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Conor Dodd

Killed in Action

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Conor Dodd

I was wondering if anyone could help with this one. I have a Lieut. Claude Norman Champion de Crespigny who according the ODGW was Killed in Action on the 01/09/1914 but he is buried in England is this a simple mistake on ODGW or what was it that killed him ?

Conor :blink:

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Will O'Brien

Conor...........Possible mistakes aside, he could be one of those few men whose bodies were repatriated in the early days of the war..............There is a thread on this but damned if I can find it :(

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rflory

According to The Bond of Sacrifice, Volume 1 , page 108, he was killed in action on 1 September 1914 at Compiegne. "Norman, with a few men, was holding an important tactical point, and he held it until every man was killed or wounded." He was buried in the cemetery at Nery, but his body was exhumed "and placed with military honours, in the Mausoleum at Champion Lodge, on the 12th November, 1914."

The Cross of Sacrifice, Volume 1 indicates that he is buried in the Hatfield Peverel (St. Andrew) Churchyard in Essex.

Regards, Dick Flory

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Terry Denham

Dick has got the answer.

Champion de Crespigny was, indeed, one of the dozen or so officers who were returned home before such practice was forbidden in early 1915.

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bill oliver

Essex County Chronicle, Friday November 13, 1914

LIEUT. NORMAN CH. DE CRESPIGNY

BODY BROUGHT FROM FRANCE

FUNERAL AT CHAMPION LODGE

Lieut. Claude Norman Champion de Crespigny of the Queen’s Bays, son of Sir Claude and Lady Ch. de Crespigny, who met a hero’s death in what was described as a second Balaclava in an action at Compiégne on Sept.1, was buried yesterday at the Crescent (the private family mausoleum at Champion Lodge), near Maldon, with full military honours. The gallant young officer and a few men held an important tactical point until every man was killed or wounded. The deceased was buried at Néry, near Compiégne, but the body was disinterred and brought to England. The exhumation was a difficult matter, for the body was in a grave with 17 others, and all the military badges had been cut off his uniform. Identification was, however, established by the deceased’s name being on the neckband of his shirt. The body, enclosed in a coffin of polished oak, with silver-plated furniture, arrived in London on Monday, and was conveyed to Maldon by train on Tuesday. Major General Heath, of the South Midland Division, sent a gun carriage, on which the remains were conveyed to Champion Lodge. Sir Claude and Lady de Crespigny met the train and followed the coffin to their residence, Sir Claude walking behind the gun carriage.

For the funeral the 7th Worcestershires provided the firing party (H Company); band and escort (D Company); The Queen’s Bays the bearers and trumpeters; and the Warwickshires the gun, a 15-pounder. Capt. Grosvenor was in charge of the troops. A large and sympathetic crowd gathered round the Crescent, in the center of which is erected the mausoleum of polished granite, and the appearance of the long procession, moving in front of Champion Lodge and across the meadow to the spot was striking in the extreme. The firing Party, with arms reversed, marched slowly at the head, followed by the band, including the drums and buglers, with drums draped with crêpe, and under Drum-Major Gale; than came thee surpliced choir of Great Totham Church and the clergy; the gun and carriage, drawn by six jet black horses, the coffin being covered by the Union Jack; and the mourners and intimate friends, the escort bringing up the rear.

The solemn music of the Dead March, played by the band, and borne on the keen November Breeze for miles, was peculiarly impressive. At the Crescent eight stalwart N. C. O.’s of the Bays quietly and reverently shouldered their burden, and the Rev. H.T.W. Eyre, vicar of Great Totham, began the burial service. He was assisted by the Rev. R. Moseley, chaplain of the Royal Chapel, Chelsea. During the service the firing party stood at the present, and the other troops remained bareheaded. At the close of the service, which included the hymn, “God of the Living in Whose Eyes,” three volleys were fired, and the trumpeters sounded the “Last Post”.

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Guest Derrick Louis

His name is on a family memorial (I walked by it today)in the Churchyard at St Andrews Hatfield Peverel in Essex but not on the list of names of men who died in the Great War in the Church. Any ideas as to why this might be?

I have attached his photo.

post-32146-1204486103.jpg

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hooge1

Dear Madam,(The Lady Champion de Crespigny)

In answer to your letter, i will explain all that occured on the 1st of September at Nery.The 1st Cavalry Brigade were suprised about 5.30 am.;our horses were picketed down and we were drawing rations when the Germans opened fire on the camp with 12 field guns and several Maxims.Your son was in charge of the Queen's Bays, who were told to hold an important position, which they did, mowing the advancing Germans down.Your son alone advanced from that position with revolver drawn with the fixed idea of getting behind the enemy's guns and shooting down the gunners, as they were playing havoc with our men and horses, but he fell hit by shrapnel.I saw him and another officer carried away into some houses nearby.I served under your son in India when in the 1st (Kings) Dragoon Guards, and knew him as a gentlemen and thorough sportsman, and if ever a VC was won he won it that morning. I think this is all i can say. Thanking you for all your kindness to me,

I am Madam,

Yours respectfully,

Cpl A. F. Wills

5th Dragoon Guards

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hooge1

post-35225-1222188420.jpgpost-35225-1222188429.jpg

post-35225-1222188536.jpgpost-35225-1222188545.jpg

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per ardua per mare per terram

He was Mentioned in Dispatches for Nery.

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