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asanewt

Will, was your great uncle a footballer? You may have seen a post of 16th RWF Cup Winners, '14-'15. Jules

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m0rris

Jules

Not that I'm aware of - but I will certainly seek out your post as I'm interested in all things 16th RWF.

Will

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asanewt

Just in case your Taids's brother is here.

post-40034-0-17393200-1379016442_thumb.j

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m0rris

Thanks Jules - I don't think he's there, but they must have been comrades which makes it an interesting piece in an ever growing puzzle.

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Mrmerv31

Hi there,my great uncle was a Leeds lad but moved to Ystradgynlais when he was about 11,his name was Harry bickerdike Furness,he was killed at mametz wood on the 10th July whilst serving with the Swansea pals.All the family still live in farnley in Leeds and could never understand why his name wasn't on the cenotaph,on doing a bit of research I found his name on the Ystradgynlais memorial,does any one know where I can find out abit more about his service or how he died?

Any help would be greatly appreciated

Gary

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Bernard_Lewis

He's only mentioned in my book in the original list of men who went overseas in December 1915. He's listed as H.P. Furness, mother is Mrs M.J. Furness living at Mount Pleasant, Swansea which is actually very vague. Lots of roads on that hill...

The 10 July 1916 was the day that the Welsh Division (including the Swansea Pals, the 14th Welsh) made a major attack on Mametz Wood. A couple of earlier, smaller scale attacks had failed. Three days of heavy fighting and 4,000 casualties later and the Germans were pushed out of the wood.

No detail on how he died but obviously either on his way to the wood or while fighting inside it.

Bernard

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David Ridgus

Remembering the lads of the 38th (Welsh) Division as they waited in the darkness opposite the dark mass of Mametz Wood on the night of 9 July 1916. They sang in Welsh to relieve the tension of a long night...

Twenty years later an officer of the Swansea Battalion commented that during the war the Swansea Battalion had done a great many things - but, he added, the hardest thing it ever did was attack Mametz Wood.

The battalion was never the same after that and the town of Swansea observed the 10 July as 'Mametz Memorial Day' until the outbreak of World War Two. The Old Comrades of the battalion posted an 'In Memoriam' notice in the local press until 1966, at which time there only a few left.

Not forgotten...

Bernard

Bernard

Recently I had an exchange of views on another thread about the value or otherwise of empathy in the teaching of history. I think in retrospect I should have simply suggested that this classic thread be read from beginning to end as I have done this evening.

The thread really is a perfect storm of patriotism, pride, knowledge, erudition and, yes, empathy. It manages to wear its (immense) learning lightly and be moving without being maudlin.

I think many of the early posts in particular manage to bring out the almost mythic quality of the action at Mametz Wood and its place in Welsh history. I think in my case just about everything I know about Mametz comes from what might be called the literary sources: Llewelyn Wyn Griffith, David Jones, Graves, Sassoon (how could one regiment have so many literary giants?). As a consequence perhaps I have a rather more heightened emotional view of it than befits a history teacher and which makes me more susceptible to the emotional pull of so many of these posts.

Well whatever the reason, and with no apology for my response, it was a pleasure and a privilege. Thank you

David

PS I thought I'd better finally back up my knowledge with some 'proper' history of the period so have ordered your book!

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Bernard_Lewis

David - I, and I`m sure all the contributors to this thread thank you for your kind remarks.

Enjoy the book!

Bernard

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Stoppage Drill

This doesn't add to the discussion one bit, but memories, memories . . . . .

In 1967 I was invited to the 53rd anniversary reunion lunch of the (?) Bn, RWF, The London Welsh, in rooms on Northumberland Avenue. It was a courtesy invitation really, a thank you for a bit of help given by my branch, "You'd better go, Drill, you're interested."

"Right, sir."

My fortunes meant that I did this sort of thing several times over many years (Yangtze River Gunboatmens Association, for example anyone ?) but now, looking back, I feel a vicarious pride in having had the opportunity of sitting and talking with many brave men, including those veterans of the London Welsh who had been at Mametz.

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Steven Broomfield

15th Battalion, I think.

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Stoppage Drill

I'm always amazed at the things you know.

I'm sure I have the programme/menu card somewhere, with a cartoon of a helmeted Tommy looking back over his shoulder and giving a smile and a wink, and (of course) showing The Flash.

Cartoon apart, did RWF generally wear The Flash in SD in WW1 ?

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David Ridgus

I'm always amazed at the things you know.

I'm sure I have the programme/menu card somewhere, with a cartoon of a helmeted Tommy looking back over his shoulder and giving a smile and a wink, and (of course) showing The Flash.

Cartoon apart, did RWF generally wear The Flash in SD in WW1 ?

post-66715-0-91129000-1388267768_thumb.j

The caption to this photo said that senior officers thought they should not wear the flash. The response from the RWF was that as the enemy would never see it what was the problem.

David

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Bernard_Lewis

Phew SD. You could have got a few stories there!

Bernard

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Pontster

Afternoon all, I have recently grown more interest in and am beginning to look for details of relatives who fought in WW1.

I have 2 that I know of at the moment and know more about one than the other.

My Great Grandfather, Pte. 18459 William Thomas who we believe was in the 13th Btn. (2nd Rhondda) RWF and apparently died in Mametz on the 10/07/1916. I haven't been able to find any further information about him so far.

