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JessicaAnne

How long did the mail take?

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JessicaAnne

I did a search, but wasn't able to find the answer to this question. How long did it generally take the mail to travel between the home front and the Western Front? Did things like postcards or field service postcards make it through faster than letters or parcels? I know that there were a lot of variables at play, but am looking for a few rough ideas.

Thanks!

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Ryegate

Hello JessicaAnne

All I can tell you is that my uncle wrote a postcard to his mother and father on the 18th April 1915 and it is postmarked 20th April 1915. Of course, that says nothing about the date it was received by my grandparents but it may be they took a couple of days to get through the censor and posted.

It is stamped as being 'passed' but unfortunately does not give a date.

Regards

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sjustice

'lo Jessica,

The postal service was incredibly efficient; one might go as far as to say it was the most effective of the supply lines.

It would be a matter of a few days person-to-person depending on situation (Passendaele et al notwithstanding) and it wasn't a rarity for next-day delivery.

Try getting a letter from home to someone in a field near Amiens in 24 hours now!

Kind Regards,

SMJ

:ph34r:

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Ryegate

Hi Simon J

Which planet do you live on?

We can wait two days for a letter posted in the UK!

But.............I know what you mean!

Regards

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dycer

Jessica,

Here is one example.You'll enjoy the dates.

A Field Post Card addressed to Dollar in Scotland written in the Fleurbaix Sector on 23 December 1914.Franked by the Army Post Office on 25 December 1914 then Franked by Alva Post Office Clackmannanshire on 28 December 1914.

A total of 5 or 6 days assuming it was delivered on 28/29 December 1914.

If you have a look on the current Thread entitled John,George and Charles Souness.You'll see an Obituary which was published in the Local Paper on 12 February 1915 and subsequently reprinted in the Edinburgh Paper on the following day.You'll read that my Grandfather received a letter from his Oldest Son advising of his Brother's death in advance of the official notification.The letter does not survive but as my Uncle was fatally wounded on 29 January 1915 the letter must have travelled very quickly to allow my Grandfather to be informed by his Son rather than the Authorities and to be able to submit the Obituary to the Paper for publishing on 12 February.

George

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JessicaAnne

Wow, I had forgotten that I asked this question! Thanks all for the responses. The times you've given all seem to fall in line with what I've read. Just sounds too good to be true that the mail would have gotten through so quickly. I'm working on a novel in which letters to and from the Front play a large role and I see now that I've been rather conservative in my estimations of posting times!

Thanks!

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