

f and when you have time, could you please check for me what 309 S Bty were up to between 19th - 22nd December 1917?

On 19 to 21 December 1917 the battery was located SE of Hannixbeek Farm, just east of the Langemarck-St. Julien Road and south of the Lekkeboterbeek where they had constant duels with a German battery. On 21 December 1917 the battery withdrew from the position handing it over to the 5th Siege Battery, RGA. The battery for the next week was at or near Turco.

Regards. Dick Flory

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johnreed

Steve

Please find attached map to help you.

John

post-1365-1197639496.jpg

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SFayers

Thankyou Dick for the information, and thankyou John for the map!

Your info nicely confirms what I have from 5 S Bty's War Diary. At the time 5 S Bty were based a little to the south at The Cockcroft, and apparently they took over 2 guns belonging to 309 S Bty "at U29d9637, near the LEKKERBOTERBEEK, about 300x north of the COCKCROFT" on 21st December. I wondered why 309 S Bty had left 2 of their guns behind - maybe ground conditions meant they couldn't be moved?

cheers

Steve

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egbert
......... You might want to check the war diaries of the two brigades for that period at the National Archives. The war diary for 15th Brigade, RFA for the period April 1918 through March 1919 can be found at WO95/1528 and the war diary for 27th Brigade, RFA for the period April 1918 through March 1919 can be found at WO95/1531.

Regards. Dick Flory

Thanks for your answer; unfortunately i have no chance to go to England to the archives. Maybe somebody could help me when in Kew?

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leslob

I am trying to find information on brother George and Francis Nicholls, from Monmouthshire. In the MICs there is a George no. 259149 and there is a Francis no. 259142, both RFA, and the proximity of the numbers suggest they might be 2 who signed up together.

I know that they served in Italy,together, and never saw action.

Is it possible to get an idea of which unit they served with?

Cheers,

Dave

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rflory

Dave: They may have belonged to the same unit but there is just not enough information to guess their unit. Dick Flory

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brownegaz

Hi Dick

When time permits I would appreciate it if you would be able to let me know where B Battery 302 Brigade may have been serving on 30 August 1916 and where A Battery 300 Brigade were in November 1916.

I really appreciate the time it must take you to do all these look up requests

Thanks for any assistance.

Gary

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brownegaz

Hello Again Dick

I just thought I would add that a friend has had a look at the war diaries at Kew for me and the only thing she found was that they were "in the field" with no mention of where, I dont know if you are able to add to this I would be very greatful if you are.

Thanks

Gary

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rflory

Gary: I can tell you that 302nd Brigade, RFA was opposite the southern end of Vimy Ridge for three and a half months beginning on 14 July 1916. I don't have anything on 300th Brigade, RFA on 300th Brigade, RFA. Regards. Dick Flory

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finkill

Re - 20th divisional artillery - is it possible to confirm or not that 93rd Brigade was part of it. I have seen different orders of battle which list 93rd and some which do not.

thanks in anticipation

peter

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Taffnp

I would appreciate if anyone has any details of the following :

Sgt Ernest Martin 13311 B Bat 130 Bde 28th Division.

He joined in August 1914

post-22527-1204119608.jpg

He would have completed his basic training and joined them in France. He would have seen action at Loos and then went to the Dardanelles.

He survived the war.

Aubery Martin 19983 B Bat 74 Bde Guards Division (Brother of above)

Joined 07th Sep 1914 at Newport and posted to No2 Depot (Fulwood barracks) Preston

post-22527-1204120023.jpg

Would have also seen action at Loos and then continued in major battles with the guards.

He survived the war but died aged 30 of acute Leukemia.

I have been able to find the formations and orders of battle, but I was hoping someone may have specific details on their respective batteries.

Thanks

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rflory

Peter wrote:

Re - 20th divisional artillery - is it possible to confirm or not that 93rd Brigade was part of it. I have seen different orders of battle which list 93rd and some which do not.

Peter: 93rd Brigade RFA was one of the original 1914 Brigades in the 20th (Light) Divisional Artillery. At that time it was made-up of three six-gun batteries: 289, 290, and 291. On 15 Jan 1915 the brigade was reorganized into four batteries with four guns each designated as A, B, C, and D Batteries. On 8 Jan 1917, 93rd Brigade, RFA left the 20th (Light) Divisional Artillery and became the 93rd Army Brigade, RFA.

Regards. Dick Flory

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finkill

thanks for your time Dick. I thnk I have mixed up the artillery I was really trying to locate the movements of my grandfather who served with 232 Siege Battery from July 1917 until Sept 1918 when I believe he was wounded. I think the 232 were part of the 93rd Brigade RGA and I got them confused with the RFA

regards

Peter

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