My Great Great Uncle, Sidney Chatham, Sergeant, 18801, Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Sidney was born at Llanelli in December 1888. He enlisted at Neath into the 14th Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, which was attached to 113 Brigade, 38th (Welsh) Division. On 21 August 1918 the Division launched its assault across the River Ancre, and over the coming weeks drove the Germans back to the Hindenburg Line, before heading towards Le Cateau and the Forest of Mormal. Sidney was killed in action here, during the Battle of the Selle, on 20 October 1918. He was 29 years old, and is commemorated on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial, France.

If anyone can help point me in the right direct or has anymore information about either I would be very great-full.

Cheers

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Ellis1918

Welcome to the Forum

Your post will be lost in this section.

Try reposting it under "Soldiers" as 2 seperate posts

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Pontster

Ok will do, cheers

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Watchdog8891

Hello all,

I have been asked by my village in Wiltshire to look into the names on our WW1 memorial, I have a Major Edwardes, G D'ARCY from the 1st (Royal) Dragoons who died on 10/07/16 and is buried at Dantzig Alley, Mametz. On the burial records I noted that he was attached to the 13\Welsh, I dont know much about the battles of WW1, but can anyone help me out, why would a Cavalry Officer been attached to a infantry regiment, would this have been a casualty replacement, reading through the above threads about Mametz Woods, i can see that Mametz was bloody battle, has one come across a Major Edwardes, G D'ARCY, as I would be very intrested to find out what company he was attached to etc,.

Best Regards

Nick

Ex HM Forces(Army) 1985-2008

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clive_hughes

Marden's history of the Welch Regiment has George D'Arcy Edwardes, though a Major, also described as Lieutenant-Colonel commanding the 13th (2nd Rhondda) Battalion during the attack on the Wood on the morning of 10th July. Another Major, Bond, was his 2nd in command. Both were killed: Edwardes in the opening attack on the Wood while he was trying to organise action against a machine-gun located in the "Hammerhead" feature.

His medal index card shows he landed in France on 8 October 1914 as a Lieutenant, and he earned the 1914 Star and bar as well as the War and Victory medals. He became a Captain, and his highest rank shown on the card is Temporary Major, 13th Welsh. His medals were applied for in 1921-22 by Mrs George Edwardes, 11 Park Square West, London NW.

The Probate records show firstly that a George Edwardes of 11 Park Square West, Regents Park, Middlesex died on 4 October 1915, the estate being valued at over £54,000, and probate granted to a theatrical manager named Everett (I'm assuming the deceased to be Major Edwardes' father). Then that George D'Arcy Edwardes of the same address, Captain (Temporary Major) in HM's Army died on 10 July 1916 in France. Probate was granted in his case to Cuthbert Arthur Sherbrooke, officer in the Army and his wife Dorothy Julia Gwynne Sherbrooke; and an Edwin Joseph Briggs, secretary. His estate was valued at £35,346.

Clive

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Watchdog8891

Clive,

Thanks for that, I did find a mention of his Death in a Newspaper called the Tablet http://archive.thetablet.co.uk/article/5th-august-1916/20/et-cietera-captain-darcy-wentworth-reeve-of-the-fl its about halfway down the article.

Major George D'Arcy Edwardes, reported missing, believed killed, from 9th July, was the only son of the late Mr. George Edwardes, and of Mrs. Edwardes, of Winkfield Lodge, Windsor Forest ; and was born in 1888. He was promoted captain in the 1st Royal Dragoons two years ago, and was attached to a Service Battalion of the Welsh Regt. as major and second in command in November, 1915.

Where would I find out why he joined 13th Welsh instead of a Calvary unit, any ideas?

regards

Nick

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clive_hughes

There might be something in his file at the National Archives (link given in your other post on this topic), but probably it was down to the availability of experienced Regular officers. Many older, reserve or recalled officers had raised and initially commanded New Army battalions/brigades and this was true of the Welsh Army Corps to which 13th Welsh Regt. belonged. Equally true was that when the units were ready for overseas service, these "dug-outs" were often removed and serving Regulars replaced them. e.g., the experienced L.A.E.Price-Davies VC of the KRRC replaced Brig.-Gen. Owen Thomas in command of 113th Brigade.

Many officers requested extra-regimental attachments, either because they were bored/unhappy with their current situation, or saw it as a plus on their post-war CV. Being known as a capable CO of an infantry battalion would have done Edwardes' Regular career no harm at all, had he survived; but remaining stuck in the cavalry as a junior officer in such a war was to be rather sidelined. Lots of officers re-trained as pilots and observers attached to the Royal Flying Corps for similar reasons.

Clive

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Watchdog8891

Hi Clive,

Many thanks for the above, I have a few more mystery's to wade through, I appear to have another Pte Soldier with 3 Regimental Numbers !

Regards

Nick

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Bernard_Lewis

Forumite Geraint was looking for this so I've dug it out...

Bernard

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geraint

Ta Bernard. Its a brilliant thread - well worth dipping into time after time!

:thumbsup:

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Guest

Dear All,

 

Last night I found myself looking over old family photographs, and one in particular - which depicted my G/Grandfather,

William Patrick Eddy which was taken in Rhyl 1915. He was a Sergeant in the 114th Brigade/38th Division I believe?

The original photograph is mounted and printed below it, the details and date which as I recall said -

Sergeants and Officers of the 10th Battalion Rhyl 1915. The photograph is approx A3 size - I've enclosed a portion of it here which shows my G/Grandfather at the back of the line up.

Sadly I do not have his service number, or any other information but for this photograph.

I will look out the original photograph amid other such photographs and include it in its entirety at some point soon if it

should be of interest to anyone? 

 

Oll an gwella,

 

Davey Eddy

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

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Bernard_Lewis

Nice photo. Did he survive the war?

 

Bernard

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