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Remembered Today:

Giacomo Franchitti (very long shot)


dorrie
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I was talking to a friend today who told me her Great grandfather served with the Notts and Derbys and his name was Giacomo Franchitti. I cannot find his MIC. I know it is a long shot but have any Notts and Derby enthusiasts coem across this name.

Cheers

Tim

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There are two Franchittis in the medals index, neither a Giacomo. Guistino served in RFA and Antonino in the Ceshires, Manchesters and Devons.

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Tim,

Is his name spelt right?

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The spelling is how I was told to spell it, but at the same time my friend said it could have been spelt Franchetti

tim

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The spelling is how I was told to spell it, but at the same time my friend said it could have been spelt Franchetti

tim

Tim,

Still no joy the only Franchetti is

Private 143416 Vincent K Franchetti, Royal Army Medical Corps, and the only Giacomo was Private GS/87435 Giacomo Cinato, Royal Fusiliers

Jon

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  • 9 years later...

Giacomo Antonio Franchitti.JPG

This is Giacomo - Sherwood Foresters, Notts and Derby, during WW1

- interned as an enemy alien in 1940,

died from 'shock' (stress) after the Arandora Star sinking and awaiting deportation to the Isle of Man, leaving a poorly wife and 4 children.

 

His father had brought Italian Ice Cream to Retford, selling it on the Market from 1920s (maybe before the war) until the 1950s.

 

His Grandson Michael still works Retford Market into 2017 - albeit in the different business of gold and Jewellery.

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  • 1 year later...

 

Update

Michael Bradley his grandson died before I could check this out RIP.

 

- 2 little options: they don't really work with John 6640 looking up options already, but I found another grave which I think is his - it is of

'Jack', loving husband of Norah Franchetti (sic - with an e) died 16th June 1940 aged 54.  This means b. 1886 meaning 28 in 1914.

 

Also family story of him dying of shock at being interned does fit the 'collar the lot' date of arrests as 10th/11th June.

 

It's 30 yards from main family grave which says  Teresa Franchitti (sic with an i) wife of 'Giacomantonio'.

Jack has to be Giacomo but my original notes from story give his name as Giacomo Antonio Franchitti.

 

Mystery - that is a Foresters cap badge isn't it?

 

Kevin BroBernard

 

 

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  • 2 years later...

Brobernard - that is his grave. He is buried with his second wife Norah. He did not die when interned or awaiting internment - I have no idea where that story came from. He was an ex Italian-British soldier (a friendly); his family were completely integrated - his daughter was married to a British soldier; his son (Alfonso) was in the RAF as a rear gunner (Alf Franks) and later became a comando. Authorities (I don't know who) intervened because of Jack's situation and history, and spoke up on his behalf, which meant he wasn't interred. I think he was quite ill at that point anyway. He died of lung cancer not of shock from the Arandora Star, which was sunk after he died. His daughter Maria (later Mary Bradley) was buried with his first wife (and her mother) Teresa (nee Henry). Michael his grandson is buried next to them. Also in the cemetery are Jack's parents and father in law (Teresa's dad). The issue is that they changed the spelling of Franchitti to Franchetti because English people were mispronouncing it. They later shortened it to Franks. It's possible he called himself something far more English such as Jack Franks, for example. But yes he served in Notts and Derbys and that photo is definitely him. Ignore the Giacomantonio it is a red herring - it is a contraction of Giacomo and Antonio - either because of a mistake (it's run on when said in Italian) or to fit it all on to the cross (lack of space) or maybe money if they paid by the letter... From what I can gather he joined up in the local Notts regiment in WWI because Italy and UK were fighting on the same side and he couldn't have got back to Italy to fight, so likely joined up 1915ish? Hope that helps.

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